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Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.

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avatar Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 05:18PM
Back in 1920, there appears to have been more variety of accommodations offered throughout the park than there is today:

Here's a list of lodging accommodations listed in the Yosemite Park's 1920 brochure:

Sentinel Hotel
Yosemite Lodge
Camp Curry
New Glacier Point Hotel
Merced Lake Lodge
Tenaya Lake Lodge
Big Trees Lodge
Hetch Hetchy Lodge

(I find it interesting that they omit the Wawona Hotel -- maybe it wasn't inside the park's boundary back in 1920.)

Also under amusements, the brochure lists rowboats for hire for Tenaya, Dog, Washburn, and Merced Lakes.

Here's the text of the government issued 1920 brochure in regards to the park's lodging:

Quote
Rules and Regulations Yosemite National Park 1920 - Open All Year

HOTELS, CAMPS, AND LODGES.

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK CO.—HOTELS AND LODGES.


The following hotels and permanent lodges in the park are operated by the Yosemite National Park Co.:


SENTINEL HOTEL.*

(*Automobile parking space provided free.)
Situated in the Yosemite Village 14 miles east of El Portal on the south bank of the Merced River and directly opposite Yosemite Falls. Elevation, 3,960 feet.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Room without bath, per day each person, two in a room $6.00
Room with private bath, per day each person, two in a room 7.50
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.00
Luncheon 1.50
Dinner 2.00
Lodging 2.00-3.50
Meals served in room, each person, extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in room, each person, extra .25
Tub or shower bath in detached room .50


NEW GLACIER POINT HOTEL.*

(*Automobile parking space provided free.)
Situated on Glacier Point, 3,254 feet above the floor of Yosemite Valley and overlooking the valley, Tenaya Canyon, the Upper Merced Canyon, and the crest of the High Sierra. Accessible after May 15 by the Short Trail, 4 miles, or by the Long Trail via Vernal and Nevada Falls, 11 miles, and after July 1 by automobile road, 26 miles, from Yosemite Village. Elevation, 7,214 feet.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Canvas cabin, without bath, per day each person, two in a cabin; meals in hotel dining room $5.00
Room in hotel, without bath, per day each person, two in a room 6.00
Room in hotel, with private bath, per day each person, two in a room 7.50—8.00
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.00
Luncheon 1.25
Dinner 1.75
Lodging 1.50—4.00
Meals served in room, each person, extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in room, each person, extra .25
Tub or shower bath in detached room, each .50


YOSEMITE LODGE.

Situated on the north side of Yosemite Valley three-fourths mile west of Yosemite Village, near the foot of Yosemite Falls. Elevation, 3,980 feet.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Canvas cabin without bath, per day each person, two in a cabin $4.50
Wooden cabin without bath, per day each person, two in a cabin 5.00
Wooden cabin with private bath, per day each person, two in a room 6.50
Wooden cabin with private bath and screened sleeping porch, per day each person, two in a room 7.00
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.00
Luncheon 1.00
Dinner 1.25
Lodging 1.75—3.75
Meals served in cabin, each person extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in room, each person extra .25
Tub or shower bath in detached room, each .50

SWIMMING POOL AT YOSEMITE LODGE.

Cement swimming poo1 120 by 40 feet, sand beach, 100 dressing rooms, tub and shower baths, diving tower with regulation 10-foot diving board. Pool is electrically lighted for water carnivals.

Plunge bath, including shower, use of bathing suit, towel, and dressing room: Adults, 1 ticket, 50 cents; 5 tickets, $2; children, 1 ticket, 35 cents; 4 tickets, $1; admission, 10 cents, which applies on swimming ticket.


MERCED LAKE LODGE.

Situated on the east shore of Merced Lake near the headwaters of the Merced River, 16 miles from Yosemite Village by trail via Vernal and Nevada Falls. Elevation, 7,100 feet.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Canvas cabin without bath, per day each person, two in a cabin $4.50
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.00
Luncheon 1.00
Dinner 1.25
Lodging 1.75
Meals served in cabin, each person extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in cabin, each person extra .25
Shower baths in detached room .50


TENAYA LAKE LODGE.*

(*Automobile parking space provided free.)
Situated on the east shore of Tenaya Lake, 14 miles by trail via Tenaya Canyon and Snow Creek, and 61 miles by automobile road (Big Oak Flat and Tioga Roads) from Yosemite Village. Elevation, 8,141 feet.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Canvas cabin, per day each person, two in a cabin $5.00
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.25
Luncheon 1.00
Dinner 1.50
Lodging 1.75
Meals served in cabin, each person extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in cabin, each person extra .25
Shower bath, in detached room .50


BIG TREES LODGE.*

(*Automobile parking space provided free.)
In the heart of the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees, by automobile road 34 miles from Yosemite Village and 34 miles from Glacier Point. Lodge consists of wooden cabins. The dining room is a bark structure built around a big tree. Open about May 1, dependent upon road conditions.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Wooden cabin, per day each person, two in a cabin $6.00
Luncheon is served a la carte to those desiring this meal only.
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.25
Luncheon 1.25
Dinner 1.75
Lodging 2.00
Meals served in cabin, each person extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in cabin, each person extra .25
Tub baths in detached room, each .50


HETCH HETCHY LODGE.*

(*Automobile parking space provided free.)
On the Hetch Hetchy Railroad, at Mather Station, 9 mile from Hetch Hetchy Valley and Dam Site, and 30 miles from Yosemite Valley by automobile road. Passenger trains of the Hetch Hetchy Railroad and stages of Yosemite National Park Co. operate from this point. Hetch Hetchy Lodge consists of wooden cabins, dining room, and office. Open about May 15, dependent upon road conditions.

Daily rates for meals and lodging.

Canvas cabin, per day each person, two in a cabin $5.00
Transient meal and lodging rates:
Breakfast 1.25
Luncheon 1.00
Dinner 1.50
Lodging 1.75
Meals served in cabin, each person extra .50
Coffee and toast only or light luncheon served in cabin, each person extra .25
Tub or shower baths, in detached room, each .50
Canvas and wooden cabins are usually equipped with twin beds. When desired, rooms of the cabins may be divided in three compartments by canvas curtains, forming two separate bedrooms and a sitting room.

In all hotels and lodges, children 5 years and under will be charged one-half of the regular rates. Children over 5 years, full rates.

If total of stay at Yosemite National Park Co.'s hotels and lodges is two weeks or longer, a reduction of 50 cents a day each person is made, effective from the date of arrival.

Housekeeping cottages.—A few four-room cottages, completely furnished, are available at $75 per month; less than month, rate is $3 per day. Capacity of cottage, four persons. It is advisable to make reservations in advance for June, July, and August. Address Yosemite National Park Co., Yosemite, Calif.


CURRY CAMPING CO.

CAMP CURRY.


Situated on the south side of Yosemite Valley, 1 mile east of Yosemite Village and directly beneath Glacier Point. Elevation, 3,980 feet.

Board and lodging in ordinary tents—
nbsp; Per day, each $4.00
nbsp; Per week, each 26.50
nbsp; Per four weeks, each 100.00
Children of 8 years and over will be charged full rates.
Children between 5 and 8 years of age, per day 2.50
Children between 3 and 5 years of age, per day 2.00
All children under 3 years of age, per day 1.50
Guests desiring extra tent room will be charged as follows—
Tent for four people, occupied by two people, per day extra, each 1.00
Tent for two people occupied by one person, per day extra 1.00
Extra tent rates will be applied only between June 1 and August 1.
Tub or shower baths .35
(3 tickets for $1, 5 tickets for $1.50.)
Meal and lodging rates—
Breakfast $0.75
Lunch 1.00
Dinner 1.00
Lodging 1.25
Meals sent to tents or served out of meal hours, 25 cents extra.
Board and lodging in bungalow tents, including bath:
Per day, each, two persons in a room $6.00
Per day, one person in a room 7.00
Per week, each, two persons in a room 40.00
Per week, one person in a room 47.00
Per four weeks, each, two persons in a room 155.00
Per four weeks, one person in a room 184.00
Children in bungalow tents, $1 each, per day, more than rates for children in ordinary tents.
Use of electric stoves in tents and tent bungalows for heating purposes, 50 cents per day extra.
Plunge baths, including shower, together with use of bathing suit:
1 ticket $0.50
5 tickets 2.00
Hair cut .50
Hair singe .35
Beard trimmed .50
Shave .25
Face massage .50
Head massage .50
Men's shampoo (plain) .50
Men's shampoo (tonic) .75
Men's shampoo (oil) 1.00
Ladles' shampoo 1.00
All tonics .25
Manicure .75
Shoe shine .15
White or special shine .25
Moving picture shows, not to exceed per hour, per person .10
Dancing, per evening per couple, not to exceed .25
Automobile storage, per day or portion thereof .50


NPS.gov: Yosemite Rules and Regulations 1920 Brochure - Hotels, Camps, and Lodges
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 05:36PM
The Merced Lake Lodge is the High Sierra Camp.
Same is true for Tenaya Lake Lodge.
Note that these were CANVAS "Cabins".

Hetch Hetchy Lodge I believe is present day Evergreen Lodge.

Pretty sure Sentinel and GP both burned down.

Pretty cool link. Thanks

(btw ... many properly call the Tuolumne Meadows Lodge the TM HSC)



Picasa Pictures
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 05:51PM
Quote
chick-on

(btw ... many properly call the Tuolumne Meadows Lodge the TM HSC)

You're making troubleangry smiley



Old Dude
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 03:09PM
Quote
mrcondron
Quote
chick-on

(btw ... many properly call the Tuolumne Meadows Lodge the TM HSC)

You're making troubleangry smiley

And that surprises you?
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 05:55PM
I also found it fascinating that one could actually rent rowboats (and possibly someone to row them) even in at a remote lake, like Washburn Lake.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 10:11PM
Tenaya Lake Lodge? HSC? Would have been a great location for a Camp/Lodge. What happened to it?
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 04:51PM
Quote
Paris92
Tenaya Lake Lodge? HSC? Would have been a great location for a Camp/Lodge. What happened to it?

I read something about what happened to it a while back. If I can find it again, I'll let you know.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 05:26PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
Paris92
Tenaya Lake Lodge? HSC? Would have been a great location for a Camp/Lodge. What happened to it?

I read something about what happened to it a while back. If I can find it again, I'll let you know.



Replaced by the May Lake camp (no specific reason given):
http://www.yosemitepark.com/Accommodations_HighSierraCamps_History.aspx
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 06:49PM
Quote
szalkowski

Replaced by the May Lake camp (no specific reason given):
http://www.yosemitepark.com/Accommodations_HighSierraCamps_History.aspx

Possibly because of the problem of too many mosquitos?

Glen Aulin HSC was moved and Booth Lake HSC was relocated and renamed Vogelsang due to too many inhospitable mosquitos at their original locations.
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 05:59PM
It would be cool if the GP hotel had never burned down. Thanks for sharing.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 06:12PM
Quote
hotrod4x5
It would be cool if the GP hotel had never burned down.


Having seen the Glacier Point Hotel, I can assure you that the only ones sad to see it go were the rats (and other woodland creatures) that inhabited it.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/28/2011 06:14PM by szalkowski.
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 06:14PM
Quote
szalkowski
Quote
hotrod4x5
It would be cool if the GP hotel had never burned down.


Having seen the Glacier Point Hotel, I can assure you that the only ones sad to see it go were the rats that inhabited it.
When did it burn and how old are you? Was it ugly? Uglier than the Wawona?
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 06:49PM
Quote
hotrod4x5
Quote
szalkowski
Quote
hotrod4x5
It would be cool if the GP hotel had never burned down.


Having seen the Glacier Point Hotel, I can assure you that the only ones sad to see it go were the rats that inhabited it.
When did it burn and how old are you? Was it ugly? Uglier than the Wawona?


Burned in 1969. (I was in my second year of grad. school... you do the math.)
Adequate words have not yet been coined which suffice to describe the GPH. The Wawona is a beautiful swan by comparison.

A quick search of the archives yielded this previous thread:
http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?1,14581,14582
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 07:17PM
As a pre-teen, I visited Glacier Point in the late 50's (we camped in the valley with the bears, so did not see much of the inside of the hotel). Parking was in front of the hotel and, I believe, there was an outbuilding with flush toilet facilities apart from the hotel. Or perhaps it was a public bathroom on the side of the hotel. The pictures of the hotel on the internet suggest that it was huge. I don't remember it that way. As it recall, it had a wooden porch and did not seem very large (one story) with a interior "country store" atmosphere.. It is possible that the upper floor only was primarily visible from the parking area so I may not have appreciated its true size.. The building itself was to the south of the current main Glacier Point view and seemed to face Vernal/Nevada Falls more than Half Dome.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 10:01AM
Quote
Frank Furter
As a pre-teen, I visited Glacier Point in the late 50's (we camped in the valley with the bears, so did not see much of the inside of the hotel). Parking was in front of the hotel and, I believe, there was an outbuilding with flush toilet facilities apart from the hotel. Or perhaps it was a public bathroom on the side of the hotel. The pictures of the hotel on the internet suggest that it was huge. I don't remember it that way. As it recall, it had a wooden porch and did not seem very large (one story) with a interior "country store" atmosphere.. It is possible that the upper floor only was primarily visible from the parking area so I may not have appreciated its true size.. The building itself was to the south of the current main Glacier Point view and seemed to face Vernal/Nevada Falls more than Half Dome.


There is a photograph of the hotel in each of these links:
http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ca-yosemite-glacier-point-hotel-real-114692313
http://www.seeyosemite.com/history-of-glacier-point-hotel-or-lodge.html
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 11:05PM
The Park Service could have replaced the lost accommodations after the Glacier Point Hotel burned down by building cabins for park visitors nearby (where the cabins are currently located for park employees just before the entrance to the Glacier Point parking lot).

I found it ironic that the powers to be in Yosemite were quick to replace employee housing that was lost during the 1997 flood, but are slow as molasses in replacing all the visitors accommodations that were lost during the same flood.

Likewise, the Park Service never replaced the lodging rooms lost when the Glacier Point Hotel burned down with other lodging accommodations elsewhere in the park.
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 06:03PM
wasnt there a hotel below nevada falls? maybe it was a restraunt
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 07:24PM
Quote
ryanmj
wasnt there a hotel below nevada falls? maybe it was a restraunt


See this thread:
http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?1,8817,8922#msg-8922
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 08:57PM
Quote
szalkowski
Quote
ryanmj
wasnt there a hotel below nevada falls? maybe it was a restraunt


See this thread:
http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?1,8817,8922#msg-8922
great info, my parents were up there a few years ago and thy were collecting "artifacts" from the hotel site, I had no idea it existed until than.
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 10:47AM
Quote
ryanmj

great info, my parents were up there a few years ago and thy were collecting "artifacts" from the hotel site, ...

That would probably have been illegal, given the historical significance of the Casa Nevada.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 10:49AM
Collecting artifacts is definitely illegal in all U.S. National Parks.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 11:02AM
No wonder I couldn't find squat earlier this year.

Taking ANYTHING is illegal... including pinecones and the such.. but I guess it's ok to burn them (go figure).



Picasa Pictures
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 11:01AM
Quote
basilbop
Quote
ryanmj

great info, my parents were up there a few years ago and thy were collecting "artifacts" from the hotel site, ...

That would probably have been illegal, given the historical significance of the Casa Nevada.



From
http://www.nps.gov/yose/historyculture/archeology.htm :
Anything more than 50 years is considered historic and should be left in place. Historic bottles often have bubbles or discoloration, historic cans and metal debris are often rusted, historic ceramics have maker’s mark stamps indicating when and where they were made.

Also:
http://www.nps.gov/yose/historyculture/protect-arch.htm



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/29/2011 11:06AM by szalkowski.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 11:05AM
So I guess I went against what I just said when I took out an old Budweiser can
with a pop top that was mashed by a bear near Morrison Creek...
?



Picasa Pictures
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 11:51AM
Quote
chick-on
So I guess I went against what I just said when I took out an old Budweiser can
with a pop top that was mashed by a bear near Morrison Creek...
?


You're OK, it wasn't 50 years old. Pop top cans weren't introduced until 1963:
http://inventors.about.com/od/sstartinventions/a/soft_drink.htm
Besides, the law doesn't apply to wildlife and, also, probably not to domesticated fowl.
(HystericallyHistorically Yours)
The Marmots

P.S. Hopefully the bear also mashed the clown that left it there.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/29/2011 11:53AM by szalkowski.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 06:13PM
For fun I was gonna post this one under:
Saw a King Cobra Snake in The Sierra (pretty sure eeeky would be stopped in tracks by this guy too)

and... I also have a LARGE photo collection of these
So many that I have contemplated making a picture set of them
I've found at least 3 this year... Anyone else find these on a regular basis?



Picasa Pictures
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 01:19AM
Quote
szalkowski
Quote
ryanmj
wasnt there a hotel below nevada falls? maybe it was a restraunt


See this thread:
http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?1,8817,8922#msg-8922


Also, see this post and the one immediately following it:
http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?1,4782,35407#msg-35407
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 06:09PM
Quote
plawrence
(I find it interesting that they omit the Wawona Hotel -- maybe it wasn't inside the park's boundary back in 1920.)

That's correct. Although the Mariposa Grove was part of the original Yosemite Grant, the broader Wawona area was not part of the park until 1932.

For those who aren't familiar with the Yosemite Grant:

The Valley and The Mariposa Grove were protected by an act of congress (The Yosemite Grant) in 1864. Note that this was 8 years before the formation of the National Park system (the first designated NP was Yellowstone in 1872). Although created by the US Congress, it was a California State Park at that time. When Yosemite NP was formed (in a significantly different shape than we know it today...significantly "wider" but not as "tall"winking smiley in 1890, the Valley and the Mariposa Grove remained a California State Park while the rest of the park was managed by the US Army (since the National Park Service wouldn't be formed until 1916). It wasn't until 1906 that the Valley & Grove were ceded to the US government to become part of the NP.

During the latter half of the 19th century, there was also an enormous amount of land within the new park boundaries which had been "homesteaded" (in attempt to get people to settle the wild west, the government would give you 160 acres pretty much for the asking, as long as you agreed to live on it and mine it, farm it, harvest it or destroy it (um, excuse me, "utilize it"winking smiley in some other way). This created further logistical nightmares because much of the national park was legally obtained and owned private land. It was decades before this got straightened out, much of it via land swaps which significantly altered the overall shape and area of the park (most people don't realize that the park's current 1189 sq mi is significantly smaller than the original 1500+ sq mi (can't find the exact number just now)). To this day, there are still private holdings in Foresta, Wawona and Aspen Valley although all the other claims were either bought out, swapped for land outside the park or simply dropped from the park.

The original park boundaries were drawn along the borders of these 160-acre land claims and, as such were very boxy and had little to do with natural features. Even though the intent of the original park was to protect the entire tuolumne and merced watersheds all the way to the headwaters, the original boundaries were quite random and haphazard with respect to the actual ecosystem. Much of the western boundary of the park still shows this patch-work shape (even though the western boundary is heavily changed from the original park boundaries). The northern and eastern boundaries follow more natural features now.

Somewhere around here I've got links to some interesting (and occasionally upsetting) articles about the changing boundaries of the park over the years but I can't seem to find them just now.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 07:26PM
By any chance, do you (or anyone else) of a map of the original boundary of Yosemite National Park as of 1890? I know it actually extended further south to Mount Ritter and Banner Peak. But because of mining claims, that area was later excluded from the park.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 07:47PM
Library of Congress has some historic photos including Hutchings Hotel, Laddeig's Hotel, and Sentinel Hotel:



See:
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/index/subjects/



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 07:58PM
Quote
plawrence
By any chance, do you (or anyone else) of a map of the original boundary of Yosemite National Park as of 1890? I know it actually extended further south to Mount Ritter and Banner Peak. But because of mining claims, that area was later excluded from the park.

The earliest map I have of the area is 1893 but it doesn't show the park boundaries.

I have a very interesting 1897 map which you can find here: http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/mrsid2.2/mrsid_server/bin/show_java.pl?client=CA_125k&image=CA_125k_yosemite_1897.sid (it'll ask you to load a java plugin to view the map but the plugin seems safe to me). You can view it online but the viewing window is very small. You're better off downloading it (it's about 4Meg) and getting the SID plugin for your browser so you can poke around in full screen mode.

I can't recall how much the boundaries changed (if at all) in the first 7 years but you'll certainly see very different boundaries (and roads!) on these maps

They also have several other early 20th century maps so, by comparing them, you can get a sense of the boundary movement.

For an interesting thread on old maps including links to a lot of other old Yosemite maps, check this out: http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?1,5185,31380#msg-31380

Also, if you click on the Picassa Pictures link at the bottom of any of chick-on's posts, he's got scans of pretty much his whole historical map library there.

Oh yeah, and if you haven't checked out the online Yosemite library, you can spend LOTS of time here: http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/maps/

Taking a quick scan when I grabbed that link, I'd forgotten about this map by John Muir or the "proposed Yosemite National Park" I'm not sure if the original park boundaries matched these proposed boundaries but you can certainly see how much wider it was. I've also got to review the history of the Wawona area because it's clearly included in this map but the Wawona history page on the yosemite .gov site mentions Wawona not being incorporated until much later. As I think back on it, I'm recalling that area was in and out of the Park a few times but haven't read about it in detail for a bit so need to refresh my memory.


Enjoy!



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/28/2011 08:05PM by DavidK42.
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 28, 2011 08:16PM
I've seen before John Muir's map of the proposed boundary of the new Yosemite National Park, but I've never been able to located an official map of the park's boundary that was signed into law in 1890.

Thanks for the heads-up on the 1897 map.
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 04:30PM
Here's a map with all, or at least most, of the boundary changes for the park until present

avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 05:11PM
Thank you for the map. This is excellent!
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 11:51AM
Thanks for posting both this and the other thread on how to get to the park in 1920. It is fun to read about how Yosemite was in the past. If anyone is in the park this summer, I highly recommend going to the exhibit on Views and Visitors that is currently running in the Valley Museum.

VIEWS & VISITORS: THE YOSEMITE
EXPERIENCE In THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY

This summer the museum gallery
exhibit focuses on the Yosemite visitor
experience from 1900 to 1946, an era of
great change for the park. Photographs,
paintings, ephemera, and historic
artifacts from that era will be exhibited.
Oral histories, digital slide shows
and film footage will supplement the
artifacts on exhibit. The exhibit will be
open from June 8 to September 30
avatar Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
July 29, 2011 12:11PM
Quote
parklover
Thanks for posting both this and the other thread on how to get to the park in 1920. It is fun to read about how Yosemite was in the past. If anyone is in the park this summer, I highly recommend going to the exhibit on Views and Visitors that is currently running in the Valley Museum.
... The exhibit will be open from June 8 to September 30


These two titles in the Yosemite Online Library provide a plethora of information on the above and a myriad of other topics:
http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/one_hundred_years_in_yosemite/
http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/yosemite_resources/
Re: Yosemite Lodging Options back in 1920.
August 22, 2011 07:46PM
Just got back from my first visit to Yosemite a couple of weeks ago. Had a great time and have enjoyed following this forum. I was reading up on some of the history of YNP. I stayed at the Lodge by the Falls and was trying to find out some of its history. I loved the link for all the old guides. The Lodge is listed in the 1920 guide, but not the 1912 guide. I also found this website with historic maps. http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/maps/

By studying the guide and maps I learned that even though the Lodge dates to sometime between 1912 and 1920, it seems that only the swimming pool is left of the original lodge. The oldest map at the link (1924) shows that none of the original buildings remain. The main buildings of the current lodge are all found on the 1963 map and the lodging buildings show up on the 1972 map. The earliest lodge map shows that there were only the small cottages and tent cabins close to the river. Most of the original cabins were still there on the 1987 map, but they were lost in the flood of 1997. It also seems that two of the bathroom buildings by the tent cabins from 1924 survived up to 1963. The maps show that the pool location in the 1924 map matches the current location. This was a bit tricky to sort out, since nothing else is left of the original. But the 1962 map, shows that the the location of the pool in 1962 matches the current pool, based on the alignment with the current lodge buildings and the 1962 pool location is also the same as the 1924 pool, based on the alignment with the original cabins. I did enjoy swimming in the pool to find the place were you could see both Yosemite Falls and Sentinel Rock at the same time. A lot warmer than the rivers and lakes.

One final bit I found in the 1936 guide. Things used to be so much fun in Yosemite:

"See the fire fall each night at 9 o'clock from the upper end of the Valley or at Camp Curry.
Bears are fed every evening at 9:30 o'clock about 2 miles west of the Old Village.
Dances every evening except Sunday at 9 o'clock at Camp Curry."



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