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Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)

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avatar How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 28, 2011 05:43PM
Here's another fascinating read (at least to me) from the 1920 Yosemite Park Rules and Regulations brochure.

It describes in detail, various ways (and the cost of the associated fares) of reaching Yosemite National Park back in 1920:

Quote
Rules and Regulations Yosemite National Park 1920 - Open All Year

HOW TO REACH THE PARK.


EL PORTAL ROUTE—"THE GATEWAY."

IN AND OUT VIA EL PORTAL—OPEN ALL YEAR.


The park is reached from Merced, Calif., on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and the Southern Pacific Railroads, thence by way of the Yosemite Valley Railroad to El Portal, near the western boundary of the park.

From El Portal the Yosemite National Park Co. operates an automobile line into the valley.

When entering the park via Merced the passenger has the choice of leaving via Hetch Hetchy, Lake Tahoe, Stockton, or Wawona.

Fares.

One way. Round trip (May 1 to June 30). Round trip (July 1 to Oct. 1).
Merced, via El Portal to Yosemite Valley $9.75 $13.50 $11.00
To the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees, round trip, from Merced, via El Portal, including Yosemite Valley, Artist and Inspiration Points; returning via Wawona and Glacier Point ---- 22.00 19.50
Special fares (individual tickets).

From San Francisco—To the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees, round trip, from Sail Francisco, via Merced, El Portal, Yosemite Valley, Artist and Inspiration Points; returning via Wawona and Glacier Point $25.50
From Los Angeles—To the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees, round trip, from Los Angeles, via Merced, El Portal, Yosemite Valley, Artist and Inspiration Points; returning via Wawona and Glacier Point 32.90
Time limits are from 15 to 90 days, dependent upon type of ticket.

No additional transportation charge is made for including Glacier Point in the tour to the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees and return to Yosemite Valley. A night's stay at Glacier Point should be planned to view the firefalls, sunrise, and sunset.

If desired, one may return over any one of four different routes for a small additional charge, insuring a continuous change of scene for the entire journey. If decided after reaching Yosemite, to return by another route, an adjustment of tickets can be made at the transportation offices of the Yosemite National Park Co. without trouble or loss, so that any of these trips may be taken at a minimum cost.

IN AND OUT VIA MARIPOSA AND WAWONA.

The park may also be reached from Merced by automobile stage to Mariposa and Wawona, thence to the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees and the Yosemite Valley. The Yosemite Stage & Turnpike Co. operates this line. The fare for the trip from Merced to the valley is $15 or $24.50 round trip. This same trip, not including the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees, can be made for $14.25 either way. A side trip to Glacier Point in connection with either of the above trips between Yosemite Valley and Merced via this line may be made at an additional cost of $5.



IN VIA EL PORTAL, OUT VIA WAWONA AND MARIPOSA, OR VICE VERSA.

Tickets may be procured at a very large number of points in Cali Valley, going in via El Portal (Yosemite Valley Railroad, Merced to El Portal), thence to the valley by automobile line of the Yosemite National Park Co., and returning via Wawona and Mariposa Big Trees to Merced by motor stage line of the Yosemite Stage & Turnpike Co, or the trip may be made in the reverse direction. This route is known as the Horseshoe Route. Side-trip tickets from Merced for this route may be purchased at Merced, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Sacramento.


THE HETCH HETCHY ROUTE.

IN AND OUT VIA HETCH HETCHY—OPEN MAY 15 TO OCTOBER 1.


A side trip from Oakdale, Calif., on the lines of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Railroads, thence, by way of the Sierra Railway and the Hetch Hetchy Railway, to the Hetch Hetchy Valley, the terminus of this line in the Yosemite National Park. From Hetch Hetchy Valley and return via rail motor, nine miles to Mather Station, from which point stages of the Yosemite National Park Co. operate direct to the floor of the Yosemite Valley.

When entering the park via Hetch Hetchy, the passenger has the choice of leaving via Lake Tahoe, Merced, Stockton or Wawona.

Fares.

One way. Round trip.
From Oakdale to Yosemite, via Hetch Hetchy, passing the Tuolumne Grove of Big Trees $12.05 $16.80
A detour may be made from Hetch Hetchy to Lake Eleanor and return
5.00
A side trip from Yosemite Valley may be made to the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees via Artist and Inspiration Points, returning via Wawona and Glacier Point to Yosemite
$10.00
No additional transportation charge is made for including Glacier Point in this tour.
Time limits are from 15 to 90 days, dependent upon type of ticket.

If desired, one may return over any one of four different routes, for a small additional charge, insuring a continuous change of scene for the entire journey. If decided, after reaching Yosemite, to return by another route, an adjustment of tickets can be made at the transportation office of the Yosemite National Park Co. without trouble or loss, so that any of these trips may be taken at a minimum cost.

THE STOCKTON ROUTE.

IN AND OUT VIA TUOLUMNE GROVE OF BIG TREES.


From Stockton, Calif., on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Railroads, and at the terminus of river boats on the San Joaquin River, a side trip by auto stages to the floor of Yosemite Valley, including Priest, Groveland, Carl Inn, and the Tuolumne Grove of Big Trees may be made.

The passenger has the choice of leaving Via Hetch Hetchy, Merced, Lake Tahoe, or Wawona.

FARE.

One way. Round trip.
Stockton to Yosemite Valley $15.16 $24.25
If desired, one may return over any one of four different routes, for a small additional charge, insuring a continuous change of scene for the entire journey. If decided, after reaching Yosemite, to return by another route, an adjustment of tickets can be made at the transportation offices of the Yosemite National Park Co. without trouble or loss, so that any of these trips may be taken at a minimum cost.

LAKE TAHOE ROUTE.

IN AND OUT VIA THE TIOGA PASS—OPEN ABOUT JULY 1.


A side trip from Truckee, Calif., on the main line of the Southern Pacific Railroad, via the Lake Tahoe Railroad to Tahoe; then by stages of the Yosemite National Park Co. to the floor of the Yosemite Valley, passing Minden, Nev.; Bridgeport, Mono Lake, Leevining Creek Canyon, Tioga Pass (altitude 10,000 feet), Tuolumne Meadows, Sierra Club Lodge, Lake Tenayn, Lake Tenaya Lodge, and the Tuolumne Grove of Big Trees.

The passenger has the choice of leaving via Hetch Hetchy, Merced, Stockton, or Wawona.

Fares.

One way.
Truckee to Yosemite Valley, via Lake Tahoe $36.50
Leaving via Hetch Hetchy to Oakdale 12.05
Leaving via El Portal to Merced 9.75
Important side trips.

At Tahoe, a boat ride around the lake $2.50
From Yosemite to the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees via Artist and Inspiration Points; returning via Wawona and Glacier Point 10.00
No additional charge is made for including Glacier Point in this tour.
Time limits are from 15 to 90 days, dependent upon type of ticket.

If desired, one may return over any of four different routes, for a small additional charge, insuring a continuous change of scene for the entire journey. If decided, after reaching Yosemite, to return by another route, an adjustment of tickets can be made at the transportation offices of the Yosemite National Park Co. without trouble or loss, so that any of these trips may be taken at a minimum cost.

The Tioga Road forms a link in the increasingly popular route between Lake Tahoe and Yosemite. The distance from Yosemite Valley to the southern end of Lake Tahoe by auto road is 206 miles via Gardnerville, Minden, and the Kingsbury Grade, 225 miles via Carson City and the Kings Canyon Road, and about the same distance via Gardnerville and Myers. An additional 20-mile run from the lower end of the Lake takes the motorist to Tahoe Tavern, while other Tahoe resorts may be reached by shorter drives of various distances. The scenery along the route varies from the rugged broken high Sierra type along the Tioga Road, 46 miles of which lies within the boundaries of the Yosemite National Park, and reaches at Tioga Pass the Eastern Park Boundary, an elevation of 9,941 feet above the sea, to that of the semiarid regions around Mono Lake, Bridgeport, and the Carson River Valley in Nevada and that of the rolling timbered mountains surrounding Lake Tahoe. Motorists from Central California points traveling to Lake Tahoe via Placerville or Emigrant Gap may complete the circuit by going over the above described route in the reverse direction.

The roads indicated, as well as all other mountain roads in Yosemite National Park, are kept in good condition during the summer months and are being gradually improved. Although heavy grades will be encountered, as is the case on all mountain roads, fear of serious difficulties need not be entertained.




DETAILED TRAVEL INFORMATION.

For further information regarding railroad fares, service, etc., apply to railroad ticket agents or address C. S. Fee, passenger traffic manager, Southern Pacific Lines, San Francisco, Calif.; or W. J. Black, passenger traffic manager, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, Chicago, Ill.

MISCELLANEOUS AUTOMOBILE ROUTES.

Automobiles and other vehicles may enter from Fresno, Madera, Merced, and other points south and west of the park Via Wawona and the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees; from the east via the Tioga Road, which is reached at Mono Lake from Lake Tahoe on the north, Tonopah, Nev., on the east, and Mojave, Big Pine, and Bishop, Calif., on the south; and from the north and west the park may be reached via the Big Oak Flat and Coulterville Roads from Stockton, Modesto, Merced, etc. See map in center of this circular.

No positive date can be given for the opening of the mountain roads leading to Yosemite. However, the following dates are approximately correct:

The Big Oak Flat Road opens May 15 and closes November 1. The Tioga Road opens July 15 and closes September 30. The Wawona Road opens May 1 and closes November 1. The El Portal and Valley Roads are open all the year, except occasionally during the winter when Valley Roads may be blocked with snow for short periods. This occurs rarely, however, as the roads are cleared promptly with snow plows.

Immediately upon the opening of any of the roads to Yosemite the automobile associations of California are notified, and from them tourists can obtain information.

For the convenience of automobilists who wish to avoid driving over mountain roads, a freight rate of $12.85, including war tax, per automobile between Merced and El Portal has been established by the Yosemite Valley Railroad Co. By this means tourists may have their own machines for use in the park.

The Southern Pacific and Santa Fe systems sell through rail and stage tickets, and baggage is checked through to Yosemite. Free allowance on railroads for 150 pounds; on stages, 50 pounds for each full-paid fare, 25 pounds for each half fare; excess baggage, 1 cent per pound. Freight rates between El Portal and Yosemite, $8 per ton for carload lots, $10 per ton for less than carload.

The regular tourist season extends from May 1 to November 1, but the park is always accessible. The park superintendent lives there the year around. In the Yosemite Valley the hotel is open through the winter to those who desire to view the wonderful spectacle of snow. Above the valley, however, winter conditions are severe and none but hardened and practiced mountaineers will make the venture. Motorists may not be sure of finding the Tioga Road free of snow before July 15.

During the season accommodations may be had in well-kept hotels, camps and lodges. The National Park Service is promoting the increase of hotel facilities to meet the rapid increase in the number of visitors.


NPS.GOV/YOSE: Yosemite Rules and Regulations 1920 Brochure - How To Reach the Park



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/28/2011 07:28PM by plawrence.
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 28, 2011 06:00PM
90days? sign me up
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 28, 2011 06:51PM
For comparison, an average automobile was $250. One gallon of gas was 22 cents.
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 29, 2011 09:10PM
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak
One gallon of gas was 22 cents.

And the average hourly wage was what?
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 29, 2011 09:34PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak
One gallon of gas was 22 cents.

And the average hourly wage was what?

Or look at the prices of the train/stage fares.

Back in 1920, a round trip ticket from Stockton to Yosemite Valley was $24.25

Today, via Amtrak it's as low as $39.60 round trip.

Not even double the cost -- quite remarkable considering the amount of inflation that the U.S. has endured from 1920 to 2011.
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
August 06, 2011 09:28PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak
One gallon of gas was 22 cents.

And the average hourly wage was what?

A quick search yielded that it was 60 cents in the manufacturing industry. As plawrence stated, it's remarkable that ticket costs for transportation have remained low. I'd guesstimate the avg price for a car today is $20K, practically worth an infinite amt of trips to the Park.
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 30, 2011 07:22AM
A little bit OT, but I found a ticket to Disneyland from when I was a kid.

Children 3-11 = $3.75
Adults = $4.75

How much is a day pass now?
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 30, 2011 09:41AM
One day at Disneyland now costs $80 for ages 10 and older, $74 for ages 3-9, under 3 get in free.
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 30, 2011 02:02PM
Quote
SierraGold
How much is a day pass now?

Free if you know the right person.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/30/2011 02:02PM by eeek.
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 30, 2011 02:59PM
$2.50 for a boat ride at Tahoe. Wow! The price now is $39.00.
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 30, 2011 06:38PM
Quote
Louis
$2.50 for a boat ride at Tahoe. Wow! The price now is $39.00.

Get old. The cost of the National Park system is $10 for life. Wait, I'd rather pay more and be younger.



Old Dude
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
July 30, 2011 07:37PM
Quote
mrcondron
Quote
Louis
$2.50 for a boat ride at Tahoe. Wow! The price now is $39.00.

Get old. The cost of the National Park system is $10 for life. Wait, I'd rather pay more and be younger.

At 72 I guess I have fulfilled that suggestion. I agree...I'd rather be younger and pay full price...and have fewer aches and pains too. smiling smiley
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
August 06, 2011 07:20PM
In case anyone is interested, during The Depression of the 1930s, the Federal Writers' Project produced road guidebooks for all of the states as well as Alaska and Hawaii. The one for California included sections on Yosemite and Sequoia. You might be able to find a copy in your local library. I know that the library of the Sierra Club (at their headquarters on 2nd Street in San Francisco) has a copy because I donated one to their collection several years ago. The information below has been lifted from their online listing of titles:

Title Statement: California; a guide to the Golden state.
Author: Federal Writers' Project. California.
Published: New York, Hastings House 1939
Series: (American guide series)
General Note: 713 p.
Subject: Automobiles--Road guides.
Subject: California.
Subject: California--Description and travel--Guidebooks
Call Number: 917.94 F317c

(A quick websearch shows that it is available online from used book sources in the original 1939 edition as well as later editions.)

Federal Writers' Project: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Writers'_Project
American Guide Series: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Guide_Series
Sierra Club Colby Library: http://www.sierraclub.org/library/
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
August 06, 2011 07:52PM
Quote
szalkowski
In case anyone is interested, during The Depression of the 1930s, the Federal Writers' Project produced road guidebooks for all of the states as well as Alaska and Hawaii. The one for California included sections on Yosemite and Sequoia. You might be able to find a copy in your local library. I know that the library of the Sierra Club (at their headquarters on 2nd Street in San Francisco) has a copy because I donated one to their collection several years ago. The information below has been lifted from their online listing of titles:

Title Statement: California; a guide to the Golden state.

For those interested in a slightly later guide (1948) of the Golden State in a video format (flim), here it is:


Bee Presents
avatar Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
August 07, 2011 02:00PM
Re: How To Reach The Park (circa 1920)
August 07, 2011 09:43PM
IN a related story...when we moved into our 1891 house, we were given a book about the family that built it. One of the chapters told the story of how, in the very early 1900's, they travel by WAGON from Napa to Yosemite to see the park, via the Big Oak Flat Road. Quite a charming read....and full of interesting notes about camping beside a river or bayou in the Central Valley.

It took them a bit more than a week in each direction---which seems to me to be pretty good speed. AFter all, I think it is around 190 miles one way!



Balzaccom

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