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Re: I'd rather die on this mountain

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I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 02:18PM
I just posted a little anecdotal story on my weblog that I though many here might appreciate.

I hope you'll take a moment to check it out, as I stand by my statement that no truer words have ever been spoken.

I'd rather die on this mountain...



Gary Crabbe
Enlightened Images

"Nearness to Nature keeps the Spirit sensitive to impressions not commonly felt, and in touch with unseen powers." - Oyihesa; Santee Dakota indian, from his book, Soul of the Indian (1911)
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 02:23PM
smiling smiley

The Old Dude is 67

Haven't killed him yet... but he thinks I'm trying to sometimes.



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 02:41PM
Olde Dude only has one year on me? I thought he was older that dirt. Or did you post his age with dyslexia?winking smiley
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 04:56PM
Ooops... Old Dude is 68.



Chick-on is looking at you!
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 05:00PM
Quote
chick-on
Ooops... Old Dude is 68.

and a half.



Old Dude
Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 02:43PM
I couldn't have put it better myself and I have every intention of wearing out at least a couple pair of hiking boots when I hit my 70's!
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 09:17PM
My Whitney hiking buddy is going to bee 76 this year, and he summited once again this last weekend (if he is slow, than I am slower -- he still got to the summit and back to the car faster than I did last year)



The body betrays and the weather conspires, hopefully, not on the same day.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/15/2011 09:18PM by Bee.
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 16, 2011 08:42AM
I don't think she wants to die, just doesn't want to die in a nursing home. And I can't blame her. She is likely more fit and prepared, and therefore less likely to die, than many others climbing that mountain!
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 16, 2011 09:30AM
A Sierra Club hike leader from Groveland is leading a day hike to Cloud's Rest in a few weeks, 14 miles, and he is going to be 80 in October. He is a constant inspiration to me.
Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 15, 2011 10:01PM
Impressive gal and congrats to you. Use it or lose it becomes more a truth once one sees a bit of grey hair looking in mirrors. Even just carrying a light daypack, I'd get rather beat up tackling HD in a day even though I backpack frequently. But yeah not too far behind your acquaintance. Recall a few years ago you said something about an injury that ended your overnight backcountry days. Does this signal you are not quite that dead.

David
http://www.davidsenesac.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/15/2011 10:02PM by DavidSenesac.
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 16, 2011 06:07AM
This choice to enter the wilderness by the aging population raises some questions.

All deaths involve cardiopulmonary arrest. How that condition is reached is more variable, although still very limited ( loss of effective circulating blood volume by loss of pumping function or by loss of effective air exchange). With the current efforts at reducing coronary artery disease sudden death, many people experience death that occurs more gradually as these functions deteriorate slowly.

Should those who would rather "die on this mountain" carry a "DNR" (do not resuscitate) bracelet?
Should search and rescue factor age into rescue operation decisions?
Should those who wish to die in the mountains leave notes to discourage, rather than encourage search efforts?
At what point does a "natural" death in the wilderness become a suicide by exposure event?



The cure for a fallacious argument is a better argument, not the suppression of ideas.
-- Carl Sagan
Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 16, 2011 07:23AM
Quote
Frank Furter
This choice to enter the wilderness by the aging population raises some questions.

All deaths involve cardiopulmonary arrest. How that condition is reached is more variable, although still very limited ( loss of effective circulating blood volume by loss of pumping function or by loss of effective air exchange). With the current efforts at reducing coronary artery disease sudden death, many people experience death that occurs more gradually as these functions deteriorate slowly.

Should those who would rather "die on this mountain" carry a "DNR" (do not resuscitate) bracelet?
Should search and rescue factor age into rescue operation decisions?
Should those who wish to die in the mountains leave notes to discourage, rather than encourage search efforts?
At what point does a "natural" death in the wilderness become a suicide by exposure event?

While you made good points, I think that you missed the jest of the whole story. The woman would rather die doing things she likes and not sitting in a room watching TV. While I don't want to be a SAR, I hope that I don't die in a rest home like my Dad did. He would have rather died on the golf course like his friend did and the rest of the foursome continuing the last few holes in his honor.
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 16, 2011 05:42AM
I met an energetic lady very similar to your description as I had just started down from Yosemite Falls on the 14th of June after spending 5 days atop camping and enjoying the quite, crowd free environment . My boys and I were about 10 minutes into our descent when a gentleman said a "VERY SPECIAL WOMAN" by the name of Rosemary was coming up behind him and to say hello to her. About 5 more minutes passed and she was before us and was she IMPRESSIVE!! She was steady in her pace, two ace bandages on knees, walking stick in hand and a head-band on. I then knew this was Rosemary. She had another woman close by her side watching her every step, daughter maybe. When she came within speaking distance we stopped and I looked her in the eyes and said with a very respectable tone, GOOD MORNING ROSEMARY! A big smile came across her face and she said, and I quote: Who in the hell up here would know my name? She was just laughing and smiling larger than life!! We told her of the man earlier and went on to tell her that she was an inspiration to us all and how we hoped we were able to go on like her as we get older. She smiled and said to stay active and outdoors and it doesn't matter how fast you go, just go!! She also said she did these hikes once a year at least. Maybe she felt really good this year and you were able to meet this "SPECIAL" lady on your journey. I hope this woman or women, has/ have many more "Happy Trails" in her/them that other people may be inspired as I have been. It is a very small world you know!!
avatar Re: I'd rather die on this mountain
August 16, 2011 11:31AM
way cool story!!! thanks for sharing that.
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