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Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings

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Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 02, 2011 08:10PM
I'm trying to think of as many skills as possible. Endurance, scrambling, rappelling, route finding, strength, x-countrying, friction walking, tech (compass/GPS/etc), doing stuff in the dark (what's a good word for that?), etc. How would you rank yourself on 1-10 scale (10 being best)?

I know this sounds nerdy and "D&D-ish." smiling smiley

For me: endurance 9.5, scrambling 6-7, rappelling 0, route finding 7.5 to 8, friction walking 8, tech 8.5, x-country 5, night travels 2-3, switchback/stairmaster stuff 9,



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/02/2011 09:03PM by Ohnivy-Drak.
avatar Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 06:59AM
For the ignorant please define friction walking and tech as it applies to your post.
Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 08:18AM
You left one out--having fun, without which the others don't mean a thing.

I am a ten in that.



Balzaccom

follow our adventures, read our blog, or just to come hang out at our website: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/
Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 08:29AM
Another valuable skill you forgot to list: Knowing When To Turn Back (frankly, that may be the MOST important one! (except, of course, for having fun Rolling on floor laugh))
avatar Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 09:38AM
Nose your limits.
Nose your skillz.
Don't punish yourself too far.
Be safe. Be prepared.
Have fun.

Since I gotz wingz... I'm Spinal Tap 11 on all those. tongue sticking out smiley
And 110% on Having Fun.

In all seriousness... a hugely important skill is to be able to correlate a good Topo map with
actual terrain. And that really only comes with a lot of practice out there.
Something that looks simple on the topo map... can be anything but.
Of course if you are only traveling on trail... the park map they give you may be plenty to get you
where you want to go. (depending on time of year... yadda yadda yadda)

Along with knowing your own limits... it's also v. important to know your parties limits!
Going on class 3+ stuff with someone who isn't adept can be recipe for disaster.

Chick-on is looking at you!



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 03:20PM
Quote
chick-on
Something that looks simple on the topo map... can be anything but.

And remember how much vertical distance those contour lines actually represent. Even a ten foot wall can mean you have to find another route.
Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 08:37AM
Actually, there are classifications existing - if you look at SAR terminology you end up with high angle, low angle, alpine (high elevation mountaineering), mountaineering (what we all think of as hiking with occasional use of nontechnical aids such as crampons or hiking poles) - all classifications require knowledge of how to use navigational aids and do night navigation....

For a grading of ascents check out the Yosemite Decimal System:
* Class 1: Walking with a low chance of injury.
* Class 2: Simple scrambling, with the possibility of occasional use of the hands. Little potential danger is encountered.
* Class 3: Scrambling with increased exposure. A rope can be carried but is usually not required. Falls are not always fatal.
* Class 4: Simple climbing, with exposure. A rope is often used. Natural protection can be easily found. Falls may well be fatal.
* Class 5: Technical free climbing involving rope, belaying, and other protection hardware for safety. Un-roped falls can result in severe injury or death.

Things like talus hopping and scree surfing (glissading, if you are talking about snow fields) fall somewhere in class 2 - class 4 depending on slope.

I am piss poor in some skills, and good at navigation, low angle, mountaineering and "not stepping on the wobbly one."
Re: Outdoor Skills & Rankings
November 03, 2011 02:35PM
Falls are not always fatal.


I love that line!



Balzaccom

follow our adventures, read our blog, or just to come hang out at our website: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/
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