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Re: Astronomy Festival at Bryce Canyon July 7-10

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avatar Astronomy Festival at Bryce Canyon July 7-10
July 02, 2010 06:15PM
Stargazers, take note: Get an eyeful of deep space at a beautiful place on earth during the 10th annual Bryce Canyon Astronomy Festival July 7-10 at Bryce Canyon National Park.

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avatar Re: Astronomy Festival at Bryce Canyon July 7-10
July 04, 2010 08:02AM
I found it odd that the evening telescope viewing shuts down at 12:30 AM when the best seeing conditions begin to prevail. Don't they realize we amateur astronomers are sleep deprived photon junkies that stay up more than half the night?
avatar Re: Astronomy Festival at Bryce Canyon July 7-10
July 04, 2010 08:29AM
Quote
tomdisco
I found it odd that the evening telescope viewing shuts down at 12:30 AM when the best seeing conditions begin to prevail. Don't they realize we amateur astronomers are sleep deprived photon junkies that stay up more than half the night?

I saw one of their setups during the daytime a few years back. They had telescopes that were pointed at the sun, but with filters.
avatar Re: Astronomy Festival at Bryce Canyon July 7-10
July 04, 2010 11:28AM
Quote
y_p_w
Quote
tomdisco
I found it odd that the evening telescope viewing shuts down at 12:30 AM when the best seeing conditions begin to prevail. Don't they realize we amateur astronomers are sleep deprived photon junkies that stay up more than half the night?

I saw one of their setups during the daytime a few years back. They had telescopes that were pointed at the sun, but with filters.

Yep, we do that too although right now there is only one lonely sunspot to observe. Most medium to large amateur scopes use relatively inexpensive "white light filters" which reveal a white disk w/ black sunspots. Some folks have much smaller but expensive dedicated solar telescopes with hydrogen alpha filters that allow them to see granular structure on the Sun's surface and actual flares along the rim.
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