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Re: Threading the Needle

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Threading the Needle
January 21, 2016 08:43PM
The forecast for the three day MLK Jr. weekend was rain/snow, some sun, then more rain/snow. As I waited for the advance party at the parking lot of the new Yosemite Valley Lodge, a fairly steady rain fell on the car.

Separately, we all thought Are we really doing this? No one was looking forward to a slog through cold, drizzly rain on both Saturday and Monday.

Based on the observation that it hadn't been raining at the Foresta trailhead--or anywhere other than near the Valley Lodge area--we decided to go ahead with our hike and headed to the trailhead. While it was windy, it was dry, but we still put on our rain gear and pack covers before hitting the trail.



We could see no signs that anyone else had broken the trail recently, but it was easy enough to follow the familiar trail--the snow wasn't so deep that it obscured it completely.

The threat of rain mostly dissipated, but we soon were walking in deep enough snow that it was time for the snowshoes to come off our packs.



We were concerned about two unbridged creek crossings: Tamarack Creek and Ribbon Creek. Neither had appeared to have much water in them based on our views from below, but deep snow can make water crossings tricky. Fortunately, Tamarack Creek was crossable with only a few steps into inch-deep water. (Note to self: waterproof boots are no longer waterproof...)



Shortly after crossing Tamarack Creek we stopped for lunch. It was already well past noon, and we were well off our summer hiking pace. The snow was deep and snowshoeing through it was slow. A bit after lunch a few sprinkles briefly fell on us; this "shower" was done by the time we were at the Cascade Creek bridge, where any footprints from the Great Pink One's Thanksgiving trip were buried under many feet of snow.



While we were dry, a fog was closing in, giving the forest around us a distinctly coastal feel.



After a slow and steep climb through deep snow, we emerged at what in summer would be open granite, but now was a vast expanse of open snow.



We trudged up the hillside for a few hundred feet, but we were running out of daylight. We stopped to camp at a flat enough spot near a small--but running--stream.



Besides the luxury of running water, the campsite was protected from the wind and had excellent views of the sunset.





We (or at least I) were beat and were ready for a good night's rest--and I was quite relieved that we wouldn't have to go through the ritual of melting enough snow to make 6-9 liters of water. Our progress had been slow, and we had a lot of distance to cover in the next two days. But, the forecast rain never impacted us, so we were grateful for the weather.



We of course had our usual breakfast of pancakes and bacon the next morning. As we finished the sun started to hit the tent. It was filtered a bit by thin clouds, but it was still welcome. Even better--the previous night had been cold enough that the snow we had been sinking many inches into the previous evening was in most places firm enough to walk on.



We had several hundred feet of climbing to the high point on the trail between Cascade and Ribbon Creek, but we made good process and the firm snow mostly held out on us.



This section of the trail is intermittently marked by red metal flags that do not appear to have been intended for winter travel--many were only a foot above the snow. A dead snag with such a flag marked the top of our climb.



Unfortunately the snow in the forest around Ribbon Meadow was not at all firm, except where the damp snow falling from trees had frozen into ice. Near the meadow we left the forested trail to enjoy some views and sunshine--and deep snow.



We made slow progress through the meadow and stopped for lunch on the far side of it during a moment when it was sunny. Just as we finished lunch grey clouds closed in around us. We continued along, eventually reaching Ribbon Creek, which was fortunately easily crossed on a substantial 8' thick snow bridge.



Unfortunately there was no easy way to fill up on water here, so we continued on. We eventually reached a portion of the trail where we could see the side of El Capitan, much of which was covered by blue and white ice.



The last bit of trail to the top of El Captain in summer is a pleasant, almost level traverse. That trail was completely buried in deep--and firm--snow. We opted to head more up than across, since a slip would send us back down to--and past--the icicles we had seen a bit ago.



There was a fairly strong breeze on the summit of El Capitan, and it took awhile for us to select a campsite and decide on a tent orientation. Eventually we had a location, a flattened platform, and an erect tent.



Since we were nowhere near running water, we had a lot of snow-melting chores to do as we unpacked and prepared hot tea and dinner. As with the previous day we hadn't made many miles, but what distance we had made had been hard work, and once more I looked forward to a good night's sleep--especially since we knew we had to get an early start the next morning to make it out by dark.



Early in the morning our tent was hit by hard gusts of wind, and a bit later we could hear snow and ice being blown against it. We were up before 6:00am and made coffee, breakfast burritos, and packed while snow fell on us. A few times, it was silent, making us think the snow had stopped. Instead, enough had fallen on the tent that the new snow no longer made a sound. That morning several inches of new snow fell on us; despite brushing snow off the tent several times, it stayed dry for only a few minutes.



The wind was still blowing hard as we packed and finally hit the unseen trail. Fortunately the wind was mostly at our back as we trudged through deep snow in near-whiteout conditions.



The snow and wind slowly grew less and less intense, and near a particular landmark we call "Little Half Dome" the storm seemed to be over.



The clouds had lifted enough that we could see the far side of the valley--where we had been camping a few weekends ago.



A bit farther along, we were treated to bits of blue sky and views of even more distant familiar landmarks.



Not long after that, the sky was almost completely clear, more deep blue than white cloud, and the sun made us uncomfortably warm. The "rain" gear soon came off.



We paused for numerous photos as we headed towards Eagle Peak, where JKW would complete the El Capitan - Eagle Peak Trail Quest segment.



After a steep climb through deep snow we were at the saddle north of Eagle Peak, and after dropping a bit we were at the junction, its signs now completely buried by the snow. Trail Quest segment finished.*



The snow through and around Eagle Meadows was deep and soft, and the only hints of trail were an occasional ancient blaze or large, cut logs completely covered by snow.



At one point we passed a large set of icicles that looked more like flowstone you might see in a cavern.



After Eagle Meadows we had a steep drop to Yosemite Creek; since this trail segment was officially checked off by the Trail Quest judges, our fearless leader opted for some off-trail deep-powder fun.



Most of our day had been above the fog that was invading Yosemite Valley, but just as we approached the trail junction at the top of the Yosemite Falls switchbacks, we entered the fog.



At this point we saw the only people--and footprints--we had seen (outside of our group) for the entire weekend. We still had over 3 miles back to our car, and the trail down was unfortunately slippery due to numerous day hikers having already slid down the trail.



We were in the fog for the top several hundred feet...



...and from the cliffs above us we could see and hear ice occasionally fall towards the trail we would soon be on.



When we could eventually see Yosemite Fall, it was still in the sun.



The ice cone below it was taller than it had been a few months ago.



The forecast had been for near-certain precipitation for this day--it looked like the early morning storm had met this obligation, and the day would end with blue sky and sunshine.



We had managed to thread the weather needle; we had only a few hours of precipitation during the entire weekend, which we would learn was much less than many other places that also lacked views of Yosemite Valley.



Oh, and JKW executed a most excellent faceplant on the driest, smoothest, and most level section of trail, but I'll leave that story for her to tell :-)

* While some may argue we didn't completely follow the trail, I am not aware of any photographic evidence of us not on the trail.



More Pictures
Re: Threading the Needle
January 21, 2016 10:52PM
You certainly are dedicated. Awesome pix, as usual. I wish you luck on your quest. thumbs up
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 06:51AM
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak
You certainly are dedicated. Awesome pix, as usual. I wish you luck on your quest. thumbs up

It's not dedication. Itz purty much an unbridaled pashun for the mountains. Itz beauty.
Itz challenges. Just being out there. This trip was more of a "let's just go and see" ...
Worse case is we get going... it gets ugly... and we head back home...
Thing is... too many times... dis birdie has not going up on a "bad weather" weekend...
and looked far too longingly at the webcam on Sunday morning... with tear in eye.
So... since we all wanted to get back out there... Off we went.
In the past I personally have been told "even the bears hibernate in winter"...
meh! a) they don't .. and 2) purty much said ... that's nice... bye... not gonna
bother with this forum anymore tongue sticking out smiley
Truth is... the way we do things ... and it's just a joy... is we have din din... watch a
show or two... chat a bit... all in the tent... and pretty soon it's 9, 10 oclock...
and it's not really much different than any "in season" trip...
Anywho... dats my storee...

Have fun
Chick-on is looking at you!



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 10:17AM
What the bird sez and...

Okay, yah, we all wondered "we're really doing this?", but as both Chick-on and Basilbop said, we decided to go for it and see. And I'm glad we did!

  • Big steps - When we started, we just walked in the dirt/snow. Kahtoolas and snowshoes were on the pack. Heavy. I was low-energy. That was a hard fought 2000+' vertical gain day for me. Only 5 miles. Sheesh. The guys were taking big steps early on and when the snow was deeper, I tried to follow their footsteps. Bad idea. I was doing what I could... but at one point they got cute and took huge steps. When I came up to them, I just stopped and stared. Could not believe what they were doing! I had to plow my own way. But by then, I'd already kinda screwed up...
  • Slow going - ...I kinda tweaked a muscle in my hip following the earlier "big" steps. . Old injury flared up again. I had to nurse it after that, and took short steps but it's hard when the holes in the snow want to throw you into existing footsteps! I was lurching from deep snow to pounded footprints, I couldn't find a rhythm. Oh well. But by the time we were heading up the ridge, I was in a fair bit of pain and was hoping it would just go away by morning. I was more than happy when they guys said it was a good spot to camp...
  • Gorgeous night - and it was fantastic. GREAT views, running water nearby, and the night turned out to be spectacularly clear and gorgeous!
  • Ascenders rule - Next morning, going up the final bit of the ridge, it was still steep, but the snow was crusted and strong. I used the ascenders on the snowshoes and could take my happy little steps and putt up the hill. I didn't care how steep it was! I could keep my heart rate and stride under control and just enjoyed the climb! I knew it wouldn't last, but man, it was nice while it did!
  • Tricky traverse - after worrying about crossing Ribbon for most of the day and then feeling relief when I saw that thick snow-bridge... the next crux was the traverse. We weren't sure what it would be like. I wish we'd had our ice axes just in case (self-arrest), but hey, we didn't. So we carefully went up and across the traverse. Side-hilling is hard enough for me, side-hilling with snow-shoes was extra fun, since I was trying to push my shoes' teeth into the icy snow to grab well. three points of contact and progress was made safely, albeit rather slowly. And I loved our second night's spot too! GREAT views until the clouds and storm hit.
  • Storm! - sometime not long after midnight? ... the winds picked up and the snow was blowing and we got a bit of spindrift. Note to self - turn shoes upside down or otherwise protect from spindrift filling them up - all our shoes were full of snow in the morning! And packing up and leaving as it was blowing was a fun challenge. And it really started blowing just as I was walking. The first bit... it seemed was sideways to my face and I realized I should have pulled the buff over the lower part of my face - about the only exposed skin I had. We found a tree for a bit of shelter and I readjusted. And frankly, for as stormy as it was, our gear worked and I was actually fine working my way through the near blizzard conditions. I'm not sure how strong the winds were, but if they hit forecasts, I think it qualified as a blizzard. Felt like it, anyway.
  • Gorgeous! - but when it cleared... WOW!!! gorgeous. Simply gorgeous! Cannot describe how lovely it was. The pictures don't do it justice. You can't get that sense of being surrounded by all that beauty from a pic on a screen. Which is why we go through the effort of getting out there...
  • Steep! - on the way down from Eagle Meadows, we left the trail and yah, took a steep off-trail route. Chick-on plunge-stepped down trying to make a decent path for me. But the way the snow was acting, I was left with a narrow slot with teeny partial steps down. yah, I had some trouble. Tweaked my knee a bit. Was limping a bit for a bit for a while until we hit smoother terrain and I could work it out. Did I mention...? My hip and back pain from Day 1 was gone by morning! Yay!
  • Slippery! - the top portion of the Yosemite Falls trail. Sheesh. if only folks with snowshoes had broken the trail, we would have been golden. But no. It was a narrow chute barely big enough to walk in with kahtoolas. and you could see nasty post-hole marks off-center. Sigh. And it had soft snow over the harder stuff and even with kahtoolas, I slipped and fell three times on my pack. No harm, no foul, but I was trying to relax into the feeling of slipping... and finally did make some sort of peace with it.
  • Falling ice and snow! - on the way down the upper switchbacks, we heard and saw ice falling off the wall. Great... several of the switchback turns near the wall and almost the entire traverse showed signs of very active falls. We were lucky by the time we were there, the sun had moved on and the falls were few and far between. But it was still dicey crossing the clumpy ice/snow chunks. Again, ice axe would have been nice.
  • Face Plant! - Finally, I was done with the tricky bits. The "you really could get hurt" bits... We rounded the bend, I saw smooth, "dry" flat dirt trail and asked if we should take our Kahtoolas off, knowing there was one more teeny climb. Chick-on said let's keep them on til we're past that. I said OK. And then my right foot caught the ground and I fell on my face. Hard. It was over in a flash. I realized I was going down and turned my head at last second to avoid my nose getting crunched. But the right side of my face went into the ground, bounced up a bit and then got driven in again with the backpack whacking me for good measure! Joy. Once again, I asked for help getting my pack off. I laid there realizing my face was pressed into damp dirt and gave myself time to feel everything out. when I could confirm sensation everywhere, I gingerly got up. I probably should have let Basilbop give me a spinal check, but i kinda self-diagnosed myself on that score.

    And I got up slowly, testing myself as I went. I asked Basilbop to give me the cognitive tests for person, place, time, event and passed all that. No major concussion, no blackout, but it was a definite hit, and I realized I would be very sore soon. Luckily, my hat brim had folded over and protected my eye area from having dirt driven right in. And my glacier goggles' lens protected my eye, but the temple and frame hit my face and bent out badly and bruised and cut my face a bit around my eye. Oh well. It was dark enough for regular glasses by then anyway.

    Jeez. Brain fade. Simplest, easiest bit of trail. Relief at being done with the tricky stuff. Almost done with the entire trip. Of course. That's when it happens, for me, so far, at any rate, and frankly, if it's got to happen, I'll take that rather than having a real problem miles up and in the backcountry. But sheesh. Not having a brain-fade would be best!!! Sigh. Been beating myself up over it, but the guys have been telling me to stop that too. They and my PT have all been giving me their personal stories of stupid crap accidents. Well, I do know going in that what we do has inherent risk. I try to manage it the best I can. And sometimes, I screw up. Learn from it. But dang it, I'm going back out. Taking this weekend off to recover, though...
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 10:23AM
My heros.
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 02:56PM
Ouch on the fall! Hope all is okay!
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 23, 2016 07:29AM
Yikes! When I first read "faceplant" I was imagining you face first in several feet of nice powdery snow! Glad you are ok!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 23, 2016 11:43AM
Yah.. Well..I survived the first 24 hours after he concussion, so that's a win!

As I figured, I did suffer a concussion. Didn't have a lot of symptoms, but enough, and though I passed the eye tracking test on Wednesday, when I saw my doc Friday, I had a glitch. Just gotta take it easy for a couple of weeks. Muscles sore in neck, slight black eye, minor cuts around eye socket from sunglasses frames. Scraped knee.

Good thing I can't take non steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs)! On day of, I took Tylenol when we hit the car.. This happened above Columbia point, so I still had to get down a bunch of slippery rip rap and didn't want to get stupider on drugs. Kept taking Tylenol through the week.

Medical tip: Tylenol is safe to take for head injuries. You don't want to take NSDAIDs because they thin the blood and can cause more harm with brain trauma. More swelling..

If u ask me on a regular day, I know this cold. That day, I just wanted to stop the pain, and my default is Tylenol. Good thing!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 23, 2016 10:22PM
Quote
JustKeepWalking
Yah.. Well..I survived the first 24 hours after he concussion, so that's a win!

As I figured, I did suffer a concussion. Didn't have a lot of symptoms, but enough, and though I passed the eye tracking test on Wednesday, when I saw my doc Friday, I had a glitch. Just gotta take it easy for a couple of weeks. Muscles sore in neck, slight black eye, minor cuts around eye socket from sunglasses frames. Scraped knee.

Good thing I can't take non steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs)! On day of, I took Tylenol when we hit the car.. This happened above Columbia point, so I still had to get down a bunch of slippery rip rap and didn't want to get stupider on drugs. Kept taking Tylenol through the week.

Medical tip: Tylenol is safe to take for head injuries. You don't want to take NSDAIDs because they thin the blood and can cause more harm with brain trauma. More swelling..

If u ask me on a regular day, I know this cold. That day, I just wanted to stop the pain, and my default is Tylenol. Good thing!

So sorry to hear about the concussion, not a fun thing to have. Wishing you a rapid recovery.
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 21, 2016 11:54PM
Quote
basilbop
We of course had our usual breakfast of pancakes and bacon the next morning.

That needs a bit more: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/overnight-cinnamon-rolls-recipe.html
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 07:31AM
OK, I have to ask, when you folks say you have bacon, are you talking raw slices of bacon you have to sit/crouch there and slowly cook, or that Oscar Mayer ready-cooked stuff? Great trip report and bea-u-t-iful photos, thanks for sharing.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/22/2016 07:33AM by PineCone.
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 09:35AM
Coney,
Want sum?
tongue sticking out smiley



(full disclosure... this photo is not from this trip)

Actually... kinda irked at self for not taking picture of Jetboil hang-on kit in tent cooking bacon,
pancakes, and breakfast burritos... had to eat crow on the Jetboil hanging kit and admit...
Z Old Stick N Fedder was not nuts...
And I ordered a hang-on kit for myself ...

O... the answer is ... it's the pre-cooked kind..
smiling smiley



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 09:52AM
What, no syrup? tongue sticking out smiley
OK, thank Ye, that's a very impressive operation/set-up for a little ol' backpacking tent way out in the hinterlands.
I have an elaborate campsite set-up when I stay in the Valley (that makes a High Sierra Camp look downright Spartan by comparison), and even I use the pre-cooked bacon (no muss, no fuss).
However, I would have felt ashamed if you were backpacking fresh bacon in for miles, and I was too lazy to cook it in my campsite. Thanks for making me feel better! grinning smiley
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 09:58AM
Quote
PineCone
What, no syrup? tongue sticking out smiley
D

There is a syrup story that goes back years. I'll let Chick-on tell it.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 04:56PM
Quote
mrcondron
Quote
PineCone
What, no syrup? tongue sticking out smiley
D

There is a syrup story that goes back years. I'll let Chick-on tell it.

The current chapter is...

I conveniently "forgot" the mapley syrup in the fridge at home.... and had to get
"The Good Stuff" from Yosemite Village Store for this trip. tongue sticking out smiley

The plot syrup thickens?

tongue sticking out smiley



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 23, 2016 07:13AM
Quote
chick-on
Quote
mrcondron
Quote
PineCone
What, no syrup? tongue sticking out smiley
D

There is a syrup story that goes back years. I'll let Chick-on tell it.

The current chapter is...

I conveniently "forgot" the mapley syrup in the fridge at home.... and had to get
"The Good Stuff" from Yosemite Village Store for this trip. tongue sticking out smiley

The plot syrup thickens?

tongue sticking out smiley

And even you agreed the pure organic maple syrup I foisted on you had a better flavor than the corn syrup-based stuff from the Village store!

Admit it, it's tasty!!!
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 24, 2016 09:49AM
Quote
JustKeepWalking
And even you agreed the pure organic maple syrup I foisted on you had a better flavor than the corn syrup-based stuff from the Village store!

Admit it, it's tasty!!!

Foist. hehehe... at least your mostly honest

Foist: to pass off as genuine or worthy

tongue sticking out smiley

As Z Old Stick n Fedders sez : It's not bad



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 11:19AM
Quote
chick-on
O... the answer is ... it's the pre-cooked kind..

Specifically, the pre-cooked bacon that has "Refrigerate after opening" on the package--even though it's in the fridge in most stores.
Re: Threading the Needle
January 23, 2016 10:53PM
Just curious to what size that pan is? Considering getting one myself and saw that MSR had a 7 and 9 inch one. Might be able to put the 9 inch model over the lid of the bear can for easier packing..
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 24, 2016 10:07AM
Quote
KevinD
Just curious to what size that pan is? Considering getting one myself and saw that MSR had a 7 and 9 inch one. Might be able to put the 9 inch model over the lid of the bear can for easier packing..

That's Z Stick N Fedders pan. Since 9" won't fit into a Bearikade. My guess is that it is 8".
We have been using a slightly thicker pan as of late (somehow my pack continues to get
heavier... and I can't quite figure out why) ... it is also 8". I would go with 7" if the pan
has vertical sides. I wouldn't go with 9" simply because ... well.. I want it to fit in the bear can
once the Twikie stash is down. Of course with 7" vertical pan you may have more
trubbles flipping jacks... btw... the super small spatula works a treat (of course I can neither
find the pan I have nor the spatula on z web fur sale)

Sorry if doesn't help much. Really happy with the thick pan I have...
(cue the music for Z Old Dood to tell you how he cut the sides off of a "regular pan" to
make a skillet) tongue sticking out smiley
(gotta give him some props tho... he did fashion a spatula out of a piece o wood
many years ago when I forgot said device at home)

(I don't make this stuff up)




Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 27, 2016 01:14AM
thanks for the input! Checked out those MSR pans at REI and felt they were too thin. Might just go with a heavier but thicker ikea pan!

-Kevin
Re: Threading the Needle
January 27, 2016 07:22AM
REI has thicker pans than the disappointing MSR pan. IIRC, the REI pans are thicker... And the ones in the GSI kits, not sure which ones, felt a tad thicker..

I was looking for potential replacements in case the non-stock wears off, but Chick-on is careful and the pan is in good shape..

*edited: "pansy ham" made no sense. Using phone to post..



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/27/2016 09:05AM by JustKeepWalking.
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 27, 2016 11:33AM
Quote
JustKeepWalking
"pansy ham"

That sounds like a disparaging nickname for the pre-cooked bacon! tongue sticking out smiley
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 02:51AM
Congrats to JKW for completing the segment...and I look forward to hearing the face plant story!
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 06:56AM
Quote
basilbop

* While some may argue we didn't completely follow the trail, I am not aware of any photographic evidence of us not on the trail.

Well......



...

Look on the bright side... I had fun being off trail... tongue sticking out smiley

... and you get to go back to get ... "Two Tents of a mile"



Of course the beauty of it all was... of course... I was proven correct that the Upper Reaches of Yosemite Falls Trail
contained no rip-rip. tongue sticking out smiley

Just a great trip... Thanks sew much...



Chick-on is looking at you!



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 07:53AM
Great trip report, and awesome photos. Thanks! And I'm also curious about the bacon.
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 02:56PM
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 04:59PM
Is this the price is right?

$3.99, $5.99, $4.49

With a "final cost" of $1.99.

tongue sticking out smiley



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 03:08PM
New quest: dig into the snow, find and uncover all the benchmarkers!

Scary face grinning smiley
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 05:00PM
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak
New quest: dig into the snow, find and uncover all the benchmarkers!

Scary face grinning smiley

Don't even go there...

Or just cue the video!

(Fifty-Eight Shades of Cherry)

grrrrrr!!!!!!!!!



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Threading the Needle
February 03, 2016 04:14PM
Quote
chick-on
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak
New quest: dig into the snow, find and uncover all the benchmarkers!

Scary face grinning smiley

Don't even go there...

Or just cue the video!

(Fifty-Eight Shades of Cherry)

grrrrrr!!!!!!!!!



Dig 'em up, you can do it! Dancing GIrl Grinning Devil
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 03:18PM
Thanks for sharing! Trip looked great except for the crossings. I'd hate to have wet boots in the winter haha. I find that I have to wash down my goretex boots with soap after every trip to prevent the liners from wearing down. My other boots liners failed after 2 trips. So far my current ones replaced on warranty have been going strong for the season thankfully.

-Kevin
avatar Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 03:33PM
Another fantastic trip report! Many thanks!
Re: Threading the Needle
January 22, 2016 06:08PM
Great trip report. Thanks.
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