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Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail

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avatar Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:10AM
i have never done this trail, but from what i hear, it's really brutal.... along with a number of other boys and leaders, i'm suppose to take some 16-17 yr old boys the last weekend of August (i'll assume it will be very hot then)... and i also hear that most of the trail is in the direct sun???? is that right?

i'd like to hear from anyone who has hiked this trail... what to expect... what to bring, what not to bring... these boys have hiked from the valley floor to Nevada Falls and back last year, but i'm concerned that the Yosemite Falls hike is too much for those not accustomed to hiking (especially in the direct sun if thats the case).

i've been told that these hikes are rated 1-5 (5 being the hardest), and that Yosemite Falls trail is a 5.

i'm not the leader nor the person in charge of this hike, but i have voiced my concerns to those who are in charge, suggesting a different hike etc, but they insist on this hike, even knowing some of the boys won't make it.

why you ask? they want to teach them a life lesson on how difficult things can be when they are unprepared etc ( i can think of other ways to do this lol).

i'm not looking forward to taking some kid back down the trail, and having to wait for others to complete the hike (if they do), and sit there for 8 hours!!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:23AM
Yes, it's uphill and it's sunny. But I wouldn't rate it as the hardest.

Quote

they want to teach them a life lesson on how difficult things can be when they are unprepared etc

Boy Sprouts?
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:49AM
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eeek
Yes, it's uphill and it's sunny. But I wouldn't rate it as the hardest.

Anything that begins from the Valley floor that gains 3000+ feet in elevation can be considered strenuous. Although for those that exercise regularly, they aren't so bad. You do come across people huffing/puffing, angry at the sun going up UYF. Some probably didn't do their research beforehand, start later when the sun is at its worst, and might not make it back down before darkness sets in.

Hardest might be something like Indian Canyon, but is that really considered a hike?
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:59AM
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Ohnivy-Drak
Hardest might be something like Indian Canyon, but is that really considered a hike?

Why wouldn't it?

Hardest IMO is the trail heading to Loch Tablae / Rodgers Canyon out of Pate Valley.
75 switchbacks ... and that's just the start.



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:59AM
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Ohnivy-Drak
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eeek

Yes, it's uphill and it's sunny. But I wouldn't rate it as the hardest.

Anything that begins from the Valley floor that gains 3000+ feet in elevation can be considered strenuous. Although for those that exercise regularly, they aren't so bad. You do come across people huffing/puffing, angry at the sun going up UYF. Some probably didn't do their research beforehand, start later when the sun is at its worst, and might not make it back down before darkness sets in.

Hardest might be something like Indian Canyon, but is that really considered a hike?


Overall, starting from the Valley floor, I would rate going to the top of Half Dome the hardest because of the elevation gain and the length of the hike. But at least you get to hike in the shade (or partial shade) along some areas of the trail.

For hiking just to the rim on a maintained trail, I would rate the Snow Creek Trail harder than the Upper Yosemite Falls Trail.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 06, 2011 01:13PM
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plawrence
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Ohnivy-Drak
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eeek

Yes, it's uphill and it's sunny. But I wouldn't rate it as the hardest.

Anything that begins from the Valley floor that gains 3000+ feet in elevation can be considered strenuous. Although for those that exercise regularly, they aren't so bad. You do come across people huffing/puffing, angry at the sun going up UYF. Some probably didn't do their research beforehand, start later when the sun is at its worst, and might not make it back down before darkness sets in.

Hardest might be something like Indian Canyon, but is that really considered a hike?


Overall, starting from the Valley floor, I would rate going to the top of Half Dome the hardest because of the elevation gain and the length of the hike. But at least you get to hike in the shade (or partial shade) along some areas of the trail.

Though not as common, I'm sure many have gone up to Clouds Rest from the Valley floor, eventually ending up at, say, Sunrise HSC?
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:33AM
What's the hardest out of curiosity?
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 04:01PM
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steelcup
What's the hardest out of curiosity?

Any trail crossing open granite while climbing steeply that you start at noon will become the hardest hike you have ever done.

Snow Creek trail meets this criteria - so do the switchbacks heading up to Nevada Falls. Did those yesterday before 10 am, was the nicest and easiest they have ever been. Tho the trailwork they did on that section last year helped.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:34AM
yeah, Boy Sprouts lol but some of these kids aren't real active in the troop, which means they rarely if ever go hiking, let alone a hike like this.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 10:34AM by forrestranger.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:43AM
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forrestranger
yeah, Boy Sprouts lol but some of these kids aren't real active in the troop, which means they rarely if ever go hiking, let alone a hike like this.

And after this hike they'll be dropping out. Sigh.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:39AM
There's always the option of going halfway, which is where you get the first (and perhaps, best) view of the waterfall along the trail. You can also do a bit of scrambling to an area near the base. The reward for going all the way up is limited as far as viewing the waterfall goes. If you do, it'd be a shame if you didn't continue onwards to Eagle Peak.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:00AM
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Ohnivy-Drak
If you do, it'd be a shame if you didn't continue onwards to Eagle Peak.

Eagle Peak itself is great... but...

The trail to Eagle Peak is ho hum IMO... The reward is spectacular... but why would you do that when
you can go look over the railing... and then go up to Yosemite Pt.



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:51AM
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chick-on
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Ohnivy-Drak
If you do, it'd be a shame if you didn't continue onwards to Eagle Peak.

Eagle Peak itself is great... but...

The trail to Eagle Peak is ho hum IMO... The reward is spectacular... but why would you do that when
you can go look over the railing... and then go up to Yosemite Pt.

Some UYF Photos
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:41AM
If you can't persuade the sadist among the leaders to do an other hike, then at least try to persuade them to start the hike very earlier in the morning, at first light — before sunrise. You could even convince them that having the young men get up at predawn hours for the hike will help build character.

But if the leaders insist on doing the hike in the middle of the day, I would recommend that you wash your hands of it and refuse to take part of this hike.

(I was going to suggest as an alternative a one-way hike starting at a Tioga Road trailhead and walking down to to the top of Yosemite Falls, then down to the valley. That would still be a nice long hike, but not as brutal. But by the sounds of it, I doubt the leaders of your hike would be interested in that.)
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:23AM
yeah, that's the other thing.... they don't plan on starting until 10 am! (which means 11 am). stupid stupid stupid imo.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 12:02PM
I'm typing this at 11:57 AM...radar looks pretty active over Yosemite right now:

NWS Radar Reno NV

Afternoon t-storms sometimes happen...perhaps you could point out the "Be Prepared" motto, starting early in the AM sounds like better preparation.

I hiked to the snow beyond Oh My Gosh Point in early March, and even then I found that trail pretty sun exposed once it leaves the oaks by the valley. But then, I don't handle heat that well.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 12:03PM by ttilley.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:04AM
Forrest,
The first portion up a bunch o switchers is in Black Oaks. So it's in the shade
nearly to Columbia Rock. Pray the black fries aren't bugging the crapola out of you in there...
The hike is worthwhile for sure all the way to Columbia Rock then Oh-My-Gosh Lookout and the
first grand view of the fall.
Beyond there it will all be in the sun... and it's a long way up still...

Good luck



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:24AM
i wasn't aware of the flies, i'll have to warn them about that.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:30AM
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forrestranger
i wasn't aware of the flies, i'll have to warn them about that.

Not sure how to predict them anymore. But I'd bring a headnet.
I say that I'm not sure.. b/c from my experience I've only been bothered in the late fall...
but... in the last couple of years I've been zinged in spring... and more recently
just a few weeks ago in Ansel Adams wilderness.

Maybe you can ask again closer to your hike to see if anyone is bothered by them on that
trail... a zillion people do that trail on a daily basis... so...



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 12:32PM
We just returned from a week in Yosemite. My 18 yo son and I hiked from Porcupine Creek to the Valley via UYF. The hike was beautiful for the first 7 miles, but from the top of UYF to the Valley was brutal. Walking over granite was difficult because of the uneven footing and the slipping. My husband and 13 yo son hiked from the Valley to UYF (round trip) last Weds., they started early and had a great time. Bring a hat, plenty of water, and sunscreen. If you are prepared, there should be no reason why 16-17 year old boys can't make it - even if they are out of shape they can walk slowly.

Good luck!!

P.S. No black flies, no mosquitoes anywhere in sight while we hiked the trail.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:16AM
I did this hike in early July 2011. Started 11:30am, was in direct sunlight 90% of the time. I'd say...the second half of the hike is basically unshaded.
I ran out of my 3 liters water right as I reached the top. Fortunately I refilled my h20 at the small stream @ the 95% mark.
I wish I would have brought a loose-fitting hat. I brought no hat. My scalp flaked off the following week.
Aside from the h2o, the most important thing I brought was a pair of trekking poles.

When I reached the top, I continued on to Yosemite Point, then turned around there. I totally missed the trail that I believe leads to the edge of the upper falls, though. I made it to the top and thought "Wow, I get to stand on this wood bridge, and I can also lay here on these slippery rock slabs that line the falls (not a brilliant idea)...meh".
Yeah, so when you reach the top, pause and look for the short trail I completely missed and passed. This is the part that I missed YoseFalls Overlook
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:43PM
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herosemblem
This is the part that I missed YoseFalls Overlook

There's already been a LOT of responses on this but here's my 2 cents, most specifically about the Overlook:

People without a fear of heights probably can't appreciate this. I'm getting better with heights and I basically started visiting Yosemite many years ago as a way to engulf myself in such exquisite beauty that I could put on the mindset to confront my fear of heights. That much said, if you have a bunch of young (and, presumably, at least potentially unruly) and inexperienced hikers, I would NOT recommend taking them down to the overlook. The "trail" is only a short series of granite steps but the steps are directly next to the final feet of the fall, there is no railing on the falls side (unless it's been built since I was last up there) and trying to "hang on" to the wall away from the creek is likely to put you in an angle where your weight distribution makes you MORE likely to slip into the waterfall. The view from the overlook IS fabulous and probably not scary people with a head for heights but, especially given that there have already been a couple of deaths at or near the top of YF this year, I'd be extremely hesitant to let a bunch of young kids down these steps...especially because, if your sadist of a leader insists on making this a mid-day hike, will probably be cranky, tired and possibly at least somewhat dehydrated (aka, not at their peak game) by the time they reach the top.

The trail itself, as others have said, is basically in three sections: LOTS of very short switchbacks (allbethey in the shade) up to Columbia Rock (IIRC, there are about 100 of them although every time I tried to count, I lost track long before I got through all of them). From Columbia, there are a few very sandy and more gentle switchbacks and then a fairly level section brings you around the cliff to where you get the first view of the bottom of the upper falls (you'll feel the falls roaring long before you see them). This is a FABULOUS payoff, by the way. Along the way, you may spot a short trail that will take you to an overlook of the lower falls. It's a bit steep but easily managed and I wouldn't worry about having the boys do that (although I seem to recall that the overlook is pretty small so you may have to go a few people at a time). I can't remember if there's a sign marking this trail.

The final section is another 75 or 100 short switchbacks...somewhat smoother and even step-like in places than the lower switchbacks but, in full sun in August, this will probably be very hot.

Good luck with this but, based on the descriptions of the boys you've given, I'm with the majority here in thinking this is not the best choice for this group.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 06, 2011 01:28PM
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DavidK42
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herosemblem
This is the part that I missed YoseFalls Overlook

There's already been a LOT of responses on this but here's my 2 cents, most specifically about the Overlook:

People without a fear of heights probably can't appreciate this. I'm getting better with heights and I basically started visiting Yosemite many years ago as a way to engulf myself in such exquisite beauty that I could put on the mindset to confront my fear of heights. That much said, if you have a bunch of young (and, presumably, at least potentially unruly) and inexperienced hikers, I would NOT recommend taking them down to the overlook. The "trail" is only a short series of granite steps but the steps are directly next to the final feet of the fall, there is no railing on the falls side (unless it's been built since I was last up there) and trying to "hang on" to the wall away from the creek is likely to put you in an angle where your weight distribution makes you MORE likely to slip into the waterfall. The view from the overlook IS fabulous and probably not scary people with a head for heights but, especially given that there have already been a couple of deaths at or near the top of YF this year, I'd be extremely hesitant to let a bunch of young kids down these steps...especially because, if your sadist of a leader insists on making this a mid-day hike, will probably be cranky, tired and possibly at least somewhat dehydrated (aka, not at their peak game) by the time they reach the top.

That first set of rails that turns the corner, taking you to that narrow staircase: the first time, it looked rather dubious. So I slowly tiptoed to get a peek of what was below on the other side. I'm not sure I would have had the nerve to go if that were a sheer drop-off instead of just the Overlook area.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 06, 2011 04:58PM
I write as someone who has a fear of heights/vertigo issue. My fear of heights is such that, when I did Half Dome in 2003, I deeply regretted it -- getting down was very tough for me and I felt lucky to get down safely.

That said, I did the Yosemite Falls hike this year, up to the overlook, and onto Yosemite Point, and I enjoyed it very much. There was a section near the overlook where there is a ledge, and the metal bar is on the inside rather than the outside of the trail. This made me nervous, but by looking directly at the hill and taking my time, I was able to do it easily in both directions. My advice to someone who did not want to do this part of the trail would be to skip it and head on up to Yosemite Point, where the view is superior to my thinking. I did not find the hike down the falls all that tedious. Rightly or wrongly, the Upper Yosemite Falls hike is one of those Yosemite rite of passages and, like many of them, it has some wonderful payoffs.

Next up for me in Yosemite is probably the North Dome hike.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 06, 2011 05:52PM
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DavidK42

Along the way, you may spot a short trail that will take you to an overlook of the lower falls. It's a bit steep but easily managed and I wouldn't worry about having the boys do that (although I seem to recall that the overlook is pretty small so you may have to go a few people at a time). I can't remember if there's a sign marking this trail.

Assuming that you are talking about the (unmarked) trail to Oh My Gosh point, I would not take even a medium sized group on it at the same time, nor would I take anyone I couldn't count on being completely well-behaved. The problem isn't so much the overlook itself, which is indeed small, but rather a short but very narrow section of the trail about 3/4 of the way down where a misplaced elbow could easily send someone flying off the cliff.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:43AM
I strenuously urge you to change your plans and do the vastly superior Four Mile Trail hike which is about 5 miles from the Yosemite Falls trailhead as the crow flies (maybe 10 miles driving). I say this because I've done both trails probably 80 times in my life. Yosemite Falls hike is extremely rocky, bad footing... terrible going downhill. The trail conditions are simply lousy, and the views are nothing spectacular. I cannot stress to you enough: going downhill on the Yosemite Falls trail is NOT pleasant.

On the other hand, the trail conditions on the Four Mile Trail are superb, the views are great (especially at the top, at Glacier Point) and the downhill isn't treacherous or especially hard on the knees. There's no comparison between the two trails in ease of footing, views and beauty. The elevation gain on The Four Mile Trail is about 3200 feet, with switchbacks all the way up. There's also a drinking fountain at Glacier Point.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:54AM
I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 11:55AM by Ohnivy-Drak.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 12:08PM
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Ohnivy-Drak
I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.

Aren't most of the final destinations of a day-hike reachable by automobile? Since the final destination of a day is usually the trailhead where one started one's day-hike? And even on a one-way day-hike, the final destination is usually a trailhead that's also accesible via an automobile.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 12:17PM
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Ohnivy-Drak
I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.

I kind of enjoy the Panorama Trail from Glacier Point to the Valley. I always take the tram up to Glacier Point early as possible then hike down.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 01:13PM
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Ohnivy-Drak
I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.
This one I am 110% in agreement with you. I want to hike up to GP and join the Tour Buses? I think not.

Now.... hiking it once the road closes. Now u a talking my lan-goo-age. wink



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 01:29PM
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chick-on
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Ohnivy-Drak

I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.

This one I am 110% in agreement with you. I want to hike up to GP and join the Tour Buses? I think not.

But couldn't you avoid most of the tour buses and their passengers by just taking the Pohono Trail right away from Glacier Point?

Sure, you'll have to walk past the gift shop, skirt the parking lot and cross Glacier Point Road, but in no time you'll be back alone on the Pohono Trail.

Or even a better option for you would be just to take the unmaintained trail that starts after the top of the last switchbacks of the Four Mile Trail and connects with the Pohono Trail just north of Sentinel Dome. You'll avoid Glacier Point completely that way! smiling smiley
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 01:34PM
Let face it.... I'm spoiled.
Been up at GP a few times with no one else around... It's purty darn kewl.
tongue sticking out smiley



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 01:56PM
Haven't been to GP yet in winter, but other heavily-visited points along that road are pretty cool in winter when nobody else is there.

Taft Point in March 2009...

avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 09:16PM
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chick-on

Let face it.... I'm spoiled.
Been up at GP a few times with no one else around... It's purty darn kewl.
tongue sticking out smiley

Hey, I don't need to wait for Glacier Point Road to be closed to have Glacier Point all to myself.

I've been there twice in the middle of July all by my lonesome (well, one time there was a bear nearby, and the other time a pair of ravens kept me company.)

Secret: get there early, at first light (or earlier). smiling smiley

One time, no one else showed up until after I had packed up my camera gear and was heading back to the parking lot about 30 minutes AFTER sunrise.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 12:02PM
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Ulysses61

I strenuously urge you to change your plans and do the vastly superior Four Mile Trail hike which is about 5 miles from the Yosemite Falls trailhead as the crow flies (maybe 10 miles driving).

The trailhead for the Four Mile Trail is less than one mile as the crow (or more appropriate for Yosemite, as the raven) flies from the Upper Yosemite Falls trailhead. It's even a less than a one mile hike from one trailhead to the other.

(Driving is a bit further since one will have to loop around either over Sentinel Bridge or El Capitan Bridge (depending from which trailhead one's coming from and heading to)).
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 04:10PM
I wouldn't take a group of non-hikers on either trail. I'd take them to Sentinel Dome from GP parking lot, then around the loop to Taft Point, then back - and then down to Glacier Point for ice cream bars.

I might take a group of non-hikers on a hike around the valley floor - easy to shove whiners on a shuttle when they've had too much. That's about 7 miles with a bunch of side trips like Bridalveil and Lower Yosemite falls, the museum, the graveyard, Mirror Lake, plenty of things to see and do.

I might take a group of fit not-quite-hikers to Dewey Point from the McGurk trailhead - it's not got the extreme climb/drop or stairstep action of the Falls trail, just a nice walk out to the edge, and for more views, you can trek down the Pohono to a couple other points nearby.

Probably could load them up with fishing poles and take them on the 12 mile round trip to Ostrander for some brook trout fun.

Go to Mariposa grove and hike the whole upper and lower grove - there's some hill climbing, and big trees to see. Could probably end up with nine miles of hiking by the end of it.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 08:19PM
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Ulysses61
There's also a drinking fountain at Glacier Point.

There is a full blown snack bar up there. Even ice cream.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 12:24AM
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mrcondron
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Ulysses61
There's also a drinking fountain at Glacier Point.

There is a full blown snack bar up there. Even ice cream.

I've heard a rumor that they even sell beer.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:45AM
One other thing: if you start the Four Mile Trail before 9:00 am, you will be in the shade 90% of the way up. You will be in the sun on the Yosemite Falls trail, which is on the other side of the Valley Floor. As for starting at 10:00 am.. forget it. DO NOT start a hike on the Valley Floor so late. Get out by 8:00!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 11:47AM by Ulysses61.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 04:45PM
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Ulysses61
One other thing: if you start the Four Mile Trail before 9:00 am, you will be in the shade 90% of the way up. You will be in the sun on the Yosemite Falls trail, which is on the other side of the Valley Floor. As for starting at 10:00 am.. forget it. DO NOT start a hike on the Valley Floor so late. Get out by 8:00!

I did Upper Yosemite Fall Trail to the Yosemite Creek Bridge and back, and started sometime around 9:30 at the trailhead. I have my digital photos which serve as a timestamp. The photos say around 10:30, but I think it's probably because I rarely adjust for DST. It took me somewhat around the neighborhood of 6 hours, but I took my time and spent a while at the top with my sandwich from Degnan's Deli (where my breakfast was their biscuits and gravy special for $2).

This was in winter though. It was plenty sunny for most of the day, although the clouds started forming on the way down. I suppose I didn't really have to deal with oppressive heat, although slush and sand make for an interesting lack of grip. I fell down a few times on the way back. I nursed my aching joints at the Mountain Room with a pint of Sierra Nevada.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 12:06PM
Begin the hike at dawn and make them pack plenty of water, water, and more water! Also, get yourself a good horse whip.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 01:50PM
Agree with EZ. In June, did both the Falls and 4 mile (4 mile has better views and ice cream at the top--Falls has the falls at the top and if you go to the Point, you get closer to Half Dome). I generally hike alone (though often find company throughout the hikes). Was out the door by 5:15 each morning as I walked from Curry to the trailheads. No issue with the sun/heat on either going up. Greatest advantage in going early is you have the trails to yourself (and cooler)--other than an accountant from SF and two bears, 4 mile was quiet at dawn. Falls was similar (though no bears on the trail). Coming down on the Falls, you will get hit hard by the sun (top third, but I assume nothng like Snow Creek)

The one thing with the Falls is that a little past Columbia Rock viewpoint, the trail heads down--perhaps 2-300 feet and then back up. I simply hate trails that make me do extra work. This was the third day of my trip and after doing 4 mile, Panorama , Mist one day, and Half Dome the second day, my legs were not in the mood to be played with.

Also, I wonder if the Falls will be much fun in late August--part of the fun is being hit by the mist and watching water tumble from the top.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:01PM
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Jalan
I simply hate trails that make me do extra work.

Then you'd really "love" Buck Creek on the High Sierra Trail.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:19PM
My wife use to say that for me it was the destination, not the journey. I have gotten better--much better. At every turn on 4 mile, the journey truly was the destination--view gets better and better as you go up,
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:35PM
eeek--BTW, this is what happens when you take a city kid from the midwest to the mountains. I'm soft. A day tripper (all day) but give me an adult beverage when I get back.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:39PM
I grew up in the midwest. Its OK...I just pack an adult beverage in my bear can.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:46PM
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 02:05PM
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I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.

Wow, to each his own... I've never heard of any other hiker ever saying that the Four Mile Trail is "boring." Yes, you can reach Glacier Point by car, but I'm not getting the corrolation? I can also reach Mt. Washington in NH by car, Pikes Peak in CO by car and countless other hiking destinations by car. The point is to hike it.

Anyway, for the OP: believe me that the Four Mile Trail is a superlative trail with wonderful intermediate views, it's shaded and an incomparable day hike. If you didn't have the Boy Scouts with you, I would recommend extending the hike to Sentinel Dome, which would would make an 11 mil day hike. I've also extended it to Nevada Falls, but that's a long day hike of 18 miles.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:11PM
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Ulysses61
Quote
I find the 4-miler boring. Much of it is because the final destination is one that can be reached by automobile.

Wow, to each his own... I've never heard of any other hiker ever saying that the Four Mile Trail is "boring." Yes, you can reach Glacier Point by car, but I'm not getting the corrolation? I can also reach Mt. Washington in NH by car, Pikes Peak in CO by car and countless other hiking destinations by car. The point is to hike it.

Anyway, for the OP: believe me that the Four Mile Trail is a superlative trail with wonderful intermediate views, it's shaded and an incomparable day hike. If you didn't have the Boy Scouts with you, I would recommend extending the hike to Sentinel Dome, which would would make an 11 mil day hike. I've also extended it to Nevada Falls, but that's a long day hike of 18 miles.

Yea, I didn't mean to be too harsh. It's a nicely paved, maintained trail. If only it led to a place that can't be reached by car, that's all.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 02:10PM
Any hiker doesn't need to see the tour buses at Glacier Point if they start early enough. It takes me 1:35 to get up the Four Mile Trail, I usually start at 6:00 am and have never seen a bus there when starting that early. In fact, hardly anyone is up at GP this early. The buses and vehicles start pouring in much later. There's virtually no one on the trail in the early morning hours.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 02:30PM
anyone have any photos of Yosemite Falls trail?
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 02:41PM
Quote
forrestranger
anyone have any photos of Yosemite Falls trail?

In early March of this year, from Oh My Gosh Point:

avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 03:06PM
Quote
forrestranger
anyone have any photos of Yosemite Falls trail?

You can see a lot of it in this one:

http://yosemitephotos.net/main.php/v/yosemite/four-mile-trail/nsh-dscn4548.jpg.html?g2_imageViewsIndex=3
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 11:25PM
Quote
forrestranger
anyone have any photos of Yosemite Falls trail?

Only a few, I'm nearly out of space.

UYF



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 11:26PM by Ohnivy-Drak.
avatar Single Sentence Summary
July 31, 2011 04:13PM
With "leaders" like that, who needs enemies?



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 04:17PM by szalkowski.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 04:17PM
Quote
szalkowski
With "leaders" like that, who needs enemies.

I hated hiking when I first was made to do it by such leaders. Too many of them seem to think every kid is in good shape and the only reason they are slow is not being yelled at enough.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 04:53PM
lolol isn't THAT the truth?!!!!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 05:15PM
forrestranger,

Are any of these leaders (aside from you) prepared to take responsibility for the one or two scouts that may not be in shape to go all the way up? What would they do if you were not present, leave the laggards on their own and unsupervised?
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 05:11PM
When can I sign you up for Chick-on Adventures?

(I think u know the destination)



Chick-on is looking at you!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/31/2011 05:13PM by chick-on.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 05:19PM
Quote
chick-on
When can I sign you up for Chick-on Adventures?

(I think u know the destination)

Oh, gee. Maybe I should talk to Bee before signing up for that.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:09PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
chick-on
When can I sign you up for Chick-on Adventures?

(I think u know the destination)

Oh, gee. Maybe I should talk to Bee before signing up for that.


DO NOT FALL FOR "THE SHORTCUT TO SMITH PEAK" unless you are wearing Kevlar leg protectors!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



The body betrays and the weather conspires, hopefully, not on the same day.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 12:26AM
Quote
Bee
Quote
eeek
Quote
chick-on
When can I sign you up for Chick-on Adventures?

(I think u know the destination)

Oh, gee. Maybe I should talk to Bee before signing up for that.


DO NOT FALL FOR "THE SHORTCUT TO SMITH PEAK" unless you are wearing Kevlar leg protectors!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I think he's trying to talk me into the infinite switchbacks to Table Lake.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 10:58AM
Quote
Bee
DO NOT FALL FOR "THE SHORTCUT TO SMITH PEAK" unless you are wearing Kevlar leg protectors!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You were suppose to hike like this: Dancing GIrl



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
July 31, 2011 10:18PM
Quote
eeek
I hated hiking when I first was made to do it by such leaders. Too many of them seem to think every kid is in good shape and the only reason they are slow is not being yelled at enough.

THIS says it all! Creating a death march in the hot sun will only provide years of traumatic memories and resentment all around.

If the group leaders insist on this trail, than it is their responsibility to do it wisely -- which is starting at a decent time! (I have visions of the dehydrated carnage that I have witnessed on Grand Canyon's Bright Angel Trail)



The body betrays and the weather conspires, hopefully, not on the same day.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 12:28AM
Quote
Bee
If the group leaders insist on this trail, than it is their responsibility to do it wisely

My memories of my scouting years do not include the slightest bit of wisdom permeating the leaders. And don't get me started on the official equipment (i.e. crap) that the organization sold to kids that didn't know better.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 12:32AM
Agreed RE: starting a hike at the proper time.
As mentioned, I started this hike @ 11:30AM and consumed all 3 liters of water by the time I reached the top. At the 85% mark, I intentionally drank less to make it last long as possible. Bringing along an h20 filter was a smart idea.
Also would have been smart to start at 5:30am or some time when the sun wasn't raping me.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 09:26AM
We hiked it as a family 2 weeks ago and had a "relatively" great time - My youngest (nine year old daughter) made it to the top no problem at all - The only problems were that I am almost 50 and out of shape (which is a universal problem, not just for hiking) and that my wife hurt her knee coming down the trail so we had to take it really slow (she was the one exception to all of us having a great time - but she was determined to get to the top) - We started very late (noon) which I was upset about but living with all girls; it has become a fact of life never to be on time for anything - teenage daughters have to look nice in case they need to be rescued by handsome search and rescue guys - We were at the top before 5 and made it back to the trailhead just as it got dark - Your problem will be holding the 16-17 year olds back - That's alot of energy there - Some of those guys will be able to run up the trail in a couple of hours -

My "not so secret" weapon to making these hikes is to drink alot of water the night before and bring water with you - That tends to make the difference in an enjoyable hike and one that you work too hard at - I'm not sure I would give this a 5 either for difficulty - Maybe a 4
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 01:15PM
Quote
SoCalCPA
My "not so secret" weapon to making these hikes is to drink alot of water the night before

That's for additional exercise from running to the bathroom all night?
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 01:45PM
I enjoyed this hike last week as well as four mile. Have done both before and will again. I enjoued UYF much more though. Left at 10:00 (not the plan) and completed in 5 1/2 hours. freaked me out that people were cooling off in the water between bridge and the upper fall. I didn't find it too diificult but I hike a lot. Brought 2 litres and drank 32 ounces before. Just enough for me.

I saw plenty of adults on the trail but not a lot of kids. They might have some issues with acclimation though. If they they are active hikers they should be fine. If they are not then I would suggest against the hike. Four mile is great going up but I found going down a little boring and repetitive (gasp) and very hard on the knees. Very shaded though. I find mist trail to Nevada more difficult due to the darn steps! My knees were not happy and I don't usually have problems with them. It is a heavy mist now and not a drenching.

Try to ensure that the kids have a say in the hike and know that if they need to stop or return that they have that option! Plus there ars still missing posters from the gentleman who went missing in this trail!! They might question doing the hike or even mist when they are facing all those posters!!
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 02:37PM
Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

By the way, I do not recommend doing what we did and waiting to noon to start - not a smart thing - But, I was pointing out that even going at a slower pace and coming back down the steep trail injured, we were still able to finish the trail up and down before dark. It's a very doable trail even with the more difficult second set of switchbacks after "Oh My Gosh" that people have been commenting on
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 03:05PM
Quote
SoCalCPA

Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

If you're going to superhydrate yourself the night before by drinking a lot of water, the key to not having to make multiple runs to the bathroom during the night is not to eat (or drink) anything sweet. If you drink a lot of fluid and also consume sweets (either in solid or liquid form), you are much more likely to release the water during the night (which kinda defeats the point of hydrating yourself the night before).

OTOH, eating a few salty nuts with the water the night before will help your body retain the water.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 04:17PM
Quote
plawrence
Quote
SoCalCPA

Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

If you're going to superhydrate yourself the night before by drinking a lot of water, the key to not having to make multiple runs to the bathroom during the night is not to eat (or drink) anything sweet. If you drink a lot of fluid and also consume sweets (either in solid or liquid form), you are much more likely to release the water during the night (which kinda defeats the point of hydrating yourself the night before).

OTOH, eating a few salty nuts with the water the night before will help your body retain the water.

Do you understand glucose metabolism, serum osmolality, anti-diuretic hormone, glomerular filtration, water homeostasis, congestive heart failure, natriuretic peptide, the autonomic nervous system and body fluid volumes well enough to be making these sort of broad recommendations?



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 04:32PM
Quote
Frank Furter
Quote
plawrence
Quote
SoCalCPA

Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

If you're going to superhydrate yourself the night before by drinking a lot of water, the key to not having to make multiple runs to the bathroom during the night is not to eat (or drink) anything sweet. If you drink a lot of fluid and also consume sweets (either in solid or liquid form), you are much more likely to release the water during the night (which kinda defeats the point of hydrating yourself the night before).

OTOH, eating a few salty nuts with the water the night before will help your body retain the water.

Do you understand glucose metabolism, serum osmolality, anti-diuretic hormone, glomerular filtration, water homeostasis, congestive heart failure, natriuretic peptide, the autonomic nervous system and body fluid volumes well enough to be making these sort of broad recommendations?


I guess I do since I made the suggestions... wink
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 05:21PM
Quote
plawrence
Quote
Frank Furter
Quote
plawrence
Quote
SoCalCPA

Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

If you're going to superhydrate yourself the night before by drinking a lot of water, the key to not having to make multiple runs to the bathroom during the night is not to eat (or drink) anything sweet. If you drink a lot of fluid and also consume sweets (either in solid or liquid form), you are much more likely to release the water during the night (which kinda defeats the point of hydrating yourself the night before).

OTOH, eating a few salty nuts with the water the night before will help your body retain the water.

Do you understand glucose metabolism, serum osmolality, anti-diuretic hormone, glomerular filtration, water homeostasis, congestive heart failure, natriuretic peptide, the autonomic nervous system and body fluid volumes well enough to be making these sort of broad recommendations?


I guess I do since I made the suggestions... wink

Then maybe you would like to explain the physiology a little more because normal glucose metabolism (without hyperglycemia) does not obligate increased urine production. The metabolism of glucose, in fact, produces a small amount of water and those with renal failure are on high carbohydrate/low protein diets.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 01:19PM
Quote
Frank Furter
Quote
plawrence
Quote
SoCalCPA

Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

If you're going to superhydrate yourself the night before by drinking a lot of water, the key to not having to make multiple runs to the bathroom during the night is not to eat (or drink) anything sweet. If you drink a lot of fluid and also consume sweets (either in solid or liquid form), you are much more likely to release the water during the night (which kinda defeats the point of hydrating yourself the night before).

OTOH, eating a few salty nuts with the water the night before will help your body retain the water.

Do you understand glucose metabolism, serum osmolality, anti-diuretic hormone, glomerular filtration, water homeostasis, congestive heart failure, natriuretic peptide, the autonomic nervous system and body fluid volumes well enough to be making these sort of broad recommendations?

"Be making"?
How about simply saying "make"?

Incorrect: "You shouldn't be doing that."
Correct: "You shouldn't do that."
It isn't necessary to add "be" & "ing".

I agree on the salty nuts/retaining water sentiment. Experience demonstrates this. No need to use fancy words and claims, just to make oneself feel more intelligent.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 01, 2011 10:53AM
I don't have a lot of new information to add, but I'll give you my observations. My wife and I made our first trip to Yosemite in June, so it all was new to us. We did this hike two days after hiking the Half Dome trail (to about half way up sub dome, but that's a topic for a different thread..), and didn't have too much trouble. We're 51 and 45, and in decent shape. But we live in Wisconsin, so we don't get to hike in elevation very often. It was our last day in the park, so we were pretty acclimated by then.

We started the hike at about 7:00 am, which was good. The climb up is pretty grinding, although I didn't think the section to Columbia Rock was too bad. The third section up the sunny switchbacks is challenging, but if you stop every now and then you'll be fine. But I would think starting at 10 would make the hike up significantly more difficult.

I'll echo the comments about water, too. We each had 3 liters and ref-filled at the top. (In June, there was a decent stream to filter water not too far from the trail split to the upper fall lookout. Don't try to filter out of the main creek!)

I thought the top was really enjoyable. We didn't find the access to the lookout to be too scary. My wife has an issue with heights (see the "halfway up sub dome" comment above), but did fine on the little stairway. There's a handrailing on the rock side, so you at least have some sense of security. The lookout itself is a pretty good size, and didn't seem too scary, but it's not right up to the edge. Interestingly, I found two cigarette butts at the lookout--no better way to celebrate a tough climb in the mountains than with a couple of smokes!!

We also went up to Yosemite Point, which you should definitely do. It's really worth it to go up there and check out the views. It was our only north rim hike, so it was great to see the valley from that perspective.

The hike down is pretty tough, but I've always found downhill to be more difficult than uphill on steep trails. Gravity isn't necessarily your friend. We stopped at Oh-My-Gosh Point on the way down, which was excellent! It was a nice break and a fantastic view. It's pretty dicey out there, though, so I'm not sure a group of teenagers is the best idea. There's not a lot of room, and the railing is pretty minimalist.

All in all, I highly recommend the hike. I will say that the half dome day was a lot harder, but having to bail on sub dome might have been part of it. I thought the smoking hot desert near Little Yosemite Valley was way worse than the switchbacks at the top of Upper Yoseemite Fall trail, at least as far as the heat and sun were concerned. And I frankly didn't care for the JMT past Nevada Fall at all. You're not dodging mule piles all the way down the Upper Yose trail!!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 04:39PM
Quote
herosemblem
Quote
Frank Furter
Quote
plawrence
Quote
SoCalCPA

Good one Eeek - I deserve it - but seriously, whenever I superhydrate the night before, it makes a big difference for me when doing something strenuous the next day - Maybe it's on "old wives" tale kind of rememdy but it sure seems to work for me.

If you're going to superhydrate yourself the night before by drinking a lot of water, the key to not having to make multiple runs to the bathroom during the night is not to eat (or drink) anything sweet. If you drink a lot of fluid and also consume sweets (either in solid or liquid form), you are much more likely to release the water during the night (which kinda defeats the point of hydrating yourself the night before).

OTOH, eating a few salty nuts with the water the night before will help your body retain the water.

Do you understand glucose metabolism, serum osmolality, anti-diuretic hormone, glomerular filtration, water homeostasis, congestive heart failure, natriuretic peptide, the autonomic nervous system and body fluid volumes well enough to be making these sort of broad recommendations?

"Be making"?
How about simply saying "make"?

Incorrect: "You shouldn't be doing that."
Correct: "You shouldn't do that."
It isn't necessary to add "be" & "ing".

I agree on the salty nuts/retaining water sentiment. Experience demonstrates this. No need to use fancy words and claims, just to make oneself feel more intelligent.

If you are commenting about an infinitive and gerund combination, it is perfectly correct grammar. It may not be the finest diction and Strunk (Elements of Style) may object to the word choice and wordiness, but it is not technically incorrect to my knowledge.


The argument presented seems to be that eating peanuts will reduce the amount of water you need to drink the next day or in some beneficial way, to hold on to more water that can be used for sweat on the trail. Peanuts are a fine and wonderful food, however, they do not substitute for adequate water intake any more than sea water does. If a person drinks sea water, for example, that "volume" of salt water will have to be diluted to a physiologic concentration by water in that person's body--- the seawater will, in effect, steal fluid that could be used for sweat production.

Sweat and other insensible water losses (humidified exhaled air, for example) are primarily fluids with very low electrolytes concentration. To create sweat, water is moved from extracellular and intracellular fluid spaces into eccrine sweat glands. Eventually, as more and more water is lost by sweat, the electrolyte concentrations of sodium in the extracellular fluid rise (because more water than salt is lost). This rise in sodium (hypernatremia) stimulates the release of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) from the pituitary which acts on the kidneys to make the urine very concentrated (thus holding on to more water). As increasing water loss (dehydration) occurs, the reduction of the extracellular and intracellular spaces eventually causes a decrease in circulating blood volume (one explanation for an increase in heart rate with severe dehydration). With extreme dehydration and reduction in blood volume, additional compensatory body responses occur beyond tachycardia.

It is not really possible to load with salt to "expand" the extracellular space with salt + water to produce a situation beneficial to sweat production because it will essentially eventually result in too much salt in the body. Sweat production does not depend upon salt availability so much as upon water in the body. In excess and in chronic conditions, added sodium becomes a problem because it can expand abnormally the extracellular space which can result in abnormally swollen tissues, hypertension or high sodium concentration in the blood. However, in most normal healthy individuals expanding the extracellular fluids is a benign event to which the body can compensate. Sodium chloride primarily stays in the extracellular fluid space and since sweat does not contain much sodium chloride, not much sodium is lost when sweat is produced. If I remember correctly, there is even some reabsorption of salt by the skin which means that the net salt loss is low and easily met by dietary intake. The body does not really have a way to store "pure water" very well. Eventually, excess salt is removed by the kidney, obligating the production of urine to eliminate those electrolytes.

The normally functioning kidney filters into the nephrons (functional unit of the kidney) about 6 liters of fluid per hour. Obviously this does not all become the 30-100 ml of urine most people make per hour. Therefore, most of the kidney's job is to recapture the filtered fluid. When you drink pure water, it causes a drop in serum osmolality (which is mainly related to the sodium content) which then inhibits ADH production. Very quickly the kidneys stop re-absorbing fluid and produce a very dilute urine. So for most people, "tanking" up or "water loading" the day before will just result in more trips to the bathroom before reaching the trailhead because the body does not understand that it is suppose to store that fluid for future sweat production. There is no value to adding excess salt to someone on a typical American diet, because we already have more salt than we need. If you tank up with lots of salt and water, you will not urinate so much because your osmolality (a trigger for ADH) will not change as much, but the body will not have the "low salt fluid" that is desirable for sweat production and will eventually have a burden of salt to eliminate. The goal should be to match acutely your water intake to your water losses.

My personal approach is to drink 16-20 oz just before hitting the trail so that there is less to carry and less loss into urine and to drink frequent 4-8 oz volumes on the trail depending upon conditions. There are certain gastrointestinal and kidney diseases or hormonal problems (like Addisions Disease) that may benefit from sodium loading because there is a chronic loss of sodium, but there is no value to the normal person for the purpose of preparing for strenuous activity to add salt beyond what is in a normal diet (since the normal American diet has an excess of salt to begin with). For most people under typical conditions, the best hydration fluid is water alone without added salt in sufficient volume to result in production of about 500 ml urine/ day.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/03/2011 05:15PM by Frank Furter.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 04:57PM
... and we already ran out and bought each of those guys one of these (conveniently doubles as a mosquito bonker):
http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/4300/HRS222?utm_source=pricegrabber&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=pricegrabber%2Bdata%2Bfeed
(Disappointedly Yours)
The Marmots
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 05:06PM
Is it ok if I have Pistachios instead of Peanuts? - Peanuts give me gas!
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 05:09PM
Quote
SoCalCPA
Is it ok if I have Pistachios instead of Peanuts? - Peanuts give me gas!

Pistachios are one of our staples! In the shell! (yeah, it's a little more weight... but funner to eat)

(confession: didn't make it past the 2nd paragraph of Dawg's Urination Explanation)

(if I supersaturate myself I end up super-urinating)

Half a Nice Day



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 06:38PM
He had me at "tachycardia."
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 04, 2011 04:47AM
Quote
Jalan
He had me at "tachycardia."

I got a weird look from a triage nurse when I told her I had tachycardia. Then she took my pulse and told me I was correct.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 06:27PM
Quote
SoCalCPA
Is it ok if I have Pistachios instead of Peanuts? - Peanuts give me gas!

You don't want the extra thrust?
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 03, 2011 08:45PM
Quote
forrestranger

........but i'm concerned that the Yosemite Falls hike is too much for those not accustomed to hiking (especially in the direct sun if thats the case).

i've been told that these hikes are rated 1-5 (5 being the hardest), and that Yosemite Falls trail is a 5.

i'm not the leader nor the person in charge of this hike, but i have voiced my concerns to those who are in charge, suggesting a different hike etc, but they insist on this hike, even knowing some of the boys won't make it.

why you ask? they want to teach them a life lesson on how difficult things can be when they are unprepared etc ( i can think of other ways to do this lol).

i'm not looking forward to taking some kid back down the trail, and having to wait for others to complete the hike (if they do), and sit there for 8 hours!!

I have done the trail years ago with a knee that is held together by staples and pins but only up to Columbia Rock because I was smart enough to know that this was as far as I was going to be able to go and still make it down without having to call the ranger to come and get me.

Every cell in my body is screaming "Dont do it" if you have that many concerns. It sounds you are the only leader that is not an idiot. This is the perfect scenario for a SAR where some people will have difficulty with the hike because of the shape they are in or they have not enough hiking experience but are forced to go on because of peer or leader pressure. Think about how many kids have gotten hurt or even died because of over zealous leaders. This is not the way to teach a life lesson on preparation.

If I was in your position, I would demand that the parents of the kids be told of the risks of taking a long hike with hikers with limited hiking experience before you go to Yosemite and let them know that you are concerned about taking this hike. This way you might be able to avoid a disastrous outcome. These kids are not in an army boot camp and can be taken on a less challenging hike which they will enjoy and will be able to finish. This way they will learn something and also have pride in the fact that they completed a hike and will have fun doing it. The other posters suggested some very nice and not boring hikes that can be enjoyed by everyone in your group.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 07, 2011 06:43PM
Still incredulous that anyone who loves Yosemite would deem the Four Mile Trail "boring." Are you sure that's just not a euphenism for, "it's too hard, I'm out of shape and I can't hack it?"

The views of Yosemite Falls and everything on the Valley Floor are incomparable. Each switchback higher gives you a different perspective. The trail is shaded, well graded, incomparably lovely and an infinitely more beautiful hike than the overrated, over-crowded Half Dome, littered with unprepared people who litter, scream loudly and have no comprehension about hiker etiquette.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 07, 2011 08:43PM
I have to agree. Of all the Valley to Rim trails in Yosemite, the Four Mile is the least boring to me. Definitely, the most views per mile. Also how the sunlight plays with the cliffs, makes the views of an early morning hike noticeably different than a late afternoon hike on the Four Mile Trail.

But to be honest, for views of Yosemite Valley, my favorite trail is the Valley loop trail west of Sentinel Bridge and Yosemite Village.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 07, 2011 10:11PM
Quote
Ulysses61
Still incredulous that anyone who loves Yosemite would deem the Four Mile Trail "boring." Are you sure that's just not a euphenism for, "it's too hard, I'm out of shape and I can't hack it?"

The views of Yosemite Falls and everything on the Valley Floor are incomparable. Each switchback higher gives you a different perspective. The trail is shaded, well graded, incomparably lovely and an infinitely more beautiful hike than the overrated, over-crowded Half Dome, littered with unprepared people who litter, scream loudly and have no comprehension about hiker etiquette.

While shaded is certainly nice, I have few problems with the sun. Heat rarely bothers me. I've always found it amusing that majority of others have complaints about the sun. No problems getting up UYF in no more than 2.5 hours. Icy cold winter weather? I'm quite impressed with those that can deal with those conditions.

Half Dome trail is overrated, agreed. And I really don't have much inclination to reach the top. While I'll admit the cables aren't really for me, there's also the "Half Dome is missing from the view because I'm standing on it" factor, lol.

Boring wasn't the correct choice of words, I've taken it back once already. It's more of a motivation thing. I'd just rather spend the time and energy to go to a place that can't be driven to. The views from GP are tremendous, but it's an annoying tourist magnet. But that's just me, to each his/her own.

btw, I've also labeled Sentinel Dome as "cheating" because the views are too good for such a relaxing hike. Maybe I'm just a weirdo. smiling smiley
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 08, 2011 12:27AM
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak

While shaded is certainly nice, I have few problems with the sun. Heat rarely bothers me. I've always found it amusing that majority of others have complaints about the sun. No problems getting up UYF in no more than 2.5 hours. Icy cold winter weather? I'm quite impressed with those that can deal with those conditions.

Amusing? Some of us have some real issues with sun. Nothing saps the energy out of me more than hiking on open granite in the sun.

Hope you don't end up laughing in front of me on the trail - I get cranky when I've had too much sun and the headache's comin' on. Poke fun at my skin cancer scars and I'll show you amusing. And you don't get to laugh at my inability to read without glasses, the cataracts I had fixed in my early 30s were from too much sun!

Hope you are taking it seriously enough long enough to put on some good UV blocking glasses! Don't do what I did.
avatar Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 08, 2011 12:39AM
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak

While shaded is certainly nice, I have few problems with the sun. Heat rarely bothers me. I've always found it amusing that majority of others have complaints about the sun. No problems getting up UYF in no more than 2.5 hours. Icy cold winter weather? I'm quite impressed with those that can deal with those conditions.

Heh, I'm just your polar opposite. While I don't like hiking uphill in the heat (hot desert trails with little elevation gain are no problem), I love cold weather. I'm quite comfortable in short sleeve t-shirts down to the 40's. A light jacket is all I need in the 30's. Hiking when the temps are down into the teen's, no problem whatsoever.
Re: Yosemite Falls hiking trail
August 08, 2011 08:13AM
Quote
Ohnivy-Drak


While shaded is certainly nice, I have few problems with the sun. Heat rarely bothers me. I've always found it amusing that majority of others have complaints about the sun. No problems getting up UYF in no more than 2.5 hours. Icy cold winter weather? I'm quite impressed with those that can deal with those conditions.

I am right with Almostthere and Plawrence with having heat and sun issues. My son, husband and I had heat exhaustion ( and not at the same time) on trips to the southwest two different summers even though we took all the precautions. We have always been heat and sun wimps and now we are extra sensitive to heat and sun. My doctor said that each time you get heat exhaustion you become more sensitive to heat. Plus my husband has had precancerous spots removed and I have Lupus and exposure to too much sun makes me get a rash and feel like I have the flu. My son is so pale that he looks like a ghost so no matter how much sunscreen he puts on, he burns. But give us some cool weather and clouds and we will be out all day. Our favorite time to go to Zion is for Thanksgiving when it is cooler. Like Plawrence, I wear shorts when it is below 50 with no problem at all.


Almostthere, try Moeben UV sleeves. I get too hot in regular UV clothes because of the material they are made of. With the sleeves, I can wear a regular t-shirt and still have protection for my arms and once I am out of the sun, I just take them off. They are also good for those times when you are driving and the sun hits your left arm.
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