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Re: Yosemite valley in December

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Yosemite valley in December
December 16, 2012 05:36PM
Just returned from a weekend visit to Yosemite. My wife and I headed up there to try to figure out how to cross-country ski before our trip to the Glacier Point Ski Hut in February...at least we know what we're getting ourselves into now. We also stopped in the valley so I could take some pictures.











Usually coyotes are pretty timid, so I was surprised when this guy approached our car. He came within 15-20 ft...hopefully it's just curiosity and not that he's been fed by humans in the past.
avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 16, 2012 07:10PM
My guess is he's begging.

i.e. he's been feed in the past has learned that that behavior might lead to a snack sad smiley

Most interactions I've seen between a coyote and a car have been like you've describe, they're very attentive of the car/driver. When I've been on foot they've pretty much ignored me.
avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 16, 2012 11:43PM
About four or five years ago there was a coyote hanging around Southside Drive near the El Cap/Bridalveil Fall pullouts what would approach the cars with a noticeable limp. After being given food by the tourist, the coyote would run off into the woods with no limp at all!

There's a reason why coyotes have earned a reputation of being smart creatures...

.
Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 18, 2012 12:36AM
Quote
plawrence
About four or five years ago there was a coyote hanging around Southside Drive near the El Cap/Bridalveil Fall pullouts what would approach the cars with a noticeable limp. After being given food by the tourist, the coyote would run off into the woods with no limp at all!

There's a reason why coyotes have earned a reputation of being smart creatures...
.

This is cool to think about but in reality do you really think the coyote figured out that limping brought sympathy? I think it is more likely that just like a human, it is possible to have a limp walking, but be able to run without a limp.
Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 16, 2012 09:50PM
Cool pics. Thanks for posting.
Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 17, 2012 02:03PM
The Yosemite coyotes always look fatter than the ones around here who have to hunt for puppies and kittens.

The Yosemite coyotes are smart. There were two along the road one time. One stood in the middle of the road to stop a line of cars. The other one then approached all the car windows begging.
avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 17, 2012 03:01PM
Quote
redpakotasea
Usually coyotes are pretty timid, so I was surprised when this guy approached our car. He came within 15-20 ft...hopefully it's just curiosity and not that he's been fed by humans in the past.

It's because he gets food from tourists. <sigh>
avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 18, 2012 06:28PM
Yea definitely used to being fed...this shot has no zoom. just off the side of the 41, right after the tunnel view on the way out.

avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 19, 2012 09:22AM
On Glacier Point Road:

avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 20, 2012 04:25AM
i feel sad to say this but i don't think people will ever stop feeding the animals in yosemite, no matter how many warning signs are posted =( sometimes i wonder to myself if they ever consider the possible consequences
Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 20, 2012 08:48AM
Unfortunately, I have to agree with you. Yosemite is not the only park we have seen people feeding the animals. Once when we were in the Rocky Mountains, there was a family feeding some squirrels near me and I nicely said to the father that it is against the park rules and it is harmful to the animals to feed them and also his children could be bitten. The man started screaming at me that he can do whatever he wants to do and approached me in a aggressive manner so I walked away. Nearby there were some NPS volunteers and I told them what happened and they started walking towards the man and when he saw them coming, he and his family jumped into the car and drove away. That was the only time that I have had that kind of reaction. Usually when I have asked people not to feed that animals and explain why, they stop or a few just ignore me. I started carrying Leave No Trace educational cards with me and hand them out to people who are interested.

But even though the parks have things in their guides, brochures and signs, some people will always believe that they are above the rules.
avatar Re: Yosemite valley in December
December 20, 2012 12:46PM
I think most people who feed the animals simply do it out of total ignorance. Even when you tell them it harms the animals, they don't understand why, and maybe it could'nt hurt just this one time. Even for those who receive a thorough explaination, they probably don't completely buy it because it's somebody else's arguement that is presenting them an inconveniance. Then there are those who have already been described, the ones who do damned well what they please and don't give a hoot about rules. The agressive ones are over the top! We are from a society taught to feed squirrels and pidgeons in city parks so why can't we do it in a national park? I'm not sure what the solution is to this problem because we can not justify signs or enforcement divisions for every stupid thing people do in wilderness locations, whether it's feeding rodents or wading to a rock in the stream above Vernal Fall to have one's picture taken.
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