Welcome! Log In Create A New Profile Recent Posts
Yosemite Valley

The Moon is Waxing Gibbous (75% of Full)

JanSport - Accept no Imitations. The Original Backpack since 1967.


Advanced

Yellowstone Fire Update: August 27, 2011

All posts are those of the individual authors and the owner of this site does not endorse them. Content should be considered opinion and not fact until verified independently.

avatar Yellowstone Fire Update - August 26
August 26, 2011 06:19PM
August 26, 2011 - 12:30 p.m.

Five new fires were discovered in Yellowstone National Park on Thursday, August 25. The Heart Lake Fire was discovered Thursday morning; the other four were reported late Thursday afternoon. All five are small lightning caused fires burning in the backcountry.

Heart Fire
This fire is located in the south central portion of the park, about a half mile northeast of Heart Lake. This lightning caused fire was reported Thursday morning, August 25. It is one-tenth of an acre. As a precaution, firefighters will set up structure protection at the Heart Lake Patrol Cabin, which is about a mile from the heel of the fire.

Sour Fire
Discovered Thursday afternoon, August 25, this fire is several miles southeast of Canyon Village and west of the junction of the Wapiti (WAH-puh-tee) Lake and Astringent Creek trails. Due to its location, the park has temporarily closed some nearby backcountry campsites and trail segments. It is one-tenth of an acre in size.

Point Fire
This small fire, one-tenth of an acre in size, was also reported Thursday afternoon, August 25. It is located on the east shore of Yellowstone Lake, between Elk Point and Park Point.

Huckleberry Fire
This fire was spotted Thursday afternoon, August 25 northeast of the park's South Entrance. This fire is burning in dense, old growth forest and can produce a smoke column visible from the South Entrance road. Currently one-tenth of an acre in size, it is expected to grow in the coming days.

A fifth, yet unnamed fire has been reported on the Pitchstone Plateau in the southwest corner of the park. Firefighters will travel into this remote site Friday for a size-up.

All five of these new fires will be managed as the Heart Complex.

The one other active fire burning in the park is the Gibbon Fire. It was discovered on July 12. This lightning caused fire is burning in the backcountry 3 miles east of Madison Junction. It is currently six acres. The Gibbon Fire received over one-third of an inch of rain Thursday, which has significantly reduced fire activity.

Yellowstone National Park is part of a larger fire adapted ecosystem. Fire plays an important role in maintaining the health of this area's wildlife habitat and vegetation. All of these lightning caused fires are being managed to allow natural process to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

The fire danger in Yellowstone is "Very High". Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves, and smoking materials. There have been 14 fires reported in Yellowstone this year.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors.

The latest information on backcountry access is available by contacting Backcountry Offices throughout the park or by calling 307-344-2160 during normal business hours, seven days a week. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways. Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/.
avatar Yellowstone Fire Update: August 27, 2011
August 27, 2011 01:50PM
Heart Complex Update: August 27, 2011 - 2:00 p.m.

Recent thunderstorms packed with lightning added a sixth small fire to the five currently being managed in Yellowstone National Park since August 25 as the Heart Complex.

The 0.1-acre Prospect Fire, located one mile southwest of Tower Village, was discovered yesterday afternoon. It will be suppressed today using three Yellowstone wildland firefighters supported by helicopter bucket work because of its proximity to the developed Tower Village concessioner and campground areas, the continuous fuels available in the area and the prevailing southwest winds over the fire.

All five Heart Complex fires are small lightning caused fires burning in the backcountry areas of the park with varying degrees of behavior and growth potential. All but one are approximately one-tenth of an acre or less and all are being managed under a Type 3 organization to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

Heart Fire. 0.1 acres. Burning one mile to the east of the Heart Lake patrol cabin and a half mile north of Heart Lake and the Continental Divide Trail. Minimal growth and activity today, and moderate potential for growth toward Yellowstone Lake through a mix of fire scars from the past 30 years. Previous plans for structural protection of the patrol cabin have been suspended due to the limited activity of this fire.

Sour Fire. 0.1 acres. Burning in a single tree along the Wapiti Lake Trail east of Canyon Village on the Mirror Plateau. Fire managers will continually reassess the need for trail and campground closures in proximity to this fire. Temporarily closures are already in place in some nearby backcountry campsites and trail segments.

Point Fire. 0.1 acres. Burning in one rotting log surrounded by green fuels on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake near the Thorofare Trail between Park Point and Elk Point. Low potential for growth while adjacent herbaceous fuels remain green. The area to the east of this fire is dominated by extensive fire history less than 10 years old.

Huckleberry Fire. 0.1 acres. Burning south of the Snake River and South Boundary Trail two miles from the southern boundary of the park in heavy downed and dead lodgepole pine. Minimal growth and activity today. Moderate to high potential for growth with potential to reach the Teton Wilderness outside the park before the fire season ending event. Because of its proximity to the park's South Entrance, a smoke column may be visible from the entrance road.

Gibbon Fire. 6 to 10 acres, burning since July 12th approximately three miles southeast of Madison Junction in mature and regenerated lodgepole pine. Protection measures continue today including the placement of pumps and sprinklers along a power line easement located one mile to the north of the fire. An updated perimeter map and on-site fuel samples are also being collected today. A small smoke column may be visible along the Grand Loop Road between Madison Junction and Gibbon Falls.

In the past 24 hours, more than 660 lightning strikes have been recorded within the park. An unnamed fire reported August 25 on the Pitchstone Plateau in the southwest corner of the park has not been located. Crews will continue to fly the area over the next few days to try and locate it.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "Very High." Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. There have been 14 fires reported in Yellowstone this year.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors.

The latest information on backcountry access is available by contacting Backcountry Offices throughout the park or by calling 307-344-2160 during normal business hours, seven days a week. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways. Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/27/2011 02:11PM by eeek.
avatar Yellowstone Heart Complex Fire Update: August 28, 2011 - 2:00 p.m.
August 28, 2011 02:41PM
Heart Complex Update: August 28, 2011 - 2:00 p.m.

A small lightning caused fire was discovered Saturday afternoon in the southwest corner of Yellowstone National Park. This brings to seven the number of small wildland fires currently burning since August 25 in the park's backcountry.

The half-acre Ouzel Fire is located in the southwest corner of the park 17 miles southwest of Old Faithful and five miles east of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest boundary. The fire is burning on the ground with occasional single tree torching, and is suspected to be the fire Yellowstone fire crews had previously been unable to locate for the past two days. Because of its proximity to the Three Rivers patrol cabin, structural protection measures will be readied in the event of increased fire activity.

The Ouzel Fire will be managed as part of the Heart Complex, a series of small lightning caused fires burning in the backcountry areas of the park with varying degrees of behavior and growth potential. All but one of these fires are less than an acre in size, and all are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

Heart Fire. 0.1 acres, burning a half mile north of Heart Lake in the south central portion of the park.

Sour Fire. 0.1 acres, burning east of Canyon Village on the Mirror Plateau.

Point Fire. 0.1 acres, burning on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake.

Huckleberry Fire. 0.1 acres, burning two miles from the southern boundary of the park.

Gibbon Fire. 14 acres, burning three miles southeast of Madison Junction.

The Prospect Fire was suppressed yesterday using three Yellowstone wildland firefighters supported by helicopter bucket work because of its proximity to Tower Fall store and campground. It is currently in controlled status.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "Very High." Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. There have been 15 fires reported in Yellowstone this year.

The latest information on backcountry access is available by contacting Backcountry Offices throughout the park or by calling 307-344-2160 during normal business hours, seven days a week. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways. Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/.
avatar Yellowstone Heart Complex Fire Update: September 2, 2011 - 11:00 a.m.
September 02, 2011 01:01PM
Eight small, wildland fires continue to burn in Yellowstone National Park's backcountry, including a new fire that was reported Wednesday in the extreme northwest corner of the park. All but one have been caused by a series of heavy lightning storms passing over the region in the past several days.

The Specimen Fire is located along the east fork of Specimen Creek approximately a half mile from High Lake and a third of a mile from the boundary of the Gallatin National Forest. Due to its proximity to the forest, Yellowstone and Gallatin wildland fire managers determined that suppressing the fire would be the best management strategy.

The following seven fires are being managed as part of the Heart Complex. All but two of these fires are at or less than one acre in size and all are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

Gibbon Fire. 15-18 acres, burning three miles southeast of Madison Junction.

Point Fire. 5-7 acres, burning on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake.

Ouzel Fire. 1 acre, burning five miles from the western boundary with the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

Huckleberry Fire. 0.1 acre, burning two miles from the southern boundary of the park.

Heart Fire. 0.1 acre, burning a half mile north of Heart Lake in the south central portion of the park.

Sour Fire. 0.1 acre, burning east of Canyon Village on the Mirror Plateau.

Pitchstone Fire. 0.1 acre, located on the Pitchstone Plateau in the park's southwestern corner. Its cause has yet to be determined by wildland fire crews.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "High." Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. There have been 18 fires reported in Yellowstone this year.

The latest information on backcountry access is available by contacting Backcountry Offices throughout the park or by calling 307-344-2160 during normal business hours, seven days a week. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways. Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/.
avatar Yellowstone Fire Update - September 6, 2011 - 2:00 p.m.
September 09, 2011 03:33PM
Heart Complex: September 6, 2011 - 2:00 p.m.

The Point Fire on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake increased to 1,100 acres over Labor Day weekend, driven by steady winds and increasingly drier weather conditions.

The fire is burning in downed and dead logs with single and group tree torching behavior increasing in the afternoons. As a precautionary measure, the Thorofare Trail has been closed from the Nine Mile Trailhead to one mile south of the fire area. Smoke will likely be visible around the eastern edge of the lake and on portions of the East Entrance road.

Five lightning caused wildland fires, managed as the Heart Complex, continue to burn in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.

The Gibbon Fire, burning three miles southeast of Madison Junction, has seen little new fire activity and remains estimated at 16-18 acres.

Three other fires, the Ouzel, Huckleberry and Pitchstone are all one acre or less in size. They are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

The Sour Fire, which was burning east of Canyon Village, and the Heart Fire, which was burning north of Heart Lake, were declared out at a tenth of an acre, September 4 and 6, respectively.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors.

When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways. Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/. The Point Fire may also be observed from the Fire Lookout web cam on Mount Washburn at http://www.nps.gov/yell/photosmultimedia/webcams.htm.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "Very High," and continued warm and dry weather with little precipitation is predicted for the next week. Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. There have been 18 fires reported in Yellowstone this year.

The latest information on backcountry access is available at park Visitor Centers or Backcountry Offices.


NPS
The Point Fire seen from atop Mt. Washburn
avatar Yellowstone Fire Update - September 11
September 12, 2011 01:20PM
A new lightning caused fire, the Trischman Fire, was detected Saturday afternoon and is estimated at 3-5 acres. It is located in a remote area 4.5 miles west of Shoshone Lake and 6 miles southwest of Old Faithful. This fire is being suppressed with 16 smokejumpers and supported by Yellowstone's Lama Helicopter. Even though the fire is in a remote area fire managers felt it necessary to suppress it, largely to minimize any potential impact to the Old Faithful area.

Five other lightning caused wildland fires, managed as the Heart Complex, continue to burn in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.

The Point Fire on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake is approximately 1,100 acres. It has continued to flare up in the heat of the day as it hit pockets of dead and down vegetation within the perimeter of the fire. A spot in the northeast corner of the fire burned actively Saturday and put up significant smoke. This spot is located between the the 2003 East Fire and the rest of the fire. Crews continued to monitor the fire and provide protection for the Clear Creek Cabin. Smoke will likely be visible around the eastern edge of the lake and on portions of the East Entrance road. The Thorofare Trail has been closed from the Nine Mile Trailhead to one mile south of the fire area.

The following four fires are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

The Gibbon Fire, burning three miles southeast of Madison Junction, has seen little new fire activity and remains estimated at 16-18 acres. It has been burning since July 12th.

The Ouzel Fire is 3 acres in size and has shown little activity in the last few days. The fire is located 5 miles from the west boundary with the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The Huckleberry is estimated at 1-2 acres and is located 2 miles from the south boundary with the Bridger-Teton National Forest. Little activity has been seen on the fire for several days.

The Pitchstone Fire is located on Pitchstone Plateau and is less than 0.1 acre, it also has had minimal activity.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways.

Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/. The Point Fire may also be observed from the Fire Lookout web cam on Mount Washburn at http://www.nps.gov/yell/photosmultimedia/webcams.htm.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "Very High," and continued warm and dry weather with little precipitation is predicted for the next week. Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. The latest information on backcountry access is available at park Visitor Centers or Backcountry Offices.
avatar Yellowstone Heart Complex: September 13, 2011 - 10:00 a.m.
September 13, 2011 12:14PM
Heart Complex: September 13, 2011 - 10:00 a.m.

The Trischman Fire in Yellowstone National Park's south central region was declared 100 percent contained today.

Sixteen smokejumpers supported by Yellowstone's Lama Helicopter suppressed the fire over the past 48 hours given its available fuel load and potential impact to populated park areas. The three-acre, lightning caused fire had been located in a remote area 4.5 miles west of Shoshone Lake and 6 miles southwest of Old Faithful.

Five other lightning caused wildland fires, managed as the Heart Complex, continue to burn in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.

The Point Fire on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake is approximately 1,100 acres and continues to burn in pockets of dead and down timber. Several spots burning in the northeast corner of the fire close to the site of the 2003 East Fire created a significant amount of smoke over the lake area, which has also been visible from the East Entrance road over the past several days. Crews continue to monitor the fire and provide protection for the Clear Creek Cabin. The Thorofare Trail remains closed from the Nine Mile Trailhead to one mile south of the fire area.

Four other small fires, the Gibbon, Ouzel, Huckleberry and Pitchstone are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways.

Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/. The Point Fire may also be observed from the Fire Lookout web cam on Mount Washburn at http://www.nps.gov/yell/photosmultimedia/webcams.htm.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "Very High." Scattered rain and isolated thunderstorms are predicted this next week, with temperatures in the high 60s during the day and near freezing at night. Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. The latest information on backcountry access is available at park Visitor Centers or Backcountry Offices.
avatar Yellowstone Fire Update - September 16, 2011 - 3:30 p.m.
September 16, 2011 03:39PM
Heart Complex: September 16, 2011 - 3:30 p.m.


Six fires which continue to burn in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park are being managed as the Heart Complex.

By far the largest of the six is the Point Fire, on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake. It has grown slowly in recent days and is now estimated at 1,800 acres. Activity on the northeast corner of the fire, close to the site of 2003's East Fire, has resulted in a significant amount of smoke over Yellowstone Lake and portions of the East Entrance road in recent days. Crews continue to monitor the fire and provide protection for the Clear Creek Cabin. The Thorofare Trail remains closed from the Nine Mile Trailhead to one mile south of the fire area.

The Trischman Fire, 6 miles southwest of Old Faithful, was declared controlled Friday at just under 6 acres.

Four other small fires, the Gibbon, Ouzel, Huckleberry and Pitchstone are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways.

Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/. The Point Fire may also be observed from the Fire Lookout web cam on Mount Washburn at http://www.nps.gov/yell/photosmultimedia/webcams.htm.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone Friday was downgraded from "Very High" to "Moderate". This reflects the impacts of recent rainfall, cooler temperatures, and shorter days.

The National Weather Service forecast calls cooler temperatures with rain and snow showers over the park through Saturday. Clearing conditions and warmer temperatures are set to return to the region by the middle of next week.

Despite the change in the fire danger rating, visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials.

The latest information on backcountry access is available at park Visitor Centers or Backcountry Offices.
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login