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Re: camera Do you still take a dedicated camera (P&S, SLR, etc.) when visiting Yosemite?

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avatar camera Do you still take a dedicated camera (P&S, SLR, etc.) when visiting Yosemite?
March 24, 2017 08:55PM
Poll
48 votes were received.
All visitors can vote.
Do you still bring along a dedicated camera on hikes in Yosemite?




The image quality of the built-in cameras of smartphones have improved so much in recent years, is it necessary or worthwhile to bring along a separate dedicated camera to snap high quality photos while visiting national parks like Yosemite?

Is it worth the extra weight and bulk when hiking (or backpacking) deep in the backcountry, especially when it evolves a lot of elevation gain, as it usually does when hiking Yosemite?



Leave No Trace
If I learned how to use a DSLR, I'd take one.
avatar Re: camera Do you still take a dedicated camera (P&S, SLR, etc.) when visiting Yosemite?
March 27, 2017 09:57PM
Depends on the mood or purpose of the trip.

If it's a photography dedicated trip I take everything, DSLR, lenses, Gigapan mount, tripod, batteries, memory cards, chargers etc. I have a camera backpack I can re-pack to what I need that day.

If it's a casual trip I have at least the cell phone, but most likely also a P&S.
I have an old cheap cell phone that's not even close to as good as the new high end phones, but is fine for casual snap shots.
But sometimes I need the zoom lens my P&S has. Try that with a cell phone!
I am using the DSLR less and less, going more to a compact, yet high end, point and shoot. Especially for backpacking.
avatar Re: camera Do you still take a dedicated camera (P&S, SLR, etc.) when visiting Yosemite?
April 27, 2017 03:07PM
Obviously, context is everything. My fitness limits me to easy, casual hikes. Usually not more than 4-5 miles. As such, my trips focus on trying to capture different and/or seasonal type photos which usually involves minimal hiking. While I never pass up the icons, I'm really always looking for something unique that most people would not associate with Yosemite. Same goes for photos of the icons. Lesser viewed perspectives are always the goal. As such I do drag all my DSLR gear with me but many times it is only a short walk to the car for a different lens.However, I have taken it all with me when embarking on some of the hikes I've done.









Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2017 03:08PM by JohnC.
Using my DSLR as long as it's not a long trip where weight is critical. If I'm climbing I use my iPhone 6 or small Panasonic point and shoot. For anything more than an overnight trip my DSLR is left at home though.
Stunning photos. Can't do that with a point-and-shoot.
avatar Re: camera Do you still take a dedicated camera (P&S, SLR, etc.) when visiting Yosemite?
April 28, 2017 10:19AM
Quote
Not quite The Geezer, but getting there
Stunning photos. Can't do that with a point-and-shoot.

Thank you.

PT01579-01618-3x2v.jpg 10700x9000 pixels 6 frame 3 column 2 row 40 image focus stack stitch blend A6000 30mm
enlarged vertical slice view at 50% pixels:
http://www.davidsenesac.com/2016_Trip_Chronicles/PT01579-01618-3x2vsl.jpg

To display the above full image would take over 8 side by side 4k UHD computer screens in a 2 column 4 row matrix. Ordinary people have simply not seen how impressive such images appear.


p >>>"The image quality of the built-in cameras of smartphones have improved so much in recent years, is it necessary or worthwhile to bring along a separate dedicated camera to snap high quality photos while visiting national parks like Yosemite? Is it worth the extra weight and bulk when hiking (or backpacking) deep in the backcountry, especially when it evolves a lot of elevation gain, as it usually does when hiking Yosemite?"

The question of what is high quality depends on the expected purpose. If one will only be posting images on the Internet and its social media sites or a web gallery, or making traditional 8x10 or 16x20 sized prints, then yes smartphones or compact digital cameras are fine for the required level of detail necessary. And then there are smaller numbers of more serious photography enthusiasts who make large prints or like this person are building up a body of highly detailed images for the next generation of digital display devices like 8k UHD and more. Thus for them equipment capable of more resolution and landscape detail is necessary.

Since digital cameras were developed less than 20 years ago along with the early Internet, far more people have been using cameras and using them more often than anytime during the film era. It is so easy, convenient, and inexpensive now. And with the rise of smartphones and much higher bandwidth Internet, once again a new era in photography has again risen.

When one looks at the full spectrum of people that take scenic, nature, and landscape photographs out in our natural areas, only a minor percentage have ever stepped foot in a high end urban photography gallery where large format images might be displayed. Well, in Yosemite we have one at the physically small Ansel Adams Gallery and similar galleries are often found in our other popular scenic national parks. And fair numbers of people do visit them. What they have seen is large format advertising prints in say malls or modest sized printed images at street art fairs. But not many have ever seen highly detailed large format work though people that actually live in our largest urban areas are more likely to have done so.

And that reflects on the point I will make that the average users of hand held of whatever type cameras are not familiar with how impressive highly detailed large images can be simply because they've seen few or none. What one will find is that many old time large format view camera users, and good numbers of today's high end DSLR users decided at some point to go to higher camera systems after having viewed such images because they were so impressive.

Another reason why not many people are familiar with large images is because traditionally just printing and framing a large image for public display has been very expensive. A decade ago my 4x5 prints required an $80 drum scan of the film, then $100 for professional level printing. Even more expensive is matting and framing that can easily cost several hundred dollars for just a modest level. Yet many older large format photographers had dozens, sometimes hundreds of strong images with very few ever reaching the walls of galleries and museums. But we are again at the knee of yet another revolution in photography, large format displays, one I am set to ride the first wave in on. And I will predict that increasing numbers of the next generation of our backcountry enthusiasts will switch to higher end gear of the day once their images can be so displayed at reasonable cost.

David
http://www.davidsenesac.com/2017_Trip_Chronicles/2017_Trip-Chronicles-0.html




http://www.davidsenesac.com



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 05/23/2017 08:40PM by DavidSenesac.
Re: camera Do you still take a dedicated camera (P&S, SLR, etc.) when visiting Yosemite?
February 25, 2018 06:33AM
I started with a SLR, moved to a compact digital, and then upgraded to a Canon DSLR. The last two years I questioned bringing the DSLR but a have brought it each time. My biggest problem with the DLSR is I keep it over my neck for quick use but can't seem to find a case or strapping system to keep it accessible but not bouncing. It also serves a backup if my phone were to fail. I think eventually I will go back to the point and shoot. The technology from the phones should improve the quality of the compacts and I really only use a couple of features from the DSLR.
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