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Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied

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avatar Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 06:44AM
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyle/the-other-side/band-aid-study-confirms-need-to-just-rip-it-off/story-e6frfhk6-1225809872775
http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/191_11_071209/fur11201_fm.html


Band-Aid study confirms need to just rip it off

PULLING a Band-Aid off slowly is more painful than doing so quickly, Australian research has confirmed.

Medium-sized Band-Aid were applied to 65 medical students at Cairns' James Cook University.......



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 09:33AM
But what if you prefer the s-l-o-w p-a-i-n-f-u-l process? I'm sure most backpackers do.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 11:21AM
As opposed to rubbing salt in the wound, or administering local anesthesia by punching the bandaidee in the bandaided area prior to removal?

I am just sure glad that I am not a hairy (or feathery) guy cuz then life would- ouch! - suck.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 11:25AM
Did we pay for this study?

Nevermnd. I guess the Aussie's paid for this one.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/14/2009 11:27AM by tomdisco.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 12:57PM
Quote
mrcondron
But what if you prefer the s-l-o-w p-a-i-n-f-u-l process? I'm sure most backpackers do.

I once removed a bandage from my knee quite slowly. And each step of the way I used a knife to cut the little hairs that were sticking to it. No pain at all.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/14/2009 06:52PM by eeek.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 05:47PM
Now you have a knew nee.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 05:49PM
I would not want to pull a bandaid off rapidly if it's covering a blister. Anybody else?
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 07:55PM
This last summer when I had the blisters from hell (new boots). I tried that hi-tech Blister Care (like the product Second Skin) and it was awesome, because you basically place the opaque patch over the blister (it has a gel-like consistency) and THEN put the band-aid on. When you need to change the band-aid, you don't need to remove the gal patch, so the blister remains undisturbed (a couple of times over a week, the gel patch came off with the band-aid, but it did not harm the healing blister at all. In one week's healing, I went from a bloody heel to being able to participate in a four-day back packing trip (with my OLD boots).
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 14, 2009 08:19PM
Quote
Bee
This last summer when I had the blisters from hell (new boots). I tried that hi-tech Blister Care (like the product Second Skin) and it was awesome, because you basically place the opaque patch over the blister (it has a gel-like consistency) and THEN put the band-aid on. When you need to change the band-aid, you don't need to remove the gal patch, so the blister remains undisturbed (a couple of times over a week, the gel patch came off with the band-aid, but it did not harm the healing blister at all. In one week's healing, I went from a bloody heel to being able to participate in a four-day back packing trip (with my OLD boots).

I had a woman with brand new boots on a five day backpack. Second Skin was the only reason she was able to continue the hike after the first day.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 15, 2009 07:39PM
I recently picked up the book, "Fixing Your Feet". The book is geared more to runners than hikers or backpackers but the basics are the same. The only modifications I've tried is use of Kenisio tape, nylon foot liners, plus Gorilla tape (better than duck tape) on the inside of my shoes around the heels. So far there have been no blisters or hot spots but local hiking is not the same test as the "high Sierra" for my new boots. No decision has been made regarding what products to use if I do get heel blisters on the trail although I have considered Second Skin.

Bee, did you find the bandaids sufficient to hold the second skin in place? Also, did you use anything else over the bandaids in the way of tape?

This is a tough subject for experimentation because nobody want to gets blisters just to try out a variety of remedies.

Jim
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 15, 2009 07:42PM
Consider benzoin spray (smells like bananas) prior to applying tape. Makes tape stick better in moist areas. In people with dry and thin skin, benzoin + tape can actually pull skin off (not blisters) when removed.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 15, 2009 07:53PM
Quote
Frank Furter
Consider benzoin spray (smells like bananas) prior to applying tape. Makes tape stick better in moist areas. In people with dry and thin skin, benzoin + tape can actually pull skin off (not blisters) when removed.

Frank, I have what might be described as thin skin on my feet.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 15, 2009 08:04PM
Two words: Darn Tough Socks



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 16, 2009 09:16PM
Quote
Frank Furter
Two words: Darn Tough Socks

New math?

But, for the umpteenth time, these SOCKS Rule!
Thanks Dog
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 15, 2009 07:55PM
Jim, I used one of those large canvas "super-stick" squares with the pad in the middle (so that the pad would rest over the gel patch) The fabric patch was MUCH superior to the so-called "waterproof" latex jobber (that was a POS) I continued to use this combo all week AND during the four-day backpack trip that followed -- I never leave home without this combo, even for a day hike! I found that if you start piling up too many layers (tape on top of patches, etc) it starts to change the way the boot fits AND it generates/traps even MORE moisture (Moleskine is only good for sticking to the sides of a waste can) I cannot say enough good things about Second Skin (I carry it in different sizes as part of my first aid kit).

B
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 16, 2009 01:31PM
Bee,

I agree with your opinion regarding moleskin.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 16, 2009 09:01PM
The worst of the WORST Moleskin: The New (and unimproved) Ultra Moleskin was even WORSE -- it was thick and cushy, which meant that it bunched up and slipped off even faster..!!
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 16, 2009 09:48PM
Quote
Bee
The worst of the WORST Moleskin: The New (and unimproved) Ultra Moleskin was even WORSE -- it was thick and cushy, which meant that it bunched up and slipped off even faster..!!

I never liked that stuff.
avatar Re: Optimal Band-Aid Removal Technique Studied
December 18, 2009 08:12AM
The first time I used Kenisio tape recently really surprised me. It did not seem to be all that sticky so I was not sure how good it was going to adhere. Large 2" x 3.5" segments around each heel stayed exactly where I placed them and there was no fraying or curling at the edges. Interestingly, there was a 3mm white spot on the left foot tape that clearly indicated a potential hot spot if it were not for the tape.
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