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Re: Backpacking food

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avatar Backpacking food
April 22, 2009 11:48PM
Other than the freezed dried, expensive packets. What do you like to eat while backpacking?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 22, 2009 11:58PM
Quote
eeek
Other than the freezed dried, expensive packets. What do you like to eat while backpacking?

no more freeze dried! It is now Summer sasuage, 1 luxury can of baked beans, Pecan Nuts, Fruit cup, and dried Sweet Potato wedges (and an assorted variation on the theme; most important is the protien because it lasts longest).

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:02AM
I would bring one can of chicken meat and add that to a pot of ramen along with some freeze dried peas (peas do very well with freeze drying) and a bit of thyme or sage. That was always the best meal of the trip.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:08AM
Quote
eeek
I would bring one can of chicken meat and add that to a pot of ramen along with some freeze dried peas (peas do very well with freeze drying) and a bit of thyme or sage. That was always the best meal of the trip.

When I used to BP on the coast, one of my friends ALWAYS brought the ramen and would share and exchange a bit, so I never carried it. Mixing the Summer sasuage into the baked beans was my highlight meal.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:20AM
Summer sausage reminds me: I often would bring dry salami on trips. The salty goodness hit the spot.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:09AM
Toasted oatmeal with milk, sugar, and butter in the morning with a cup of hot chocolate
Vienna Sausage with mayo and Del Scorcho sauce, rye crisps with humus and mayo at lunch
6oz tuna packet with mayo and Del Scorcho sauce for dinner
Nut/fruit bars, M&M peanut, corn nuts, tea,

Ramen three meals a day for five days. Tobasco, jerkey, and catsup added
Pancakes with butter and real maple syrup.
Real scrambled eggs with butter in a flour tortilla
Canned string beans carried by another
Quesadillas with chicken added
Dried potatoes in packets various flavors
Fig Newtons
Jerkey
Cheetos, Fritos, etc.
Foster's Bitter
Guiness Draft

Other stuff too.
Bushmills once and only once. What a painful trip that was.
Body fat



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:18AM
I tried bring oatmeal once. Most of it was intact after the trip. I'd forgotten how much I hate that stuff.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 05:34AM
Quote
eeek
I tried bring oatmeal once. Most of it was intact after the trip. I'd forgotten how much I hate that stuff.
I couldn't give it away during a backpack in Glacier.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 05:52AM
Surely Muir had something to say about food to take on a trip into the woods.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 11:09AM
Quote
Frank Furter
Surely Muir had something to say about food to take on a trip into the woods.

From what I've read a bag of dried beans was his usual.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 11:15AM
Quote
Frank Furter
Surely Muir had something to say about food to take on a trip into the woods.

"I rolled up some bread and tea in a pair of blankets with some sugar and a tin cup and set off."

http://www.climatecrossroad.net/john_muir_exhibit/life/john_muir_menu_j_parker_huber.html
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 11:37AM
Hmmm, Muir had no body fat, carried a 80 lb pack, went 20+ miles a day mostly cross country at altitude, and lived on a biscuit and an cup of tea? I think John did some leg pulling when it came to describing his food stores. What was in that pack anyway? A typewriter?



Old Dude
Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 11:39AM
Quote
vdrummer

"I rolled up some bread and tea in a pair of blankets with some sugar and a tin cup and set off."

http://www.climatecrossroad.net/john_muir_exhibit/life/john_muir_menu_j_parker_huber.html

I always like reading stuff like this to wash my mind out after looking at some forums, where they "need" $400 hiking boots, $500 tents, $600 sleeping bags, and $200 hiking poles, not to mention the latest upscale hiker clothing to get where they're going. Keeps things in perspective.



Gary
Yosemite Photo Galleries: http://www.pbase.com/roberthouse/yo
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:15PM
I wonder if Muir's choice of food helped reduce his contacts with grizzlies which I think were still around during his time in the Sierras. I heard a "Muir impersonator" presentation in Yosemite one summer and recall that the actor made some reference to Muir's diet of bread and tea and certain disparaging comments attributed to Muir directed at those who needed to bring lots of food including dairy products into the mountains. Back then, cooking utensils involved cast iron pans and grates over rocks. I can imagine an 80 lb pack easily. What amazes me it that he could sleep under the stars with just a wool blanket.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 07:19AM
I use toasted rolled oats available at TJs. They require 3-5 minutes of cooking. Totally different than any of the "just add hot water" slop which I can't eat either.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 08:57AM
Quote
mrcondron
I use toasted rolled oats available at TJs. They require 3-5 minutes of cooking. Totally different than any of the "just add hot water" slop which I can't eat either.

I know about these -- I grew up on them! they stay "intact" after the water soak; they don't turn into mush. They are excellent for Oatmeal cookies (to take on trips or eat before you get out the door wink)

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:21AM
Quote
mrcondron
Toasted oatmeal with milk, sugar, and butter in the morning with a cup of hot chocolate
Vienna Sausage with mayo and Del Scorcho sauce, rye crisps with humus and mayo at lunch
6oz tuna packet with mayo and Del Scorcho sauce for dinner
Nut/fruit bars, M&M peanut, corn nuts, tea,

Ramen three meals a day for five days. Tobasco, jerkey, and catsup added
Pancakes with butter and real maple syrup.
Real scrambled eggs with butter in a flour tortilla
Canned string beans carried by another
Quesadillas with chicken added
Dried potatoes in packets various flavors
Fig Newtons
Jerkey
Cheetos, Fritos, etc.
Foster's Bitter
Guiness Draft

Other stuff too.
Bushmills once and only once. What a painful trip that was.
Body fat

...Gonna track you down on the trail and sit in on a meal...I don't think that I have ever had three meals in a day... I do like that packaged tuna, but I never thought to bring the mayo. I realize how unimaginative my menu is!
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:23AM
What, no pretzels?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:34AM
Quote
eeek
What, no pretzels?

I used to bring pretzels, but I found that they tear up my mouth after a while (and impede on my ability to talk...all would view as a tragedy wink)

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 12:43AM
Quote
Bee
Quote
eeek
What, no pretzels?

I used to bring pretzels, but I found that they tear up my mouth after a while (and impede on my ability to talk...all would view as a tragedy wink)

B

I like the complex carbohydate and salt.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 03:19AM
Rocky Road freeze-dried ice cream?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 08:56AM
I've been experimenting with various Mountain House freeze dried meals and agree many of them could still use some improvement. One exception, at least for me, was their Pasta Primavira. Will definitely be taking that one.

Not much for oatmeal at breakfast but the instant Cream of Wheat works for me.

Jim
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 10:46AM
All the pasta sides by Lipton, Knoor, etc. Cook 7 min with milk and butter.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 01:55PM
Mike,

Yes, those pasta sides are excellent but the milk & butter stay behind.

Jim
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 02:25PM
I carry about one stick of butter in a wide mouth 4oz nalgene bottle. The butter stays good. For milk I have little dry milk packets that make 8 oz at a time. The milk and butter help with the sauce a great deal. The milk is also refreshing to drink plain when mixed with cold water.

Some of the pasta sides don't ask for milk and butter or oil, just water.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/23/2009 09:55PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 07:24PM
Regarding milk, I was very disappointed to learn that "Milkman" (stuff in the orange box) dried milk is no longer made, something about too expensive to re-tool the production facility.

For "butter" one can subsitute butter flavored Crisco. Seems to last forever.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 07:26PM
Quote
Frank Furter
For "butter" one can subsitute butter flavored Crisco.

I'd say something about that but it wouldn't be polite.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 08:02PM
Interesting detailed discussion of production of dried milk:

http://waltonfeed.com/old/self/milkmade.html



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 08:10PM
They dry the cow first?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 08:32PM
Quote
eeek
They dry the cow first?

No. That might be easier though. The process appears as complicated as refining/fractionating petroleum.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/23/2009 08:42PM by Frank Furter.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 08:42PM
One other backpacking food we used a lot in Alaska was Pilot Bread or a variation on "hardtack". Haven't been able to find it commercially. Have tried to make some myself without much success. Should be easy based on the internet recipes.

Other thoughts on camp cooking:
1. one of the best ways to cook freshly caught trout is to add a little butter, onion, wine if available and cook in foil over coals.
2. a fun thing to do with kids is to cut an orange in half, hollow out the center and crack an egg into the center of the orange "bowl", cook by placing on coals; becomes a poached egg with slight orange taste
3. baking bread on stick is challenging but good when you can make it adhere to the stick. pillsbury cresent rolls work as I recall.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 11:55PM
Quote
Frank Furter
Regarding milk, I was very disappointed to learn that "Milkman" (stuff in the orange box) dried milk is no longer made, something about too expensive to re-tool the production facility.

For "butter" one can subsitute butter flavored Crisco. Seems to last forever.

Ciao, baby to the "Milkman" in the orange box!!! That eternally lumpy stuff with the blue cast to it -- YUCK.

I had my first taste of "real" milk when i was about 8 years old and I thought that it was a milkshake!

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 12:00AM
The dry milk packets I use make tasty milk. No lumps and no dry milk taste. We had Carnation dry milk in the house all my life and we drank only skim milk from the bottle most of the time. The packets I use remind me of the bottled skim. Not bad.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 12:07AM
Quote
mrcondron
The dry milk packets I use make tasty milk. No lumps and no dry milk taste. We had Carnation dry milk in the house all my life and we drank only skim milk from the bottle most of the time. The packets I use remind me of the bottled skim. Not bad.

What brand are these packets -- are they still the Carnation you used before?

Now that I drink fat-free milk, I am sure that the packet milk would probably not taste much different.In that case, I could bring along one of my favorite snack foods: Cereal!

Bee
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 07:12AM
Bee,
Minimus sells all sorts of things packaged smally but not cheaply.

Here is the milk:

http://www.minimus.biz/detail.aspx?ID=7267



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 09:46PM
Quote
mrcondron
I carry about one stick of butter in a wide mouth 4oz nalgene bottle. The butter stays good. For milk I have little dry milk packets that make 8 oz at a time. The milk and butter help with the sauce a great deal. The milk is also refreshing to drink plain when mixed with cold water.

Some of the pasta sides don't ask for mike and butter or oil, just water.

Mike, it sounds like you are mixing up a yummy Alfredo sauce (need a bit of parmesan cheese to round it out; its dried and easy to carry)

My mother never put butter in the refrigerator (which was so creaky that it did not help much, anyway) and it kept and kept -- never went bad.

If you ever decide to have Outdoor Cooking Seminars, let me know and I will sign up; some of these ideas are very inventive compared to my Summer Sasuage.

Bee
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 23, 2009 11:08PM
Wasn't Muir big on just taking a bag of flour? Apparently he would just make sun-dried bread made from this flour with water. Apparently he didn't try to "live off the land".

http://www.sierraclub.org/John_Muir_exhibit/questions_and_answers/index.html

Quote

It appears that he rarely ate from the land. He talked of bringing flour, or home-made sun-baked flour-and-water "bread" along with some tea on his outings. He would stop sometimes at lumber camps (!) to get a bite to eat! He often just sort of fasted in his travels, eating when he could. He used to complain that bread was a limiting factor for his travels. Lakes weren't stocked with fish when he spent his time in the Sierra, so he couldn't fish, although he was known to have eaten trout when staying at a Yosemite hotel in his later years.

As for my choices - the closest thing I know of to freeze-dried food that you can find in almost any supermarket is Idahoan brand flavored mashed potatoes in the 4 oz packets. Each packet reconstitutes with 16 oz of boiled water and should be ready in a minute. They contain all the dairy and flavoring ingredients. They cost maybe $1-2 each depending on where you find it. General Mills has something similar that only needs hot water, but they don't taste nearly as good. These aren't the kind in boxes that require milk or heating other than boiled water. Idahoan does have an "original" version in pouches, but that require milk and heating in a pot.



I also like Starkist tuna in pouches. Not only do they taste better than the canned versions, but they pack light. I prefer the oil-packed versions for the extra calories and better texture.

avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 07:47AM
This was a good day. We had come over from Saddlebag Lake and had done Summit Pass and Virginia Pass. Dale had snuck in the Guiness, chips, and salsa. Nice treat at the end of a hard day.





Old Dude



Edited 5 time(s). Last edit at 04/24/2009 10:44AM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 09:29AM
Quote
mrcondron
This was a good day. We had come over from Saddlebag Lake and had done Summit Pass and Virginia Pass. Dale had snuck in the Guiness, chips, and salsa. Nice treat at the end of a hard day.

Cool!! As you noticed...this combo is a requirement for my menu..YUM

Dale...dale...Yooo-hoo!!! Baah--aaaaaah....we miss yousad smiley

(okay, I do, and thats all that matters!)

Bee
Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 07:49PM
I don't mind he packet oatmeals, but I also bring along some dried blueberries to mix with them. I also prepackage some granola and dried milk in small bags, then just add some water. pita bread or tortillas and humus are a lunch staple, along with jerky. Of course the very most important item is my flask of quality sipping whiskey.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 07:55PM
Quote
dobber
Of course the very most important item is my flask of quality sipping whiskey.

It'd more likely be whisky in mine.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 07:57PM
CCW: Carrying Concealed Whiskey?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 10:57PM
Quote
dobber
I don't mind he packet oatmeals, but I also bring along some dried blueberries to mix with them. I also prepackage some granola and dried milk in small bags, then just add some water. pita bread or tortillas and humus are a lunch staple, along with jerky. Of course the very most important item is my flask of quality sipping whiskey.

a half pint of nice port works for me if I'm car camping, but not for backpacking.
Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 08:15PM
that extra e is to slow you down.

Actually UCW (UnCocealed Whisk(e)y) will get you busted. Last time I was coming into May Lake from Glen Aulin, I met a Ranger who was cleaning up around the lake. We came across an empty campsite that had left a bottle of jack daniels outside their bear container while they went off hiking. the Ranger proceeded to write them a ticket, and I offered that since my flask was about empty I'd gladly "dispose" of the bottle and contents in a safe manner. he decided I was worthy of the job.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 08:20PM
Quote
dobber
that extra e is to slow you down.

The extra e is usually means it's not Scotch.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 24, 2009 10:48PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
dobber
that extra e is to slow you down.

The extra e is usually means it's not Scotch.

On my trip two years ago I met a group of Scottish backpackers on my last night in the backpackers campground. When I mentioned that my original plan was to bring some Highland Park 12 and share it in celebration (I forgot it at home), they noted that it might be a bad idea because they would have likely kept the entire camp awake with the resulting inebriation.

BTW - a Nalgene flask fits nicely in a bear canister.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 07:56AM
F it.
I'm not going away.

Red Peak Pass Goodness:



Had 3 Twinkies and 2 Cupcakes on this trip. One for each Pass. (Chiquito, Fernandez, Post, Red, Merced).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 07:59AM by bill-e-g.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 09:43AM
[quoteF it.
I'm not going away.[/quote]

good!

Quote

Had 3 Twinkies and 2 Cupcakes on this trip. One for each Pass. (Chiquito, Fernandez, Post, Red, Merced).

How many of them per day?? Did you Share??!!

(big secret: I actually like those marshmallow bombs called "Peeps" -- I took some along once)

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 09:48AM
He was alone and when he's not don't even look at the pastries. Stale peanuts in the shell, M&Ms, jerky, water, noodles, OK, but not the Ding Dongs or fruit pies.
He has a five pound padlock on his two pound bear can.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 09:49AM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:04AM
Quote
mrcondron
He was alone and when he's not don't even look at the pastries. Stale peanuts in the shell, M&Ms, jerky, water, noodles, OK, but not the Ding Dongs or fruit pies.

Ahhh, I see that friendship has its limits -- draw the line at the GOODIESFeed ME!

Quote

He has a five pound padlock on his two pound bear can.

Now I know whose carrying the important stuff

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:30AM
Twinkies, Cupcakes, Ding Dongs, fruit pies???

Sounds like a take-out order from Denny's.

What does this have to do with food?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:35AM
Isn't Twinkies one of the new food groups?

At least I think that is what the sixth grade teacher told me.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 03:25PM
Quote
bill-e-g

At least I think that is what the sixth grade teacher told me.



Recipes from Mrs. Denny's class (Trinity Site Elementary School, Alamogordo, N.M.):
http://www.hostesscakes.com/recipes.asp



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 03:25PM by szalkowski.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 03:39PM
I looked some over. The Ho Ho Fruit Kabob one smacks of an elaborately written peanut butter and jelly sandwich recipe, the type you would have to write in order to teach a nomad in the steppes of Tien Shan via mail how to make a PBJ. I guess Hostess knows their audience.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 04:19PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 04:12PM
Quote
mrcondron
I looked some over. The kabob one smacks of an elaborately written peanut butter and jelly sandwich recipe, the type you would have to write in order to teach a nomad in the steppes of Tien Shan via mail how to make a PBJ. I guess Hostess knows their audience.

Ok Smarty Pants.

Let's see YOU make the Bunny Cakes!

..
..

(seriously, can you make them???... they look delicious!)
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 04:20PM
The thing is probably lethal.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 04:26PM
Quote
mrcondron
The thing is probably lethal.

So is life.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 04:28PM
Yeah, enjoy the journey, the destination sucks.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 11:46AM
When I was a kid, we used to go day packing as a family, each child carrying a little canvas knapsack. Inside each sack was a little gem: a can of Fanta l'aranciata, an Italian version of Orange Soda, except that it was made with REAL orange juice (there would be pulp at the bottom of the can). Mother would wrap each can in cloth and foil, hoping to keep it cold (it never worked) We all got used to drinking them warm, and I STILL crave orange soda when I hike or pack.

Bee
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 02:25PM
Quote
Bee
When I was a kid, we used to go day packing as a family, each child carrying a little canvas knapsack. Inside each sack was a little gem: a can of Fanta l'aranciata, an Italian version of Orange Soda, except that it was made with REAL orange juice (there would be pulp at the bottom of the can). Mother would wrap each can in cloth and foil, hoping to keep it cold (it never worked) We all got used to drinking them warm, and I STILL crave orange soda when I hike or pack.

Bee

Try Orangina
I get it at Trader Joes
Sounds kinda like what your describing
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 02:45PM
Quote
Dan-O
Quote
Bee
When I was a kid, we used to go day packing as a family, each child carrying a little canvas knapsack. Inside each sack was a little gem: a can of Fanta l'aranciata, an Italian version of Orange Soda, except that it was made with REAL orange juice (there would be pulp at the bottom of the can). Mother would wrap each can in cloth and foil, hoping to keep it cold (it never worked) We all got used to drinking them warm, and I STILL crave orange soda when I hike or pack.

Bee

Try Orangina
I get it at Trader Joes
Sounds kinda like what your describing

I always liked (grapefruit-flavored) Orelia, but that was discontinued in favor of just Orangina - at least for US sales.



There is Sanpelligrino Aranciata in cans or bottles (where you can see the pulp).





Anyone remember Bubble Up? Nasty tasting stuff, but I remember it as far back as the mid-80s. Pepsi used to distribute it, but I don't think they actually made it.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 03:00PM
Quote
y_p_w
Anyone remember Bubble Up? Nasty tasting stuff, but I remember it as far back as the mid-80s.

It was better in its early days.

Quote

Pepsi used to distribute it, but I don't think they actually made it.

It was was distributed by Coca-Cola before they came up with Sprite.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 03:10PM
When I was growing up. Rolling on floor laugh (ok, not there yet!)
Mom would buy us "Jolly Good" soda. My favorite was Orange.
Jolly Good Soda - It's Real Good
Before the days of "soda is a substitute for water and milk" ... soda was a real treat.
So with much fondness I think of those days at the cottage in summer.
Whenever I guy grape or orange soda the wifie just rolls her eyes...
"you don't REALLY like that do you!?!?"
"um, yes I do... and I like Spaghettios too! (ok... not so much)"
But I do bring Chef-boy-r-dee Ravioli backpacking sometimes too..
no stove required... eat it right out o the can...
Not sure it meets the food requirement either though.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 05:41PM
Quote
bill-e-g
When I was growing up. Rolling on floor laugh (ok, not there yet!)
Mom would buy us "Jolly Good" soda. My favorite was Orange.
Jolly Good Soda - It's Real Good
Before the days of "soda is a substitute for water and milk" ... soda was a real treat.
So with much fondness I think of those days at the cottage in summer.
Whenever I guy grape or orange soda the wifie just rolls her eyes...
"you don't REALLY like that do you!?!?"
"um, yes I do... and I like Spaghettios too! (ok... not so much)"
But I do bring Chef-boy-r-dee Ravioli backpacking sometimes too..
no stove required... eat it right out o the can...
Not sure it meets the food requirement either though.

hah! We werent the only ones who ate the canned ravioli COLD!!

Heyyyy, I ran over to the TJ and bought some of that Orangina, Dan-O, it DOES taste a bit like L'aranciata.
I am going to sneak some into the hospital when I see my dad. He talks about missing the original orange soda, too.

B
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 05:46PM
Quote
Bee
hah! We werent the only ones who ate the canned ravioli COLD!!

I have to admit to doing that at Deep Creek Hot Springs a few times.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 03:44PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
y_p_w
Anyone remember Bubble Up? Nasty tasting stuff, but I remember it as far back as the mid-80s.

It was better in its early days.

Quote

Pepsi used to distribute it, but I don't think they actually made it.

It was was distributed by Coca-Cola before they came up with Sprite.

I remember it primarily because I knew someone who owned a small restaurant in the mid 80s. Their fountain drinks were originally from Coca-Cola, which included Sprite. One day delivery/service personnel from the local Coca-Cola bottler came in to service and bring in more syrup. They goofed and ended up spraying syrup all over the kitchen, which completely ticked off the owners to the point that they decided to discontinue Coke fountain products and switch the local Pepsi bottler. The owners still sold Coke products - in cans purchased from retail sources. I don't know if it was all the Pepsi bottlers, but this one stocked Bubble Up. I thought it had this sort of off taste compared to Sprite or 7-Up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_up
Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:41AM
I love fresh-baked bread, but in a few days it will be moldy. So it's not the best choice for backpacking food.

Maybe it's not such a bad idea to bring processed food on a long backpacking trip.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:52AM
Honestly I get asked this question alot.
Pasta Roni for dinner has been a keeper for many many years.
Knorr makes some great side dishes that also cook pretty quickly.
(< 7 minutes of boil time)
But pretty much whatever makes you happy as long as it fits in the bear can.
It can even provide some humor. Here's a fruity pie at Benson.
You can also see we brought hard-boiled eggs on this trip for
some breakfast quesadillas.
Mr. Fruit Pie ruled the day on this particular day.
Fortunately his death was quick soon thereafter.
(ok, he probably didn't even make it thru the day)

And, for the record, I always share... just don't go helping yourself
to my goodies like some people's daughters have!
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 12:19PM
Ever wonder where all the thermonuclear waste goes? It's in those things to give them infinite shelf life!

Edit:
I forgot to mention that nacho cheese, the yellow runny stuff, is actually pure thermonuclear waste.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 03:25PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 12:35PM
Quote
mrcondron
Ever wonder where all the thermonuclear waste goes? It's in those things to give them infinite shelf life!

And yet long days of hiking at high altitude can cause one to crave thermonuclear waste.Feed ME!
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 12:44PM
Dale has found the breakfast, lunch, and dinner of champions and it's not Wheaties.

Jim
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 12:47PM
Quote
mrcondron
Ever wonder where all the thermonuclear waste goes? It's in those things to give them infinite shelf life!

Seriously - I thought irradiated food typically used gamma rays, which are just high energy electromagnetic radiation (radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, UV, X-rays, gamma rays). There's no radioactive particle residue like you'd get from bombarding with alpha particles (I've actually done a lab experiment where we tested for short half-life of alpha irradiation) or other types of particle radiation.

There are various means including electron bombardment. The electrons quickly dissipate. Cobalt-60 produces gamma rays as it decays into nickel-60. UV water treatment does something similar, although it doesn't penetrate into food. It's useful for treating water though.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 12:55PM
Quote
y_p_w
(I've actually done a lab experiment where we tested for short half-life of alpha irradiation)

Radioactives aren't the problem. The reason it works is because the gamma rays (or electrons) ionize molecules in the bacteria. But some molecules in the food also become ionized and this can cause bad flavors to develop.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 05:21PM
Quote
eeek
Quote
y_p_w
(I've actually done a lab experiment where we tested for short half-life of alpha irradiation)

Radioactives aren't the problem. The reason it works is because the gamma rays (or electrons) ionize molecules in the bacteria. But some molecules in the food also become ionized and this can cause bad flavors to develop.

FYI info on irradiated food. I thought the use was more prevalent. Note consumer notice required. Sounds like irradiation is primarily for pre-processing control of bacterial growth, rather than sterilization.

from: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/radiation/moremdh/irradfood.html
What foods can currently be irradiated?
Over the years, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved the use of irradiation on a variety of food products, for a number of different purposes. Approved applications vary by type of food. The current list includes:
Wheat and wheat flour. Approved in 1963 by FDA to eliminate insect infestation.
White potatoes. Approved by FDA in 1964 to prevent sprouting.
Spices and vegetable seasonings. Approved by FDA in 1983 to eliminate microbial contamination.
Pork. Approved in 1986 by FDA to inactivate trichina (trichinosis) organisms.
Fruits and vegetables. Approved in 1986 by FDA to eliminate insect infestation, delay growth, and maturation of produce.
Herbs, spices and dry vegetable seasonings. Approved by FDA in 1986 to eliminate insect infestation and microbial contamination.
Dehydrated enzymes. Approved in 1986 by FDA to eliminate microbial contamination.
Animal and pet food. Approved in 1986 by FDA to eliminate microbial contamination.
Papaya fruit. Approved in 1987 by USDA to eliminate insect infestation.
Poultry. Approved by FDA in 1990 and USDA in 1992 to eliminate microbial contamination.
Fresh red meat. Approved by FDA in 1997, for elimination of microbial contamination.
Frozen red meat. Approved by FDA in 1997, for elimination of microbial contamination.

How can I tell if my food has been irradiated?
By law, foods that have been irradiated must be marked with a special logo (right), and labeled with the words "treated with radiation" or "treated by irradiation." Irradiated spices do not need to be labeled if they are used as ingredients in other food products.




The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 05:44PM
While we are on the subject of processed food, it is always worth a few groans to review the FDA allowable contaminants in foods (insects, rodent hairs, etc)
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/dalbook.html



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:08PM
Quote
Frank Furter
While we are on the subject of processed food, it is always worth a few groans to review the FDA allowable contaminants in foods (insects, rodent hairs, etc)
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/dalbook.html

I like how they attribute an "aesthetic" significance to stuff like rodent hair in spices or excrement in other foods.

Frankly people get way too squeamish about stuff that's in their food as if everything undesirable is a potential health hazard. I once grabbed an open bag of Doritos from an end table. I noted a particular spiciness to it that I hadn't noticed before, and my tongue started tickling a bit. It looked more carefully at the bag and noticed all the ants crawling around in there. I stopped eating it only because it seemed a little strange.

Heck - I've consumed boiled and/or disinfectant treated water from streams. There's all sorts of stuff floating around in there. I'm sure some of it used to be some animal's droppings.

How about maybe bringing durian while backpacking? Not sure if it would be a bear attractant or repellent. Never personally ate the stuff, but I have smelled it from a distance. It smelled like the farts of hundreds of people. The description I've heard is that the sensation continuously varies (as it gets closer to the nose) from rotting meat to vomit. Hotels in Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore apparently don't allow guests to bring it into their buildings.



Here's a sign in Singapore banning durian from mass transportation:

avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:21PM
My father was the chief engineer at Hills Brothers coffee in San Francisco through the fifty, sixties, and seventies. He would tell me about how the 1/4 stainless steel chutes that would shuttle coffee beans around would wear through and require plate patches to be welded on. I always wondered where the stainless steel that wore away went.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:25PM
Mike,

The FDA might define stainless steel as roughage. Good for the digestive track and all that.

Jim
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:31PM
Quote
tomdisco
Mike,

The FDA might define stainless steel as roughage. Good for the digestive track and all that.

Jim

Plastics materials for use in reusable bottles/containers and or packaging is FDA approved. Have you ever used a new bottle (even after a few washings) and noted how much it still had that "plastic taste"?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:36PM
I use empty one liter Schweppes Tonic bottles for my water bottles. I have not noticed any plastic taste but I do crave a gin and tonic after a few days.

Actually I use them because they are virtually weightless, bombproof, have just the right size hole for easy drinking, and recyclable. Fortunately for me my mother generates one or two bottles a week. OK, I do help.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:43PM
Quote
mrcondron
I do crave a gin and tonic after a few days.

Why would one destroy good gin by mixing it with icky tonic?
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:44PM
You made me laugh.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:31PM
Of course, since they are prohibited, I am immediately interested in Durians. Can it possibly be worse than certain cheeses, 1000 yr old eggs, or fermented salmon heads?



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:34PM
Quote

fermented salmon heads

Good thing to think about while on a diet. Kills the desire for food right quick.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:39PM
What's wrong with thousand year old eggs? I actually enjoy them with the proper sauce and company.



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:53PM
Quote
mrcondron
What's wrong with thousand year old eggs? I actually enjoy them with the proper sauce and company.

The mind is connected to the nose (actually, the other way around). As I recall the taste was actually bland, but the sulfur and ammonia smell initially was slightly off-putting. The concept of being buried in dirt for months is also a challenge to the palate. But then, bird's nest soup is also an issue.



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:50PM
Of course the antithesis is "Why ruin good tonic with icky gin?"



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:53PM
Quote
mrcondron
Of course the antithesis is "Why ruin good tonic with icky gin?"

Ok, then maybe we should stick with Scotland's finest agricultural product.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:54PM
Lagavulin or Laphroaig?



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:55PM
Quote
mrcondron
Lagavulin or Laphroaig?

The latter of course!
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:57PM
Ah, a man of great taste!



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 06:59PM
Just wish it didn't cost so much...or maybe it's good that it does.

avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 07:01PM
So, do you own your little square inch of land in Scotland?

I hiked the West Highland Way a few years ago. Guiness, whisky, and a Scottish breakfast. Not all at the same time, mind you, but at least once a day. Breakfast, then lunch with Guiness, and before and after dinner; whisky, most often local.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 07:07PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 07:04PM
Quote
mrcondron
So, do you own your little square inch of land in Scotland?

I indeed do. Plot No: 136129



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2009 07:06PM by eeek.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 07:10PM
A true Laphroaigher. We must meet and have a wee dram..



Old Dude
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 08:15PM
Quote
mrcondron
Lagavulin or Laphroaig?

Ardbeg Ten. While I'll drink either Lagavulin or Laphroiag (I have both at home), when you want better, it's none of this watered down 43% alcohol, chill-filtering, with caramel "coulouring".

I'll take a 46% alcohol, non-chill-filtered whisky with its natural pale straw "colour".

avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 09:26PM
"When You Stop at the Pub, What is Yer Favourite Grog" smileys with beer

(new title)wink
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 09:28PM
Quote
Bee
"When You Stop at the Pub, What is Yer Favourite Grog" smileys with beer

(new title)wink

grog
n : rum cut with water

Doesn't sound very good.
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:17PM
Quote

Doesn't sound very good.

Darn near anything tastes good when the ambience is right
avatar Re: Backpacking food
April 27, 2009 10:31PM
Quote
Bee
Darn near anything tastes good when the ambience is right

Well...yeah...
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