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Spruce Fire Now Over 2000 Acres

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avatar Lightning Starts Small Fire in Yellowstone
September 11, 2015 02:24PM
A new wildland fire is burning in Yellowstone National Park. The Spruce fire, discovered Wednesday, September 9, by the park helicopter, is estimated to be a tenth of an acre in size. It is located in a wooded area ten miles west of Fishing Bridge and two miles south of Hayden Valley in the central portion of the park. The fire, likely caused by lightning from scattered storms that passed through the area at least five days ago, is smoldering and creeping through a mixed conifer forest. It is not threatening any structures or roads and will be monitored by park fire crews and allowed to play its natural role in the ecosystem. There are currently no area closures due to the fire.

There are now two fires burning within Yellowstone National Park. The 5L4 fire on the Promontory Peninsula at the south end of Yellowstone Lake was reported on August 24, and is currently 16 acres and not very active. Fire crews are managing the fire for its benefits to park resources. Backcountry campsites 5L3, 5L4, and 6A1 continue to be closed due to the 5L4 fire.

The fire danger in Yellowstone National Park is currently "High." There are no fire restrictions in place, however, campfires are only allowed in designated grills in park campgrounds, some picnic areas, and specific backcountry campsites. The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group, which consists of top federal and state fire managers, dropped the National Fire Preparedness Level down from 5, the highest level possible, to 4, on September 6. Preparedness level 4 reflects a high degree of wildfire activity, a major commitment of fire resources, and the probability that severe conditions will continue for at least a few days. There are currently 43 large fires or complexes of fires, burning in six states across the west.
avatar Spruce Fire Increases in Size to 425 Acres
September 12, 2015 04:23PM
The Spruce Fire burning in Yellowstone National Park has grown significantly since its discovery on Wednesday, September 9. Warmer weather and low humidity levels have allowed the fire to grow to an estimated 425 acres as of 11 am on Saturday. While fire activity increased significantly on Friday afternoon, a helicopter overflight this morning showed reduced activity, with mostly backing and smoldering. However, as temperatures increase, and relative humidity levels decrease throughout Saturday afternoon, fire managers expect to see the fire activity levels pick up again as the day progresses. The fire’s smoke has been very visible from locations in all directions, but no structures or roads are threatened and there are no closures due to the fire.

The Spruce Fire is located in a wooded area ten miles west of Fishing Bridge and two miles south of Hayden Valley in the central portion of the park. The fire, likely caused by lightning from scattered storms that passed through the area in early September, is burning in a forest of fire-adapted lodgepole pines. Park fire crews are monitoring the fire and allowing it to play its natural role in the ecosystem. A webcam at the Mount Washburn Fire Lookout shows excellent views of the smoke column.

A much smaller fire, the 5L4 Fire on the Promontory Peninsula at the south end of Yellowstone Lake, was reported on August 24, and is currently 16 acres and not very active. Fire crews are also managing this fire for its benefits to park resources. Backcountry campsites 5L3, 5L4, and 6A1 continue to be closed due to the 5L4 Fire. The fire danger in Yellowstone National Park is currently “High.” There are no fire restrictions in place, however, campfires are only allowed in designated grills in park campgrounds, some picnic areas, and specific backcountry campsites. The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group, which consists of top federal and state fire managers, dropped the National Fire Preparedness Level down from 5, the highest level possible, to 4, on September 6. Preparedness level 4 reflects a high degree of wildfire activity, a major commitment of fire resources, and the probability that severe conditions will continue for at least a few days. There are currently 37 large fires or complexes of fires, burning in six states across the west. For up-to-date information on fires burning across the country, go to http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/. To learn more about fire management in Yellowstone, visit http://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/management/firemanagement.htm.
avatar Spruce Fire Now Over 2000 Acres
September 14, 2015 12:34PM
The lightning-caused Spruce Fire, burning in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park since early September, has grown to an estimated 2,119 acres as of 1:30 pm on Sunday. Crews are actively monitoring the fire by air and from lookout points on Mount Washburn and other locations throughout the park. The Spruce fire is burning in a fire-adapted lodgepole pine forest, approximately ten miles west of Fishing Bridge and two miles south of Hayden Valley in the central portion of Yellowstone. Smoke from the fire has been visible throughout the park and in surrounding communities;however, no facilities, trails, or roads are threatened and there are no closures in place.

The fire continues to play its natural role in the ecosystem and crews are managing it for its benefits to park resources. It is burning in a typical mosaic pattern within the fire's perimeter, with overall fire activity picking up in the afternoon as temperatures rise, relative humidity levels drop, and gusty winds increase. On Sunday, hazy smoke from wildland fires burning in California and parts of Idaho likely played a role in moderating the fire's activity and spread. A change in the weather forecast for Monday calls for cloudier, cooler, and wetter conditions.

A much smaller fire, the 5L4 Fire on the Promontory Peninsula at the south end of Yellowstone Lake, was reported on August 24, is currently 16 acres and not very active. Fire crews are also managing this fire for its benefits to park resources. Backcountry campsites 5L3, 5L4, and 6A1 continue to be closed due to the 5L4 Fire.

The decision on managing each fire in the park is based on a number of factors, including current and predicted conditions, as well as potential values at risk. There have been two additional park fires that have been suppressed in the past week, a human-caused fire in Mammoth Hot Springs on September 10, and a lightning-caused fire near the northwest boundary of the park on September 12.

The fire danger in Yellowstone National Park is currently "High." There are no fire restrictions in place, however, campfires are only allowed in designated grills in park campgrounds, some picnic areas, and specific backcountry campsites.

For up-to-date information on fires burning across the country, go to http://inciweb.nwcg.gov.
avatar Spruce Fire Received Significant Rain Overnight
September 15, 2015 03:06PM
The lightning-caused Spruce Fire, burning in the backcountry of Yellowstone National, received significant rain overnight on Monday. The fire had grown to an estimated 2,594 acres as of noon on Monday, before storms moved into the area, dropping approximately .5 inches by Tuesday morning. Weather forecasts call for continued damp weather throughout the next few days. Fire activity has greatly diminished, but the fire is still burning in some areas. Crews will continue to monitor the fire while it plays its natural role in the ecosystem. Smoke from the fire may continue to be visible throughout the park and in surrounding communities;however, no facilities, trails, or roads are threatened and there are no closures in place. To learn more about the role fire plays in the ecosystem, visit http://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/fireconsequences.htm.

A much smaller fire, the 5L4 Fire on the Promontory Peninsula at the south end of Yellowstone Lake, was reported on August 24. It was last estimated to be 16 acres and is still burning, though it has not been very active in the last two weeks. Fire activity picked up slightly on Monday afternoon, as gusty winds ushered in the storms, but that was quickly dampened by the overnight rain. Fire crews are also managing this fire for its benefits to park resources. Backcountry campsites 5L3, 5L4, and 6A1 continue to be closed due to the 5L4 Fire.

The decision on how to manage each fire in the park is based on a number of factors, including current and predicted conditions, as well as potential values at risk. There have been two additional park fires that have been suppressed in the last five days: a human-caused fire in Mammoth Hot Springs on September 10 and a lightning-caused fire near the northwest boundary of the park on September 12.

The decision on how to manage each fire in the park is based on a number of factors, including current and predicted conditions, as well as potential values at risk. There have been two additional park fires that have been suppressed in the last five days: a human-caused fire in Mammoth Hot Springs on September 10 and a lightning-caused fire near the northwest boundary of the park on September 12.

The fire danger in Yellowstone National Park is currently "High." There are no fire restrictions in place, however, campfires are allowed only in designated grills in park campgrounds, some picnic areas, and specific backcountry campsites.
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