Welcome! Log In Create A New Profile Recent Posts
Deer in Yosemite

The Moon is Waning Crescent (23% of Full)


Advanced

Re: Bear Question

All posts are those of the individual authors and the owner of this site does not endorse them. Content should be considered opinion and not fact until verified independently.

Bear Question
June 19, 2011 11:40AM
OK - This is a stupid question I acknowledge this upfront - I'm bringing my family to the valley to camp for a week (I was one of the lucky ones back in February 15th and landed a reservation - I have three daughters and they are all freaking out about the bears (including my wife)

I know all of things I have to do - bear box for everything including toiletries, etc

However, I'm not too excited about using the fire ring to cook my food and wanted to bring up my smoker to cook - We love to use mesquite briquets to flavor the food but they usually take many hours to cool off and at home I wait until the next morning to clean it out once the coals have gotten cold.

Would this be hazardous regarding the bears? - Also, what about the grill that may have drippings still on it - Is it possible to clean it off immediately - are there sinks by the bathroom that would accomodate this? Is it unwise to leave it like this overnight?

Any advice would be appreciated!
Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 12:07PM
There is a basin at the bathroom that you are supposed to flush your used dish water in. However, they tell you to do the actual washing at your site. I assume this is to prevent a long line of people waiting to wash their dishes. As far as the BBQ, as long as nothing is left outside that has food or odors stuck to it, you are fine to leave the coals outside. We just got back from 3 nights in Upper Pines, had a great time.
avatar Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 07:22PM
Quote
hotrod4x5
There is a basin at the bathroom that you are supposed to flush your used dish water in. However, they tell you to do the actual washing at your site. I assume this is to prevent a long line of people waiting to wash their dishes. As far as the BBQ, as long as nothing is left outside that has food or odors stuck to it, you are fine to leave the coals outside. We just got back from 3 nights in Upper Pines, had a great time.

I don't think it's really possible to eliminate food or odors from any kind of grill, to the point where a bear's incredible sense of smell won't detect it. There will be something left. That doesn't mean one needs to panic though. All over the Valley campgrounds there are people who have left out their camp stoves and charcoal grills. You see pots and utensils all around that are bound to have some smells. I think the idea is that bears will be attracted to all the assorted smells in the campground; it's unavoidable with people storing stuff in bear boxes and cooking on picnic tables and fire rings. However - the key is supposed to be that the bears shouldn't get any sort of payoff for following their noses. Place it out there, let the bears explore what they've smelled, and if there's nothing to be had they're less likely to come back.
avatar Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 12:21PM
Quote
SoCalCPA
OK - This is a stupid question I acknowledge this upfront - I'm bringing my family to the valley to camp for a week (I was one of the lucky ones back in February 15th and landed a reservation - I have three daughters and they are all freaking out about the bears (including my wife)

I know all of things I have to do - bear box for everything including toiletries, etc

However, I'm not too excited about using the fire ring to cook my food and wanted to bring up my smoker to cook - We love to use mesquite briquets to flavor the food but they usually take many hours to cool off and at home I wait until the next morning to clean it out once the coals have gotten cold.

Would this be hazardous regarding the bears? - Also, what about the grill that may have drippings still on it - Is it possible to clean it off immediately - are there sinks by the bathroom that would accomodate this? Is it unwise to leave it like this overnight?

Any advice would be appreciated!

You should be able to leave your grate outside the bear box as the grates on the fire rings stay in place. If possible store your grates on the fire ring after cooking so any prowling bears don't tip your smoker. I doubt any bears will be interested in spending time with your grate anyway as they will be looking for better pickings than that.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/19/2011 12:22PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 01:34PM
I don't have any experience with a smoker, but I can tell you that for many years, I've brought along
first a small Weber 'Smokey Joe' grill, and for the past handful of years now a full-sized Weber charcoal
kettle grill (I disassemble it both going and returning, so it fits pretty easily in my SUV smiling smiley). We cook some
fatty and fragrant things on it (steaks, sausage, wild salmon, etc.), and when we're finished, we just make
sure to scrape off the grill surface thoroughly of any clinging food bits with a grill brush. Then we close
the grill up and let the coals cool off overnight. Never had a single problem with a bear, raccoon, or any
other critter fiddling with or knocking over the grill in any way. I think there are perhaps too many other
(and more promising) interesting smells in the campground for it to be of much interest.
My experience is you'll be fine.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/19/2011 01:45PM by PineCone.
Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 05:51PM
Thanks guys - just need to apply a little common sense is what I figured - Thanks for the advise though - I will follow it.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/19/2011 05:52PM by SoCalCPA.
Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 06:37PM
Quote
SoCalCPA
Thanks guys - just need to apply a little common sense is what I figured - Thanks for the advise though - I will follow it.

I am not sure if this is a big help, but I bring several bottles of Honey. I pour honey on the campsites away from me. That usually gets the bears going in the other direction.
Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 06:42PM
Quote
telfair ave
Quote
SoCalCPA
Thanks guys - just need to apply a little common sense is what I figured - Thanks for the advise though - I will follow it.

I am not sure if this is a big help, but I bring several bottles of Honey. I pour honey on the campsites away from me. That usually gets the bears going in the other direction.
Smiling dogpile
Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 06:47PM
Brilliant!!! - That would keep any Bear at bay - I'll give that job up to my daughters and tell them it's the only way to keep bears away from the campsite



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/19/2011 06:47PM by SoCalCPA.
Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 07:56PM
Very good point YPW, if the bear smells something, but there is no reward, he'll move on.
avatar Re: Bear Question
June 19, 2011 08:16PM
I'm sure anyone who has camped in the Valley enough years has several interesting stories to tell
regarding bears and food. In (the now dearly departed) Upper River campground, I once walked by a
site at night where the family had the rear hatch open on their minivan, light on inside the van, and an
open bag of marshmallows laying just inside (waiting for an ideal photo op I assume). eye rolling smiley
Also saw a bear sneak up in the dark on a group of British retirees camped across from us one year in
Lower Pines , and silently lift a jar of honey hanging in a plastic bag on the back of one of their camp
chairs (for their evening tea naturally)!
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login