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Re: Book on Half Dome

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avatar Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 08:23AM
I have been reading preview on Google Books for the following book
One Best Hike: Everything You Need to Know to Successfully Hike Yosemite's Most Famous Landmark: Yosemite's Half Dome
By Rick Deutsch
Edition: illustrated
Published by Wilderness Press, 2007
ISBN 0899974430, 9780899974439
113 pages
Looks like a terrific resouce for anyone planning their 1st hike of Half Dome. I have been 5 times and still learned stuff from the previews.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 09:50AM
Does it mention that you should gary 5 gallons of water with you?
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:13AM
Quote
bill-e-g
Does it mention that you should gary 5 gallons of water with you?

Does that mean you have a guy named Gary bring all your water?



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:18AM
Quote
Frank Furter
Quote
bill-e-g
Does it mention that you should gary 5 gallons of water with you?

Does that mean you have a guy named Gary bring all your water?

I think it's a new service just for Half Dome hikes. The big perk is that while the cost is the same as the mule trains, there is far less poop left on the trail!



Busy Bee
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:15AM
Quote
Goatie
Does it mention that you should gary 5 gallons of water with you?


What's wrong with the creek(s)?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/20/2009 10:24AM by Bee.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 11:21AM
This is an excellent book. Very comprehensive on planning for the hike. I've seen too many people on the trail that obviously weren't prepared for it. A little frightening; and I'm surprised that there aren't more rescues.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 11:29AM
I just noticed that the Half Dome book appears to be one of a series called "One Best Hike".
There is also one for Whitney
http://www.amazon.com/One-Best-Hike-Mt-Whitney/dp/0899974643



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 08:02PM
I have a copy of that book and actually attended a class that he puts on. He has a web site hikehalfdome.com. There is a blog there that he covers all kinds of interesting yosemite information and i have learned alot from it. The book and his class are a catch all and he has hiked it more times then anyone i know. I am planning on hiking half dome May 29 and I feel very well prepared after reading his book and taking the class. I think anyone that is going to attempt this hike, should read it.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 08:33PM
I can only shake my head at this point, as I read about all of the preperation that I should have had before taking that HD hike. I hitched a ride to Yosemite at the last minute with some friends who were camping at Crane Flat. The next morning, it was, "Hey, we are gonna do this Hike to Half Dome -- you wanna come...yeah...we will be back WAAAY before dark" Sure, no problem. Water? Yup, I have a couple of bicycle water bottles that I brought, and besides flip-flops, I have these running shoes, too -- I'm set to go! I ran out of water, and even though I was surrounded by water, without a filter, I as good as in the desert. Luckily, we were able to bum along with others who were much better prepared, and use their filters. Of course, by the time we reached the cables, it was prime thunder time (2;00pm) and my friends wisely begged off the cables. I, on the other hand, put common sense aside and climbed the cables, unsure whether I should be afraid of the cimb,or more afraid of the clouds overhead. It started to rain. The cables were slick. I got to the top, gulped down some lunch, looked around, and flew back down. Needless to say, we got back after dark with no flashlights, water, or common sense to spare.



Busy Bee
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 08:39PM
Quote
Bee
I can only shake my head at this point, as I read about all of the preperation that I should have had before taking that HD hike. I hitched a ride to Yosemite at the last minute with some friends who were camping at Crane Flat. The next morning, it was, "Hey, we are gonna do this Hike to Half Dome -- you wanna come...yeah...we will be back WAAAY before dark" Sure, no problem. Water? Yup, I have a couple of bicycle water bottles that I brought, and besides flip-flops, I have these running shoes, too -- I'm set to go! I ran out of water, and even though I was surrounded by water, without a filter, I as good as in the desert. Luckily, we were able to bum along with others who were much better prepared, and use their filters. Of course, by the time we reached the cables, it was prime thunder time (2;00pm) and my friends wisely begged off the cables. I, on the other hand, put common sense aside and climbed the cables, unsure whether I should be afraid of the cimb,or more afraid of the clouds overhead. It started to rain. The cables were slick. I got to the top, gulped down some lunch, looked around, and flew back down. Needless to say, we got back after dark with no flashlights, water, or common sense to spare.

Sigh:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_essentials
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 09:47PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
Bee
I can only shake my head at this point, as I read about all of the preperation that I should have had before taking that HD hike. I hitched a ride to Yosemite at the last minute with some friends who were camping at Crane Flat. The next morning, it was, "Hey, we are gonna do this Hike to Half Dome -- you wanna come...yeah...we will be back WAAAY before dark" Sure, no problem. Water? Yup, I have a couple of bicycle water bottles that I brought, and besides flip-flops, I have these running shoes, too -- I'm set to go! I ran out of water, and even though I was surrounded by water, without a filter, I as good as in the desert. Luckily, we were able to bum along with others who were much better prepared, and use their filters. Of course, by the time we reached the cables, it was prime thunder time (2;00pm) and my friends wisely begged off the cables. I, on the other hand, put common sense aside and climbed the cables, unsure whether I should be afraid of the cimb,or more afraid of the clouds overhead. It started to rain. The cables were slick. I got to the top, gulped down some lunch, looked around, and flew back down. Needless to say, we got back after dark with no flashlights, water, or common sense to spare.

Sigh:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_essentials



Eleven... don't forget the manzanita repellent.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/20/2009 09:51PM by szalkowski.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:08PM
QBW,
You need to twinkle your nose...
smiling smiley
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:18PM
Quote
PoopyheadGoatie
QBW,
You need to twinkle your nose...

I will definitely remember to do this the next time I am hugging the side of a mountain at sundownspinning smiley sticking its tongue out


Busy Bee
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:02PM
Quote
Eeeek
Sigh:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_essentials

I was in my early twenties and quite convinced that I was immortal!

Quote
The Beaks
Eleven... don't forget the manzanita repellent.

In my twenties, manzanita parted with a mere nod of the head..spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Busy Bee
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:11PM
Quote
Bee
I was in my early twenties and quite convinced that I was immortal!

And I thought my marriage was.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 08:47PM
Quote
Roadrash
I am planning on hiking half dome May 29

I'll be hiking it the 29th, too. Maybe I'll see you there. Do you have a blog or something so that I can see what you look like and keep an eye out for you?
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:36PM
The Beesentials:
- 2 Flashlights
- A Whole LOTTA Extra Clothes
- Styling Booties (THEY HAVE VIBRAM SOLES!)
- Obligatory Hat (pointed optional)
- Space Age Blankie (doubles as cape)
- Multi Tool (maybe cut out sticker for bear can to justify reason for bringing)
- GoatPS Navigation System (tends to be slightly outta wack)
- Cache of bandaids
- Twinkies (optionally supplied by GITF) (goats in the field)
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:39PM
Quote
bill-e-g
The Beesentials:
- 2 Flashlights
- A Whole LOTTA Extra Clothes
- Styling Booties (THEY HAVE VIBRAM SOLES!)
- Obligatory Hat (pointed optional)
- Space Age Blankie (doubles as cape)
- Multi Tool (maybe cut out sticker for bear can to justify reason for bringing)
- GoatPS Navigation System (tends to be slightly outta wack)
- Cache of bandaids
- Twinkies (optionally supplied by GITF) (goats in the field)

- portable furnace!
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 20, 2009 10:40PM
Busy BeeTwinkies are thee most important item on that list!!!

(I earned one for crawling hiking to the top of Smith Peak)
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 21, 2009 06:20AM
I'll be the guy in his late twenties with the red REI backpack. I am planning on hitting the trail at 5am.
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 05:31AM
More than 3/4 of the book doesn't describe the hike. You could skip most of the chapters to the one that may actually be useful to people who haven't hiked the trail before. Also, many of the authors recommendations are unrealistic. Following are a few examples:


Water
The author emphasizes the importance of carrying sufficient water and supply. When I went to half dome, I took his recommendations and carried 5 liters of water in my day pack for my wife and I. We also carried a hiker pro water filter to refill on the way back. The water added a lot of weight to our day pack, making the hike even more tiring. My recommendation to anyone is that if you are hiking the trail during the Spring, I recommend carrying less water and refilling at one of the many streams as needed.

Other supplies
In addition to the water, we brought climbing gear for locking ourselves to the cables, layers of clothing that we shed along the hike, food, and other supplies, making the pack quite heavy -- roughly 30 pounds. Carrying this much additional weight from the Valley is no small feat. We were the most oversupplied hikers on the trail that day and I regret not packing significantly lighter. I cannot emphasize this enough: YOU DO NOT NEED TO OVER PLAN AND OVER PACK FOR THIS HIKE DESPITE THE AUTHOR'S RECOMMENDATIONS.


Layers of clothing
To hell with maintaing a perfect temperature on your hike. If you hike the trail in May, it will be chilly at 6am in the Valley, but you will warm up once you start your hike and you won't need anything more than a t-shirt until you reach the mist trail, where you need water protection and your hands may get a bit frostbitten. Once you are past the mist trail, you will be hit with cooler winds only at the top of half dome. You won't spend any more than an hour or two at the top, and the cooler weather won't dampen your spirits. My wife and I each shed our patagonia base and mid layers, adding a lot more weight to my already full day pack.


The Sub-Dome scramble
The author does a very poor job at describing sub-dome. Sub-dome has a set of narrow granite switchback stairs that end near the top. There were a few people at the top of the stairs when we got there who were scratching their heads as to what happened to the steps. It was obvious that this was the sub-dome scramble, and I had to point them to the section that they'd have to scramble. You are basically expected to scramble up a ~40 degree granite dome that seems a hell of a lot more dangerous than half dome, which has cables. I am surprised that no one has fallen to their death at this part of the climb. People were *walking* down this section with ease, but the ascent seemed a lot worse from the bottom than it actually was. Nonetheless, this section is scary and I saw many turn back at this point. I recommend that you rest after you finish the steps, as you will likely be very tired by this point of the hike, and "man up" for the scramble. You can do it.


In all, the book is helpful but you will learn more from researching the trails online.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/29/2009 05:35AM by Dowwie.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 07:27AM
Some good points.


I know that my family has freaked out more on the subdome scramble area than on half dome. Although I don't think it is as dangerous as the cables, the loose decomposed granite sand makes it feel slippery. More than one Half Dome climber has found themselves clinging to the isolated trees on the approach to the subdome. I think that section has been re-built at least once because there is evidence of old holds and suggestion of cable anchors along the way.

Regarding water, my first hike ended with me drinking directly from the spring due to thirst. His recommendation is probably better than erring on the side of insufficient water. Many people have no idea how to use tablets or filters.

Regarding layers and food: My family has decided to take only 1 snack and lots of water when they hike half dome again-- no lunches and no raingear/coats. Sun protection is valuable, however that is achieved.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 07:58AM
It has been a very long time since I have climbed Half Dome, and I don't remember Subdome. Where in relation to the actual cable walk is subdome?
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 08:05AM
Subdome in the little hump you go over to get to the base of the cables.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 12:36AM
"little"? confused smiley
avatar Sub-Dome
May 31, 2009 02:44PM
Quote
Bee
It has been a very long time since I have climbed Half Dome, and I don't remember Subdome. Where in relation to the actual cable walk is subdome?

See the hump just before Half Dome?





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/31/2009 02:45PM by eeek.
avatar Re: Sub-Dome
May 31, 2009 04:16PM
Great picture -- I can really see the subdome from this angle. I am not sure why I have no recollection of this part of the hike. I remember all of the waterfalls and the cables, but the subdome remains a blank.


Bee Cowboy
avatar Re: Sub-Dome
May 31, 2009 04:27PM
I've found that it get lost in the anticipation of the cables. Of course I've only come in from the east over Clouds Rest so maybe I've not been so tired.



Old Dude
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 09:14AM
On the first trip I was a little surprised that the granite steps ended, and there seemed to be no indication of where to go...I do think that particular part doesn't get much mention. The steps, no doubt, are mentioned because you get there first, and you can't help but "notice" them. I had started walking up the steps at a normal hiking pace, and quickly discovered that wasn't a good idea (by the time I figured out that I was out of breath, I was REALLY out of breath 8^). The 'scramble' part of it is something I actually look forward to, because it means you're almost to the cables, which I also like. And the view is easy to appreciate from that upper-subdome area because you (or at least I) have to take it fairly slow, stopping to enjoy it).

There's good reason the steps have earned nicknames like "Satan's staircase"...it's really the only part of the hike that I never look forward to. (seconded by the manure-covered lower half of the John Muir Trail (Clark pt.-Mist) and switchbacks if returning that way).

My pack is always heavier, but I think someone in the group has to be prepared. Besides the flashlights with spare batteries/bulb, whistle, space blanket, map that everyone should have, enough clothing to at least keep you from hypothermia is pretty important. Zip off pants are handy, and while the mist trail can be OK without a poncho in hot weather, if you go in May or late summer, that may not be something you can depend on. Spare socks are an absolute must. I always carry first aid and fire-starting necessities and a hooded packable raincoat. A water filter saves you from having to carry quite so much water, or drink iodine 8^P.

Lunch and relaxing on top is the "reward" for me, no way I'm leaving lunch behind. The Merced river water along the trail from Nevada Fall to Little Yosemite Valley is easy to get to and refill; whether to filter is of course your call, not something I worry about, and the icy cold water always tastes great. I wouldn't leave that area with less than a half gallon, even considering the springs along the way, so it doesn't seem like the 5 liters for two people was all that excessive.

I've heard some people call the sub-dome area 'quarter dome' and that's as wrong as calling the visor on top the "diving board". Quarter domes are elsewhere, not part of Half Dome.



Gary
Yosemite Photo Galleries: http://www.pbase.com/roberthouse/yo
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 01:34PM
Quarter Domes are just to the southwest and below Clouds Rest. They are the two pointy things down there.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/29/2009 01:35PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 02:39PM
Quote
Sierrafan
I've heard some people call the sub-dome area 'quarter dome' and that's as wrong as calling the visor on top the "diving board". Quarter domes are elsewhere, not part of Half Dome.

The Yosemite NP web site has referred to the sub-dome as the "shoulder"

At least, I think that's what they were referring to...
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 06:01PM
Quote
Vince

The Yosemite NP web site has referred to the sub-dome as the "shoulder"

At least, I think that's what they were referring to...

Yes, I don't think 'sub-dome' is anything official, just a common usage. The part in the middle at the base of the cables is often called the saddle.

Which would make it an odd-shaped horse. The 'visor' would have to be on the hat which goes on the head, so the shoulder would be down below the saddle, which means you'd be riding on its neck...



Gary
Yosemite Photo Galleries: http://www.pbase.com/roberthouse/yo
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 29, 2009 07:52PM
The book did pay off. I did the hike today, and was able to pretty much know where i was going, where to find water, and was well prepared. This should be req. reading for anyone hitting the trail. I left at 430 to avoid the impending thunderstorm, which was on the horizon. I was able to make it at the cables by 10am, hike up, and then down by 1030 when the thunder started. I hiked down for two hours after that and even with the rain and thunder, i could still see people going up the cables, very risky indeed. I also saw a guy try to walk up the cables, while walking up it 20 feet from the cables, he made it about half way up, before he realized it was a bad idea, and went back to the cables. Nothing stopping him from sliding to his death. I also watched people walking up with no water and looking pretty screwed up, like they were going to hurt themselves. I could not spend anytime at top, so it was more of a marathon, then an enjoyable trip which kind of sucked, but was glad that i did it.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 12:46AM
I must have passed you today. I tried to beat the storm, but failed. I made it to the base of the cables at 11:30 (wanted to be on top of HD by 11:00). The sky looked clear until about 45 min before I reached the cables, then the clouds started coming in fast.

I hoofed it as fast as I could all the way from Curry Village (started at 7); and the weather forecast had the storm starting at 1p. But it was early. It was a bit disappointing to try so hard, and make it that far only to have to give it up, but I sure didn't want to be on top in that weather. Probably stayed on sub-dome longer than I should have, enjoying the lightning show (not exactly the best place to be either).

But it was still a great day. Saw a bear on the way down...doing what bears are supposed to do, tearing at decaying logs looking for insects to eat, instead of human food. smiling smiley
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 05:20AM
Yeah, i watched the weather report on multiple websites and they all said one pm. I only made it because i left so early and was paranoid. You made great time though you were about one hour quicker then me getting there. Good job on that i walk fast and could not of gotten there any faster. I wish i would of stayed on sub dome longer, i didnt look around much and boy are my calves hurting today
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 07:06AM
I was moving faster than was comfortable for me. I may have been one of the people you thought was "hurting himself". smiling smiley
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 11:18AM
After reading all these posts, I've decided not to buy the book.

Well, I wouldn't, anyway. I don't like to be babysat like that. I do not want to know what's past the next turn. I knew the hike was only a little over 8 miles one way and the destination was clear, that's all I needed to know. Experience showed my how much water to tote. I made it up no problem except my acrophobia the first time on the cables (I am afraid of heights). Looking back at it, the granite stairs on the shoulder are way more scary since they stop far from the top and the loose sand/gravel is pretty bad.

IMO.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 11:38AM
Quote
Vince
After reading all these posts, I've decided not to buy the book.

Well, I wouldn't, anyway. I don't like to be babysat like that. I do not want to know what's past the next turn. I knew the hike was only a little over 8 miles one way and the destination was clear, that's all I needed to know. Experience showed my how much water to tote. I made it up no problem except my acrophobia the first time on the cables (I am afraid of heights). Looking back at it, the granite stairs on the shoulder are way more scary since they stop far from the top and the loose sand/gravel is pretty bad.

IMO.

I think it is a combination of fatigue from the prior 7 mile hike, excitment in anticipation of the cables, shortness of breath, and sudden change in the hiking trail (from a walk in the forest to climbing stairs and over granite) with the slippery surface on a relatively exposed area that gets a lot of people. The rapid heart rate from the climb feeds the sense of anxiety on that scramble. I have witnessed some "warm family moments" (not my family) such as a father screaming at his son "to get moving or we are going to leave you" in that section.

Obviously, the Half Dome cable hike would never be developed or allowed in this century.

Question: Should the cables be removed to allow Half Dome to return to a more pristine condition accessible only by skilled climbers with or without equipment?
Opposite Question: If it became NPS policy to create or allow other hikes like Half Dome (hikes that require unnatural mechanical assistance), what otherwise dangerous hike would be worth facilitating with cables or other devices (?Ledge Trail, something up El Cap in some way) to allow the average person access?



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 11:51AM
The cables are legacy. They will probably stay up as the poslihing on the route is done, the trail to the base is ancient, the demand will remain strong, but I agree they would never be put in new these days for two reasons: seemingly way too dangerous, and not a part of the natural environs.

Don't even think about taking out trails and that's an order.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/30/2009 11:52AM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 01:10PM
I have two sides of thought on this subject. My first instinct would be to shut it down to all but experienced climbers.

My second instinct is to leave it the way it is. There are a hella-of a lot of people attempting Half Dome who do not belong up there due to a combination of ignorance or misinformation regarding the demands on the body, proper clothing and/or footwear, proper hydration, time allowance, and weather savy. If it were shut down all those folks might gravitate to day hiking attempts in other areas of the park we would just as not want to see them. At least Half Dome keeps many of them in one crowded location. Cynical and sanctimonious of me? Yup! Guilty as charged.

Jim
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 01:20PM
I think the most likely next event will be some sort of permit system for the Half Dome cables. The major danger in mid-summer is the crowding on the cables. Although I must say that the granite is becoming very slick, noticably different in 2006 from when I climbed it in early 90's.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 04:39PM
If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

There was a discussion of this a while back when the 3 deaths had occurred (two were in off-season with cables down). The system is pretty self-regulating as it is.

People who don't like crowds, don't go, or try to go when it's not crowded.

The cables are a narrow, two-way street, with the slowest ones being the limiting factor. People who see that will either wait, or not go up. (or, as the moron did posted above, just climb up elsewhere, turning back or adding to the Darwin pool 8^).

The long hike to get there is a deterrent on its own, for many.

Just seeing the cables, or fear of heights, is a deterrent for many others.

For those with some technical skills, they can skip the cables and use the Snake Dike route.

Lightning and thunderstorms reduce the number of sane people going up, when they occur. For the rest, when there are signs at bottom and top warning of the danger, why worry about it?

Really, Half Dome crowding is only a problem for people who must go in the busy summer season, and especially if they leave the trailhead at a 'convenient' time.

There were quite a rash of articles about climbing HD within the past couple of years, which I think caused a lot of people to go who otherwise wouldn't. If the publicity subsides, maybe the traffic will lighten up a bit.

So hopefully they'll just leave it alone unless there begin to be real problems, which there aren't now.



Gary
Yosemite Photo Galleries: http://www.pbase.com/roberthouse/yo
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 04:47PM
Hah! They should leave up one solitary cable lying against the granite, so that you have to pull yourself up the way the Goatie did in those "Diving Board Trip" photos. Imagine the enhanced self-satisfaction you would get apon arrival at the top (should you live through it) I have been working on upper body strength for a year, now, -- I would love to give this off-season insanity a shot!

Busy Bee
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 05:12PM
Quote
Bee
Hah! They should leave up one solitary cable lying against the granite, so that you have to pull yourself up the way the Goatie did in those "Diving Board Trip" photos. Imagine the enhanced self-satisfaction you would get apon arrival at the top (should you live through it) I have been working on upper body strength for a year, now, -- I would love to give this off-season insanity a shot!

Busy Bee

If the single cable can allow someone to ascend outside the slick track created by the " tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free" it might actually be easier. It is clearly not much of a challenge to descend outside the cables when they are up.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 07:27PM
Decending on the north outside is the way to go.



Old Dude
Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 01:11PM
Quote
mrcondron
Decending on the north outside is the way to go.

Don't know if you guys have seen this, but here's what can happen when you go outside of the cables...

From the website...

"Man Slides down off the Cables - lives!

On October 1, 2006, 21-year-old Scott Clancy was ascending the cables on a drizzly autumn day. It was
damp, cold and chilly. He was wearing smooth soled shoes. Almost no one else was venturing to the
top on this blustery day. He went outside the cables when he passed a descending hiker over half the
way to the top. He lost his grip, slipped and fell nearly 200 feet. Horrified onlookers could do nothing.
Perhaps it was a stoney outcropping that snagged him and he finally stopped parallel to and about 60
feet to the right of the base of the cables. Beneath him lie a 2,000 foot drop and certain death. Nearby
hikers could do nothing but offer words of assurance. Help was summoned and a helicopter rescue
team dispatched. The man lay motionless while maintaining maximum friction with the surface to avoid
any further slippage. Rescuers attached ropes to the cables and rappelled out to him. They traversed
back, bringing the man to safety. He was unhurt, but near hypothermia as he waited hours for the
rescue team to arrive. Sonora resident David Wirtanen witnessed the fall and took these remarkable
photos. He said that there was absolutely nothing anyone could do to assist the man. Don't play the
lottery with your life. DO NOT go up if the rock is wet. Keep inside the cables. If you have any trepidation,
turn around; there will be many more opportunities."

See here for more...
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 02:31PM
"ascending the cables on a drizzly autumn day. It was
damp, cold and chilly. He was wearing smooth soled shoes. Almost no one else was venturing to the
top on this blustery day"

These are the operative words. The guy was asking for death but didn't get his wish.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/01/2009 02:31PM by mrcondron.
Re: Book on Half Dome
May 30, 2009 10:19PM
Quote
Frank Furter
Quote
Bee
Hah! They should leave up one solitary cable lying against the granite, so that you have to pull yourself up the way the Goatie did in those "Diving Board Trip" photos. Imagine the enhanced self-satisfaction you would get

If the single cable can allow someone to ascend outside the slick track created by the " tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free" it might actually be easier. It is clearly not much of a challenge to descend outside the cables when they are up.

A single cable outside the track is Ok for coming down; for going up, unless you go non-stop and fairly quickly, you have a worse disaster of a traffic jam than even imaginable with the current setup. Going up, the outside is handy for going around a slow or stopped person, but seldom do people make a nonstop bottom-to-top run up the outside. Most of us mortals have to rest along the way.

And then you've got only one cable? So you've got people going up and down the same cable, and that's supposed to be an improvement? Even worse, to get rid of the stanchions and boards and have the cable laying down? Lawyers would have a field day, and NPS would go broke, because they would have modified a working system into a hazard.

A lot of people go up with the cables down, but it's many times less safe, and if it rains, downright dangerous. There were two deaths a couple of years back from just that, and with two cables and experienced hikers. I don't know about 'the goatie' or what photos those are or if it's supposed to be some special technique he/she uses, but going up/cables down is pretty common in off-season. The granite gets very slippery when wet, and a mistake made with cables down might be a disaster, where with cables up it may be just a little slip and recovery.

I suppose they could just grease the cables and the granite, and no one could get up, so they'd go home.



Gary
Yosemite Photo Galleries: http://www.pbase.com/roberthouse/yo




Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/30/2009 10:23PM by Sierrafan.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 31, 2009 12:47PM
Dowwie hit Z proverbial Nail on the Head!

(although I still LOVE the Beesentials)
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
May 31, 2009 05:12PM
QWW Bee,

Wanna go here?

smiling smiley

Can watch the Lemmings climbing the dome all day...

avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 10:43AM
The QB loves hights and peaks! The higher the better...done those cable thingys already (highly overrated IMO) Soz I am ready for the next peak..!


Busy Bee
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 11:52AM
Try Mount Dana.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 02:32PM
Then eat at Taco Bell.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 02:33PM
Quote
mrcondron
Then eat at Taco Bell.

Ah...no thanks!
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 02:43PM
Well then at least carry an empty Taco Bell bag in the car.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 02:57PM
Quote
mrcondron
Well then at least carry an empty Taco Bell bag in the car.

That could be useful at times.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 03:04PM
Yeah... and there could be repurcussions too...
(and I'm fine and dandy going from 0 to 10K+... just need to STAY there!)
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 08:35PM
Quote
barfy-e-g
Yeah... and there could be repurcussions too...
(and I'm fine and dandy going from 0 to 10K+... just need to STAY there!)

bill-e-g + 10K - 10K + Taco Bell = vomit



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/01/2009 08:37PM by Bee.
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 09:10PM
+13.5K -13.5K in a day.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 01, 2009 09:50PM
Quote
Bee
bill-e-g + 10K - 10K + Taco Bell = vomit

That's what I heard!
avatar Re: Book on Half Dome
June 02, 2009 06:48PM
That is a REALLY nice picture Bill!
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