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Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice

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Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 12:51PM
I've been obsessed with Yosemite for years and I've read just about anything I can get my hands on (by the way - HUGE thanks and gratitude to Chick-On Chick-on avec les pieds for the incredible posts and pictures. Your photos are a real treasure - you've made this lady very happy!). For those with lots of Yosemite experience, what's a not-to-miss hike you would recommend for novice hikers? I mean really novice - we are from the midwest, where land doesn't get any flatter. Yosemite books and videos recommend the typical touristy spots (Glacier Point, blah blah blah) but I am interested in the hikes that aren't quite as common. Here are my thoughts: Hiking to the top of Liberty Cap? Grizzly Peak? Half Dome Diving Board? (I've heard the HDDB trail is hard to find.....and are the slopes and manzanitas pretty trecherous, or not too bad?). I'm also fascinated with John Muir's Fern Ledge, but I've read horror stories about Sunnyside Bench eye popping smiley Thanks very much! smiling smiley
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 01:44PM
"Not-to-miss hike" for "really novice".

I highly recommend that you are not scared away from the "touristy" spots. If you really are "really novice" then all the hikes you mentioned really are not suitable.

Besides for a first time Yosemite hiker it would be a shame to miss the "tourist" hikes. Mist Trail to Vernal Fall, Nevada Falls, Four Mile Trail, Yosemite Falls in order of difficulty. Here is my recommendation: I'm assuming you are going to be there on a very busy Summer day. Just go out early in the morning and you can practically have the place to yourself. Late evening actually works as well. If you have done all those and this isn't your first time then I would suggest Clouds Rest from Tenaya Lakes. The knife edge risk isn't as bad as much written about it online and you can do it in 14 miles.


Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 02:26PM
Thanks Chicagocwright. Great video of Cloud's Rest. We definitely plan on seeing the popular spots as well, but wonder if the Disneylandish crowds might take away some of the beauty of the experience. We thought about going in the fall when the crowds have thinned out, but then we'll miss the waterfalls sad smiley
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 02:25PM
BDM, please don't think I'm trying to burst your bubble but the hikes you mention strike me as VERY ambitious for a novice hiker...you'd be dealing with searching for unofficial and ill-defined trails in the wilderness, dealing with more than a little hiking-bordering-on-mountain-climbing and all while struggling with altitudes the likes of which you sound like you've not experienced before. To put some context around my remarks, I'm from NJ but my wife and I spend almost all of our vacation time hiking in the western part of the country. I've spent a total of somewhere between 100 and 125 days in Yosemite and at least that much in other NP's and I would not attempt the hikes you mention unless I had somebody very experienced guiding me.

Some other thoughts:
* First and foremost, there's a reason why the videos recommend those places...despite the crowds, Yosemite Valley probably has more mind-boggling, awe-inspiring, literally take-your-breath-away scenery in its measly 7 square miles than any place else on the planet! If you've not been there, it is insane to skip it. By all means, go early in the morning when crowds are minimal but do not skip this most wonderous of wonderful sites. (You don't say when you plan to go but unless you're looking at next summer, you've already missed the peak waterfall season (which was far from peak this year) but the Valley is still breath-taking. Driving in from the west and getting your first close-up-and-personal view of El Capitan is, to this day, something that makes my jaw drop and my lungs forget to work. I do not use the word "stunning" in any but it's most literal sense here.
* Some slightly less crowded places, especially if you go very early are, indeed, Glacier Point (if there are too many people there, hike a half-mile or so down the Four Mile Trail...that section is very accessible to a novice and, once you get down the first quarter of a mile or so (which is somewhat wooded), the views are every bit as spectacular as GP itself.
* Sentinel Dome often strikes me as perhaps the biggest bang-for-the-buck hike in or near the Valley. It's only 1.5 miles each way and minimal elevation gain but it will net you 360-degree views of the valley, Little Yosemite Valley and Tenaya Canyon (not to mention, on a clear day, views all the way up to the high country).
* Further south, the hike to the top of Chilnuana Falls will be crowded at the beginning but you'll quickly have the trail, if not quite all to yourself, than at least largely to yourself. This ca. 7-mile RT gains a fair amount of altitude but, for the most part, does it so gradually, that even a mid-westerner shouldn't struggle too much! spinning smiley sticking its tongue out It'll also take you past raging torrents, wildflower-filled meadows, nice forests, some not insignificant patches of granite and top-off with a wonderful waterfall which you can't see from much of anyplace except by being at its very top.
* I'd normally say that the Mariposa Grove is an absolute must-see but they're doing extensive work up there now and it'll be a year or two before you can drive to the trailheads. If you're feeling ambitious, you can hike there from the Wawona Hotel (ask carefully for directions to the TH...its sort of hidden away in a residential area) but it's about 6 miles each way and gains about 3000 feet of elevation. To that 12 miles RT, add the fact that you'll add at least 2 or 3 miles more wandering around the grove and that will probably be a very tiring and long day for you. On the other hand, unless you're in a part of the grove where they're removing the tram road, you should have a high degree of solitude there.
* AFTER you've had a chance to adjust to 4000-6000 feet of altitude, a few of my favorite hikes in the high country are
* Upper Cathedral Lake (you can also do a detour to Lower Cathedral on the way but I'd suggest going to Upper first and seeing how tired you are. You'll lose a moderate amount of elevation (which you have to then regain) going to Lower and the first part of the trail to Lower is quite a bit rockier than the way to Upper. Lower is also a stunning lake (I've yet to find any of the high-alpine lakes in Yosemite that wasn't worth the effort) but Upper Cathedral is one of my favorites. The views are stunning all the way up and once you're at the lake, it's like being in one of chick-on's photos!
* It'll take you up to a lung-challenging 10,600 feet (although the gain is quite gentle) but the hike to Mono Pass is another one of those OMG-I-can't-believe-places-like-this-still-exist destinations. This will also give you a chance to investigate a bit of Yosemite's mining history as there are remnants of some old cabins very close to the Pass. If you feel ambitious, you could go out of Yosemite here and go part of the way down Bloody Canyon for some really nice views of Mono Lake.
* Glen Aulin will have you exploring the Tuolumne River from a gentle meander through TM to the point where it begins to turn into one raging waterfall after another. If you go in the summer, that one will likely be somewhat crowded but if its late summer, you should have plenty of room to yourself.
* Finally, if you've lurked here very long, you know I'm an "old-road-junkie." In the 1870's, there were 3 stage coach roads built into the Valley (Old Big Oak Flat Road, Old Coulterville Road and Old Wawona Road). Shortly after the OWR was completed, they added a spur road from Chinquapin out to GP (Old Glacier Point Road). About 15 years later, the Great Sierra Wagon Road (which evolved into the Old Tioga Road) was built. All of these roads, for the most part, still exist in conditions ranging from "I'm not even sure I'm standing on the road anymore" to still driveable (indeed, a few stretches of the OCR, OTR and OBOFR are still open to vehicles in the summer). It's wonderful to drive sections of these and get a taste of travel in Yosemite in the early days of the automobile but its even more fun to find some of the more intact (but no longer driveable) sections and hike these. If you believe in ghosts, you will find them here. If nothing else, you'll constantly wonder if you need to step aside for the next coach to get by you. Some sections that strike that balance between undriveable but still easy to follow are
* the OWR from slightly south of Bridalveil Falls up to Inspiration Point (there's also a very nice section beyond IP but, especially in the summer, it'll involve a fair amount of bush-whacking and fallen-tree-hopping)
* the OBOFR from Tamarack Flat CG down to Rainbow View (it's much shorter to hike up from the Valley floor to Rainbow View but you'll have to do a fair amount of scrambling over washouts and rockslides that way and that may be a bit discomforting for a novice (I know that it made me nervous the first time I did it).
* the OGPR from BVCG to Badger Pass (if you walk through the massive BP parking area and find the continuation of the OGPR on the other side, you can continue to follow it down to Chinquapin but that makes it about 12 miles RT if you walk back (and it's all uphill on the way back!).
* the bottom-most portion of the OCR is rapidly being reclaimed by nature (the bottom few hundred feet are buried beneath one of the largest rock slides in recent Yosemite history and the last time I took this stretch up to Big Meadow, there was one spot where the road was so eroded that you pretty much had to grab hold of a manzanita bush and swing across a giant gap in what used to be the road...I'm sure that's only gotten worse over the last 4 or 5 years). However, if you take the modern access road down to Big Meadow (contrary to what some maps will tell you, that access road is NOT the OCR...the line of the true OCR is behind the big row of dumpsters on your left as you head down to Big Meadow), and park by the barn on the edge of the meadow, you'll be back on the OCR and its in very good shape from there all the way into Coulterville (at the Coulterville end, the old road is still maintained and used, albeit under a number of different names). A hike from there to Little Nellie Falls is quite nice. Or you could continue heading out of the Park on the modern Big Oak Flat Road and stop at the Mercer Grove TH. When the trail to the grove makes it's first left turn, you'll be back on the OCR and this gives you a wonderful sense of what it must have been like for early travellers to see one of these remarkable trees for the first time. FYI, there's also a nice stretch of the OBOFR that starts at the Tuolumne Grove TH and goes to Hodgdon Meadow. That's also a lovely hike but since a good chunk of this is still paved (it was open to cars up until fairly recently) it doesn't give you quite the same sense of history (and the end at the grove will likely be crowded).

OK, I'm going to stop there. I'm sure you'll get lots of advice here but I (and, I'm sure, a lot of others) can't stress enough that if you don't have experience at these altitudes, you really must pace yourself. You can probably acclimate to 4000 ft (Wawona and the Valley floor) pretty quickly. 6000-7000 feet (the Valley rims) will be a bit more challenging but you can adjust fairly quickly. However if you head into the high country (anywhere from 7000 to 11000 feet...more if you start going up some of the peaks), you will NOT enjoy yourself if you haven't given yourself time to adjust.

Whatever you do, remember that a "bad day" in Yosemite is better than a fabulous day almost anywhere else...stay safe, know your limits and don't feel like you have to do it all in one trip (trust me, you can't) and you'll have a wonderful time.



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 06/15/2015 02:48PM by DavidK42.
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 02:41PM
Thank you SO much DavidK42!!!
avatar Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 02:38PM
Quote
BigDogMom
I've been obsessed with Yosemite for years and I've read just about anything I can get my hands on (by the way - HUGE thanks and gratitude to Chick-On Chick-on avec les pieds for the incredible posts and pictures. Your photos are a real treasure - you've made this lady very happy!). For those with lots of Yosemite experience, what's a not-to-miss hike you would recommend for novice hikers? I mean really novice - we are from the midwest, where land doesn't get any flatter. Yosemite books and videos recommend the typical touristy spots (Glacier Point, blah blah blah) but I am interested in the hikes that aren't quite as common. Here are my thoughts: Hiking to the top of Liberty Cap? Grizzly Peak? Half Dome Diving Board? (I've heard the HDDB trail is hard to find.....and are the slopes and manzanitas pretty trecherous, or not too bad?). I'm also fascinated with John Muir's Fern Ledge, but I've read horror stories about Sunnyside Bench eye popping smiley Thanks very much! smiling smiley


If you truly rate yourself as a novice, then all those choices that I highlighted in red are REALLY BAD CHOICES for you. None of them are hikes suited for total novices. It's on hikes like these that novices get into trouble and need to be rescued by Yosemite Search and Rescue (YOSAR).

If you want to avoid the bulk of the tourists, the following are hikes that I would recommend for novice hikers:

1. The Four-Mile Trail (yes, there are people hiking that trail, but not really a whole lot).

2. The Valley Loop Trail west of Yosemite Lodge and Swinging Bridge (very few people hike this part of this beautiful and tranquil trail and the views are spectacular).

3. If you go by Tuolumne Meadows, hike up Pothole Dome (maybe the most scenic spot along Tuolumne Meadows and very uncrowded).

There are other relatively safe hikes for novices that I'm sure others here will recommend. But the ones you listed (that I highlighted in red) are simply not suited for novice hikers unless lead by an experience and patient guide.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/15/2015 02:48PM by plawrence.
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 02:52PM
Thank you Plawrence - I definitely don't want to be a visitor that puts the lives of the SAR people in jeopardy because of a bad judgment call, or end up another Yosemite statistic! The hikes I mentioned, I didn't know what they entailed because there is so little information out there on those hikes. So I am appreciative of the feedback!
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 03:57PM
Looks like you have already got great advice from some of the regulars here, I would add my two cents.

It mainly depends on a mix of one's hiking experience as well as fitness/conditioning. My suggestion will be to make a list of some of the hikes by distance/elevation gain/difficulty for each of the sections valley/Glacier Point/Tioga pass road and once you do 1-2 hikes out here, you can re-calibrate on what works for you. I would also pay special attention to regular eating/hydration/elctrolytes as it gets really hot here in CA, especially on the exposed/unshaded parts of the trail.

I agree with others that many of the hikes that you mentioned are intermediate hikes. So here are some great beginner hikes that are not so popular are:
1. Glacier Point to Taft Point. I think there' a trail for Taft Point from GP road too.
2. Granite Lake and Gaylor Lakes (on Tioga Pass). I haven't done this yet.
3. Hike to North Dome and Indian Arch, especially if you can't do Clouds Rest. (on Tioga Pass)
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 04:44PM
Here's a question I think is pretty important: when you go hiking back home, how long are your hikes?

If you've never done a 14 mile dayhike, Yosemite isn't the place to do your first one. smiling smiley

I'm a 55 year old male who started hiking in 2009 and now hikes ~ 400 miles a year. My wife hikes occasionally but much less (she'll do 5 mile, 1000 ft hikes). I don't have as much experience as most folks here, but for what it's worth here's what I would suggest.

For a great view of the Valley, do Sentinel Dome and Taft Point from Glacier Point. Awesome views of the valley and relatively little vertical.

If that goes OK, then give North Dome a try. The views are astounding!

If Sentinel Dome seemed like it was about as much as you want to do, that's great! Consider Lembert Dome / Dog Lake, or May Lake, or Lukens Lake from White Wolf. The hike from the Tioga Pass entrance up to Gaylor Peak is lots of fun, too.

I wouldn't consider Clouds Rest at all, honestly, unless you do 14 mile hikes routinely. Clouds Rest is amazing, but the hike is long and at times quite steep. For me the descent on the steep parts was rather unpleasant, with lots of exposed tree roots and such to be navigated. You'll spend quite a few miles looking down at your feet.

My wife and I have done all of the hikes I mentioned above and we both had a great time. I've been to Clouds Rest; she would NOT enjoy it.

Oh, one more to consider. If you're OK with a long hike but don't want a lot of vertical, consider Mono Pass. The views from there are incredible!

Have fun, don't overdo it.

...Sam
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 04:48PM
I should mention that even on the "relatively easy" hike to North Dome, I saw SAR have to come out to rescue a fellow who passed out on trail. It's impossible to tell how you will react to elevation until you experience it. Start out slow, drink lots of water, and ramp up.
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 04:40PM
BigDogMom, it would be useful for our suggestions if you gave us a sense of the physical conditioning of you and and the rest of your "we." Do you bike? jog? walk a lot (even if on flat land at low elevation)? You also hinted that you have some flexibility in your travel plans...if you can confirm that, that would help with our suggestions as well.
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 05:43PM
When I say "we", I just mean my husband and myself smiling smiley We are 50 years old, we like to walk/hike, but in the midwest our hikes are mostly in flat areas (certainly no steep surfaces like Yosemite). We are not athletes but we are in good health, except my husband has high blood pressure (which he's on medication for). I do worry about the altitude changes and how it will impact his blood pressure. And yes, we are flexible about the times we go, but here again we'll need some advice. My first choice is late April (fewer crowds and full waterfalls), but I also don't want to attempt the stairs at Vernal Fall if there is ice/frost. And I assume hiking is out of the question at winter. I certainly don't want to go slipping down one of Taft's fissures (or over a cliff)! Also what hiking trails have the most vertical drop-offs? I've read of a lot of accidents at Ledge Trail at Glacier Point.
avatar Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 10:15PM
Quote
BigDogMom
I've read of a lot of accidents at Ledge Trail at Glacier Point.

Don't even think about the Ledge Trail.

The Hike to the Merced Grove will kill two birds with one stone. (Chick-on excluded) Great hike that's not too strenuous at a lower elevation and a grove of big trees. About 1.5 miles one way with about 400' of elevation loss on the way in. You start at about 5500' so this hike will give you an idea of your elevation sensitivity. The trailhead is on hwy 120 not too far from the Big Oak Flat entrance. Also there aren't very many people on this trail ever. A restroom is located at the trailhead also.

Must do from Glacier Point Road: Taft Point from the road, Sentinel Dome using the parking area by the utility access road as a starting point, and Glacier Point itself,
From the valley go up the Four Mile Trail as far as is comfortable. If you get to the top you still have to come down so plan to catch the bus that goes down to the valley from Glacier Point in the PM or hike back down. OR take the bus up in the morning and hike down.

Whatever you decide on be sure to have at least one liter of water per person and some snackage with you at all times. Stay hydrated with water.



Old Dude



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/15/2015 10:17PM by mrcondron.
avatar Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 18, 2015 10:37PM
Quote
BigDogMom
My first choice is late April (fewer crowds and full waterfalls), but I also don't want to attempt the stairs at Vernal Fall if there is ice/frost. And I assume hiking is out of the question at winter. I certainly don't want to go slipping down one of Taft's fissures (or over a cliff)! Also what hiking trails have the most vertical drop-offs? I've read of a lot of accidents at Ledge Trail at Glacier Point.
The weather is likely to be iffy. I was in the Valley in late April both this year and last year. Both happened to be low-snow years, otherwise some trails like the Four Mile would have been closed due to snow. Last year I had two nice days, then one day of non-stop rain, then one day that started out with enough snow on the Valley floor to require tire chains in the morning. This year there was no snow to speak of but there were showers (and sometimes thunderstorms) every afternoon.

I wasn't counting on it, but both years, I happened to catch better hiking weather in January and February than in March and April.

When there's snow at higher elevations (usually partway into May), the Glacier Point Road past Badger Pass stays closed so Taft Point is pretty inaccessible. I understand it's possible to arrange to ski to Glacier Point and stay overnight at the hut there, but I've never tried it myself.

For me it's not the high vertical dropoffs that are worrisome. The Park Service is pretty good at providing railings, rock walls, and other protection in a lot of those places. Where it's easiest to get hurt is on the little six-foot dropoffs, the steep, uneven parts of some trails, and the rough stone steps. I understand it's the Mist Trail that holds the record for the most injuries. It's steep and narrow in places, some of the steps are high and uneven, and it's extremely popular (read, crowded).

The Ledge Trail is interesting historically but it's unmaintained, it's a death trap, and I want nothing to do with it myself.

Until you know where you want to hike and how your capabilities measure up to Yosemite's trails, I'd suggest walking up the Four Mile Trail and finding out how far you feel like going. The really good views start about 1000 feet above the valley floor and you can turn around whenever you feel like it. If you make it 3,200 feet (to an elevation of 7,200) you'll be at Glacier Point.

You shouldn't count on catching the bus down from Glacier Point. There are only three runs a day, the buses are usually full on the way up, seats become available only when riders opt to walk down, and there may be more people hoping for a seat than there are seats available.

Quote
boomtown
Mirror Lake loop trail.
For getting there and back, you have your choice of the Horsepoop Trail or the Deep Doodo Trail (unofficial names, both). If you get tired of horse scat and flies, you can also come back by the Lots Of Kids On Bicycles Road.
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 06:39PM
Mother,

I'm a flatland Midwesterner like yourself, and I won't steer you wrong:

EAGLE PEAK

Take it easy going up the YF trail and you'll be fine. If you find that you're not
up to it, just stop where you are, enjoy the view, and head back down.

Any effort required to get to Eagle Peak will be rewarded with a view that
you'll daydream about long after you get home.

(nobody knows about this place, so sssssssssshhhhhhhhhhh)
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 07:30PM
I'd love to hike to Eagle Peak - that one might have to wait until we've done some easier hikes smiling smiley
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 15, 2015 06:44PM
Yes, if that's the case, I'd say that Cloud's Rest is going to be iffy for you (my wife and I made many visits to Yosemite before we attempted that one). Late May (before Memorial Day) should still be relatively crowd-free and will still get you good waterfall flow (we've occasionally gotten snowed on in May around the 6000' level but it cleared up quickly). I wouldn't worry about the fissures at Taft...I think you'd have to almost go out of your way to fall down those!
Ledge Trail is definitely not for you (with recent activity there, even chick-on's said a while ago that he's avoiding it).

As for Vernal, it's unlikely to be icy in May (unless its a very long winter). When the waterfall is in full flow, you will get VERY wet on that trail. Bring plastic bags to wrap all your electronics, a poncho or other rain gear for yourself and bring a change of socks (seriously!). Much as I hate wet clothes, this is a fun way to get "rained" on. Just stay to the inside of the trail as much as possible, watch your step and you'll be fine (and don't get too close to the river at the top of the falls!) Vernal is also a nice introduction to elevation gain for a number of reasons...the trail up to the bridge where you'll first see the base of the falls is fairly steep but its wide, paved and frequently protected by a low wall on the outside. When you get to the bridge, you decide if you want to continue to the top of the falls (that's the stretch that gets you wet). If you get up there and are still feeling good, move on to the base of Nevada. Still perky, go to the top of Nevada (just make sure you save energy to get back down). You could even continue up LYV from there. If you DO make it to the top of Nevada (or beyond), most people prefer to come down the John Muir Trail instead of going back down the Mist trail. It's a little longer but its drier, less exposed and usually less crowded (it'll also give you a bit more variety). It'll hook up with the Mist again at that first bridge I mentioned.

As for winter hiking, certainly not out-of-the-question but many parts of Yosemite will be difficult to get to (GP Road will likely be closed, for example and Tioga Road almost definitely will be) and hiking in snow, at least for me, always seems 50-100% more tiring than hiking on dry trail (not to mention the occasional difficulty in knowing where the trail is!) so, until you get some experience in this kind of terrain, that's probably not the best choice for a first visit.

Also, when planning your hikes, allow yourself time to hang out at various points on the trail. I typically move at about 3-4 miles an hour when moving. Add in time for snack breaks, taking pictures, etc. and that slows me down to about 2 miles an hour. Factor in time to enjoy all the views, however, and my average can easily drop below a mile per hour.

You may want to invest in some hiking poles. We made a whole lot of trips before we got any and we now find they help immensely (not only do they help with stability, on steep trails they allow your hands to do some of the lifting that your legs would normally have to do...I find I can go significantly farther with poles than without now).

I'm not going to try to give you any medical advice but I will say that I had a problem with moderate hypertension for a while (I was averaging about 140 over 90). I was on meds for that for a while and eventually got it under control by losing about 30 pounds. I've hiked in Yosemite under all those conditions (untreated hypertension, medicated hypertension, no hypertension) and never felt a serious problem. Everyone's situation is different, however and your husband should definitely discuss that with his doctor (ideally with a doctor who has some experience with altitude). And, for a little more context, my wife and I are both about 60, work out regularly, and watch our diets pretty carefully. We also hike at altitude as often as we can (typically 3 or 4 7-10 day trips a year) but still make sure we take time to acclimate and to schedule in rest days on the longer trips.
avatar Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 16, 2015 09:26PM
You mentioned wanting to go in late April. While that can be a great time to visit, you could also find both Glacier Point Road and Hwy 120 still closed. Coming from where you are it would be a shame to lose all that access. If you are flexible enough to make plans on short notice, I would wait for those roads to open first. Certainly at least GPR. Reservations around that time of year are still easy to get at the last minute.
avatar Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 18, 2015 07:33AM
Mirror Lake loop trail. Not too crowded once you pass Mirror Lake. Amazing views of Half Dome. If you are feeling adventurous, Hidden Falls is a short scramble up the south side of Tenaya Creek at the East end of the loop. You will see a use trail heading upstream just South of the bridge that crosses Tenaya Creek.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/18/2015 07:38AM by boomtown.
Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 18, 2015 10:52AM
Is Hidden Falls pretty deep into Tenaya Canyon? Part of me would like to see Tenaya Canyon, but I wouldn't want to venture off too far.....
avatar Re: Hiking Questions from a total novice
June 19, 2015 07:47AM
No it's not very far. It's only maybe a 1/2 mile past the footbridge that crosses Tenaya Creek.
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