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Bees...

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Bees...
April 25, 2016 08:32AM
We've added one more item to our first aid kit for backpacking, but it's not something we suggest for everyone. As you may know, I am an avid cyclist. I try to ride just about every day for 15+ miles, and have regularly ridden over 5,000 miles a year.

But over the past few years, I've been stung by bees a few times, and each time the reaction to the sting has become more pronounced. The last time I was stung, about month ago, it was on the thigh, and my entire thigh swelled up to about 150% of it's normal size., and growing.

That's when I decided it was worth going to the doctor about this. The doctor prescribed some massive dosages of prednisone, and then asked me what I liked to do for fun. When I mentioned backpacking, the doc immediately prescribed a couple of epipens. He was concerned that if I were stung near my head by a bee, the reaction could easily prevent me from breathing, and I'd would be far from medical help. There's a happy thought.

So we've added this to our FAK for in the mountains, even though it adds a few ounces to our packs. Wonder if there is an ultralight version?



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Or just read a good mystery novel set in the Sierra; https://www.amazon.com/Danger-Falling-Rocks-Paul-Wagner/dp/0984884963
Re: Bees...
April 25, 2016 12:12PM
I also have to carry Epipens and I hate the size. Decades ago when I first started carrying epinephrine, it came in a regular syringe the size of a syringe used for insulin so two were very easy to carry and were preloaded with the correct dose of epinephrine. However, that meant that you had to be comfortable putting the needle into yourself and pushing the plunger. I didn't have a issue with doing that, but evidently a lot of people did so now it is an autoinjector. The first Epipen was smaller than the one they have now and I have no idea why they had to make it even bigger. There is another injector called a Auvi-Q but they are square and still take up a lot of room and also all of them have been recalled right now. There is also the generic autoinjector called Adrenaclick and but it looks like the same size of a Epipen. With dealing with anaphylaxis, I don't want to be using a generic.

I wish there was a smaller version because sometimes I just wear a small butt pack or carry a small purse and two don't always fit and I end up carrying one which is not a good thing to do because sometimes you need two doses. BTW did your doctor tell you that once you use the Epipen that you need to get medical attention because sometimes two doses don't work and/or the symptoms can return later and you might need additional treatment? You might want to talk to an allergist about your reactions. I am going to one next month that specializes in desensitization to foods, medications and insect stings.
avatar Re: Bees...
April 26, 2016 08:49PM
I have EpiPens for my peanut allergy.
I have a concern bringing one on any trip due to the storage requirements of them, can't leave it any place that gets hot.
That means car/bearbox/backpack that's in the sun.
Between worrying about overheating and ruining one, and the unlikely hood of running into peanuts while backpacking, I usually don't bother to bring one.
Re: Bees...
April 27, 2016 01:15PM
Quote
qumqats
I have EpiPens for my peanut allergy.
I have a concern bringing one on any trip due to the storage requirements of them, can't leave it any place that gets hot.
That means car/bearbox/backpack that's in the sun.
Between worrying about overheating and ruining one, and the unlikely hood of running into peanuts while backpacking, I usually don't bother to bring one.
I have multiple allergies that I need to carry Epipen for. If I am out and about, I always either have it in my purse or in my buttpack. It is not much help if I leave it in the car and have a reaction when I am not in the car. In hot weather when I have been hiking, I have put it next to the water bladder of my Camelback and that seems to keep it cool enough. I have been looking into getting one of these insulin cooling wallets and see how it works. http://coolerconcept.com/ or http://www.allergyapparel.com/insulated-wallet/ From what I read these will keep a range of 77-79 degrees when it is 100 degrees outside and this is the range that you want to store you Epipen in.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/27/2016 01:17PM by parklover.
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