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Re: A Most Interesting Tree

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avatar A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 11:23AM
Could easily walk by it and think nothing much:


Upon closer inspection:


This could be quite common sight in the Western Juniper. But I just don't recall seeing it in my travels.
I suppose I will see it on every Juniper from now on.



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 11:33AM
On an unrelated note.. amazingly was able to use my GPS once again and not get lost.
I guess I have one that works. Didn't see anyone out there... but that's usually one of my goals. wink



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 12:45PM
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chick-on
Didn't see anyone out there... but that's usually one of my goals. wink

It's one of my goals too but it seems to become a little more difficult each year.
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 01:10PM
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Louis
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chick-on
Didn't see anyone out there... but that's usually one of my goals. wink

It's one of my goals too but it seems to become a little more difficult each year.

Actually, often I need to hike far less away from the road here around the San Francisco Peninsula parklands to avoid seeing any people than around Yosemite and other popular Sierra destinations. And it's a lot closer to home. It's just that the scenery of the peninsula's wildlands, while very nice, isn't in the same spectacular class as it is around Yosemite and the High Sierras. But if I want solitude, I'm more likely to find it there than in Yosemite and its environs.

But then again, I really don't mind meeting fellow hikers and backpackers on a trail as long as they're well behaved (as most of them are in my experience).
Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 01:25PM
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plawrence
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Louis
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chick-on
Didn't see anyone out there... but that's usually one of my goals. wink

It's one of my goals too but it seems to become a little more difficult each year.

Actually, often I need to hike far less away from the road here around the San Francisco Peninsula parklands to avoid seeing any people than around Yosemite and other popular Sierra destinations. And it's a lot closer to home. It's just that the scenery of the peninsula's wildlands, while very nice, isn't in the same spectacular class as it is around Yosemite and the High Sierras. But if I want solitude, I'm more likely to find it there than in Yosemite and its environs.

But then again, I really don't mind meeting fellow hikers and backpackers on a trail as long as they're well behaved (as most of them are in my experience).

Definitely. More than a few times I've parked at Muir Woods and after making the regular loop and wading through all the tourists I take one of the trails up into the Mt. Tam area and in no time it's like I'm the only one around for miles.
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 01:10PM
I don't need GPS. I've never been lost. A bit confused for a few days, but never lost.
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 01:26PM
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Dave
I don't need GPS. I've never been lost. A bit confused for a few days, but never lost.

"I'm not lost. I'm right HERE!"
Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 01:46PM
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eeek
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Dave
I don't need GPS. I've never been lost. A bit confused for a few days, but never lost.

"I'm not lost. I'm right HERE!"

No, I'm right HERE! You're THERE! smiling smiley
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 02:02PM
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Dave
I don't need GPS. I've never been lost. A bit confused for a few days, but never lost.

I like to get "lost" out there. It's why I go.

(I love how you guys pick one thing I say unrelated to the topic and beat the crapola out of it.)

p.s. I like Ice Cream



Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 02:37PM
Things DO seem to have gotten a bit contentious around here lately. I know there's a LOT more traffic on the forum now as compared to when I signed up in the middle of this past winter. Does it get like this every summer?

And, although that was at least relevant to chick-on's last comment, I'll bring this back to the main topic to say that Yes, that IS a really cool tree but then I find a LOT of trees really interesting...one of my favorite things about Yosemite is that when you get tired of looking at all the granite (Yeah, like THAT'S gonna happen!), the trees are every bit as fascinating.
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 02:50PM
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chick-on
p.s. I like Ice Cream
Home made strawberry is the best.
Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 04:29PM
Great tree pictures. Years ago we found an oak near Camp 4 that looks like the torso of an old woman with droopy breasts. (It was not my first impression of the tree but my husband's). The "Old Patriarch" tree in Grand Teton NP also has some twisty branches. It is a great tree to photograph with the Tetons in the background as the sun rises.

Yesterday was National Ice Cream Day.
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 18, 2011 05:37PM
The clowns here don't get any Ice Cream.

Ok, MAYBE I'll put some "sprinkles" on The Marmuts Tuti-Fruiti Ice Cream.

The tree was amazing in my little noggin.
It looked like the branch had completely died.... then ka-plooyie.. out comes
a new branch wrapping itself around the old dead one.
Just really really neato (that's the scientific terminology).

I thought MAYBE someone else out there would see it and go "har har I see
that all the time silly birdie, you need to stop and smell the trees instead
of the flowers". There were indeed a lot of flowers out there... and quite a
number of interesting mushrooms (and no, I didn't eat any!). Here's one:





Chick-on is looking at you!
Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 19, 2011 10:10PM
Have hunted magnificent and gnarly Sierra juniper for decades. Interestingly twisting trunks and branches is one of their common forms. This one north of Ebbetts Pass I call "The Twister":





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/19/2011 10:12PM by DavidSenesac.
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 19, 2011 11:26PM
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DavidSenesac
Have hunted magnificent and gnarly Sierra juniper for decades. Interestingly twisting trunks and branches is one of their common forms. This one north of Ebbetts Pass I call "The Twister":


"Angst" comes to mind.



Old Dude
avatar Re: A Most Interesting Tree
July 20, 2011 10:29AM
Yes... but I've never seen it like that.
New branch wrapping around an old one.

Was really wondering if anyone else has.

(also wondering if you went into Cherry Creek Canyon ... )



Chick-on is looking at you!
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