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Yosemite Fires – Update #2 – July 26, 2010

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avatar Yosemite Fires – Update #2 – July 26, 2010
July 28, 2010 12:10PM
The park experienced thunder storms this past weekend (July 24 – 25), which has resulted in two new fires within wilderness boundaries. The fires will be managed for multiple objectives. This means fire managers and firefighters may use less aggressive or minimal actions where the fire is accomplishing benefits on the land. For example, the fire may burn the understory of trees, ridding the area of accumulations of dead and down vegetation and accumulations of needle and leaf litter.

All fires listed are being monitored and data is being collected (fuel moistures and weather ) to determine what actions will be taken. In wilderness areas Minimum Impact Management Tactics (MIMT) are utilized by using natural barriers of rock and lakes, or utilizing trails and past fires thereby lessoning the use of aggressive hand tools, i.e. chain saws. Utilizing the minimal tool and natural features further reduces the work needed to rehabilitate the fire area. Firefighters do this without diverting their attention from the safety of themselves or the public. These adjustments firefighters make to effect minimum resource impacts are essential if the spirit of wilderness and National Parks is to be
maintained.

New Fires

Slope fire: (37 54.572 x 119 40.924; 6900’ el., Tuolumne Co) The slope fire was found late afternoon Sunday the 25, of July, and is approximately one mile n/w of Harden Lake in an area of frequent fires: 1985, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2009. A single tree struck by lightning and 75% of the fire area is experiencing active smoldering and creeping fire behavior. As of 7/26, 2 acres had burned. This fire has potential to grow larger. Periodic smoke may be visible along Tioga Rd, O’Shaughnessy Dam, of the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, and across the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River toward Rancheria trail area. It is on a north aspect with cedar and fir trees, down tree limbs and compacted short needles as the predominate vegetation. There are numerous trails in the area and hikers are advised to use caution and stay on trails through the fire area; particularly affected will be the Trail to Smith Peak from Harden Lake.

Olmsted fire: (37 48.319 x 119.28.836; 8400’ el., Mariposa Co.) A single tree was hit by lightning and is smoldering on the ground surrounded by granite with little potential to spread. This fire will continue to be visible to those stopping at Olmsted Point or driving along the Tioga Rd.

Other fires:

Tuolumne: (37 57.024 x 119 32.58; 8000’ el., Tuolumne Co). This fire has grown to 3.88 acres, but is showing very minimal fire growth. Due to diminished fire behavior, fire crews were pulled from a spike camp, but will continue to monitor the fire from the air and remote locations from the south side of the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River.

Wildcat 2: ( 37 56.865 x 119 30.447; 8000’ el., Tuolumne Co.) This fire has grown to 4.5 acres, and is also showing minimal fire activity. Fire crews will monitor this fire from the same location as the Tuolumne fire.


The National Weather Service is predicting more thunder storms later in the week of 7/26/10.

Another update will be out in the next few days as new data is collected, including photos. Additional maps and photographs are available to view on the Yosemite Webpage: http://www.nps.gov/yose/fire.

“The National Park Service manages wildland fire to protect the public, communities and infrastructure, conserve natural and cultural resources and restore and maintain ecological health.” For Additional Information: Fire Information and Education Office: (209) 372-0480 or Yosemite Online: http://www.nps.gov/yose/fire
avatar Yosemite Fires – Update #3 – July 29, 2010
July 29, 2010 02:32PM
The park experienced thunder storms the weekend of July 24 – 25, which resulted in two new fires within wilderness boundaries. The fires are being managed for multiple objectives. This means fire managers and firefighters may use less aggressive or minimal actions where the fire is accomplishing benefits on the land. For example, the fire may burn the understory of trees, ridding the area of accumulations of dead and down vegetation and accumulations of needle and leaf litter.

All fires listed are being monitored and data is being collected (fuel moistures and weather) to determine what actions will be taken. In wilderness areas Minimum Impact Management Tactics (MIMT) are utilized by using natural barriers of rock and lakes, or utilizing trails and past fires thereby lessening the use of aggressive hand tools, i.e. chain saws. Utilizing the minimal tool and natural features further reduces the work needed to rehabilitate the fire area. Firefighters do this without diverting their attention from the safety of themselves or the public. These adjustments firefighters make to effect minimum resource impacts are essential if the spirit of wilderness and National Parks is to be maintained.

New Fires

Slope fire: (37 54.572 x 119 40.924; 6900’ el., Tuolumne Co) The Slope fire was found late afternoon Sunday the 25, of July, and is approximately one mile n/w of Harden Lake in an area of frequent fires: 1985, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2009. The lightning caused fire has burned 25 acres in the last three days, and fire activity is active. Fuels are receptive and the fire perimeter is experiencing active flame production, and smoldering fire behavior. This fire has potential to grow larger. Periodic smoke may be visible along Tioga Rd, O’Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, and across the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River toward Rancheria trail area. It is on a north aspect with cedar and fir trees, down tree limbs and compacted short needles as the predominate vegetation. There are numerous trails in the area and hikers are advised to use caution and stay on trails through the fire area; particularly affected will be the trail to Smith Peak from Harden Lake. “Fire near the Trail” warnings signs are in place.

Olmsted fire: (37 48.319 x 119.28.836; 8400’ el., Mariposa Co.) A single tree was hit by lightning and is out.

Other fires:

Tuolumne: (37 57.024 x 119 32.58; 8000’ el., Tuolumne Co). This fire has grown to 3.88 acres, but is showing very minimal fire growth. Due to diminished fire behavior, fire crews were pulled from a spike camp, but will continue to monitor the fire from the air and remote locations from the south side of the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River.

Wildcat 2: (37 56.865 x 119 30.447; 8000’ el., Tuolumne Co.) This fire has grown to 4.5 acres, and is also showing minimal fire activity within the perimeter. Fire crews will monitor this fire from the same location as the Tuolumne fire.

The National Weather Service is predicting an increasing warming trend over the next few days. The park has experienced late afternoon to evening, high altitude visible smoke from the West and Bull fires to the south, and the Mono fire from the east.

NASA satellite images of smoke: http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/subsets/index.php?subset=AERONET_Fresno.2010208.aqu



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/29/2010 02:33PM by eeek.
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